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Mobilizer: February 1967

This February 1967 issue of the "Mobilizer: To End Mass Murder in Vietnam" focuses on James Bevel's direct action anti-war demonstrations. As National Director of the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, Bevel outlines his strategy to launch a national movement involving community churches, students, labor groups, and others. The initiative is designed around a march to be held on April 15, 1967 in San Francisco and New York.

National Council of Churches Conference of Negro Leaders Opening Remarks

A. Philip Randolph makes remarks at the Conference of Negro Leaders National Council of Churches about the future of the Civil Rights Movement. Randolph expresses the importance of continuing the fight of social justice through civil rights, economics, housing and poverty.

Negroes Hurl Rocks; Cops, Drivers Hurt

An anonymous critic comments on a headline story that details a riot in Lansing, Michigan. Two additional reports are featured in the newspaper clipping including a short piece on Dr. King's visit to Jackson, Mississippi for a four day SCLC convention and a union convention in Kansas City, Missouri.

News from the AFL-CIO: Labor News Conference

AFL-CIO's public affairs program, the Labor News Conference. Donald Slaiman, Director of the AFL-CIO's Department of Civil Rights was questioned by Alan Adams of Business Week Magazine and Stanley Leward of Scripps-Howard Newspapers. The three have a discussion about apprenticeship opportunities for minority youths, particularly of Negro and Puerto Rican heritage.

No More Negro Cop Restrictions Asked

These newspaper clippings feature a photo and caption of Atlanta Police Chief Herbert Jenkins regarding the lifting of restrictions on Negro policemen arresting white persons, and an article on alleged violent tactics by a labor union.

On Being A Good Neighbor

In Dr. King's sermon "On Being A Good Neighbor," he explains variety of stories that aid him in defining a good samaritan as an altruistic human being. He uses the path to Jerusalem and Jericho as a walking path where people must help others to accomplish one goal equality.

Order of Contingents In April Parade in New York

This document lists the parade order for an anti-Vietnam war demonstration in New York. It also lists official slogans and regulations concerning the use of signs and placards.

Papal Encyclicals by George W. Lawrence

George W. Lawrence elaborates on the traditions and methodologies of the Catholic Church. Lawrence clarifies the Social Doctrines and states that men are governed by four laws located in "the Natural," "the Eternal," "the Human," and the "(positive) Divine laws." Furthermore, Lawrence discourses additional political relations to the Catholic Church.

People to People: A Choice and a Promise

Dr. King addresses the idea that American people of all races have a choice to make this nation a great society.

Press Release for the Southern Negro Leaders Conference

Dr. King, Rev. C.K. Steele, and Rev. F. L. Shuttlesworth called for an emergency conference to strategize and unify further bus desegregation efforts in the south. This is the press release announcing the meeting of the Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-violent Integration. The agenda was ambitious, but specific and explicit. One of the outcomes of the meeting was the formation of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, with Dr. King chosen to lead.

Questions and Answers on the Civil Rights Act of 1967

This document contains questions and answers on the proposed Civil Rights Act of 1967 regarding federal and state jury trials, equal employment, fair housing, protection against interference with constitutional rights, and extending the life of the civil rights commission.

Resolution of the SCLC Board of Directors

The SCLC Board of Directors issues a resolution at its Tenth Annual Convention that lists what it considers "flagrant injustices" which violate the rights of American workers. As part of the resolution, the SCLC requests that Congress make corrections to the National Labor Relations Act.

Russell H. Bull $1000 Scholarship

This pamphlet provides information on the Russell Bull $1,000 scholarship that is awarded by the United Packinghouse Food and Allied Workers, AFL-CIO. The annual scholarship is awarded to a high school or college student in financial need who displays outstanding contributions in civil rights. Dr. King is listed as one of the members of the Public Review Advisory Commission that administers the scholarship.

SCLC Booklet

This booklet describes the programs and actions of the SCLC. It explains why it is a movement organization as well as defining the King-Abernathy tradition.

SCLC Financial Report

Ralph D. Abernathy releases the Southern Christian Leadership Conference Annual Fiscal Report for 1962-1963.

SCLC Newsletter: August 1963

This is volume one of the SCLC Newsletter, printed for the month and year of August 1963. Several topics are covered including; the March on Washington, Rebuilding Bombed Churches, the WCLC, and Negro voting registration.

Telegram from David Livingston to MLK

David Livingston and Cleveland Robinson, on behalf of their district of the AFL-CIO, send encouragement to Dr. King.

Telegram from Harry Van Arsdale, Jr. to MLK

Harry Van Arsdale, President of the New York City Central Labor Council AFL-CIO, informs Dr. King, who is in the Fulton County Jail, that ten thousand unionists in New York voted to support Dr. King's fight for "decency and democracy." The organization contributes $1000 to aid Dr. King in his efforts.

Telegram from Phil Lenud to MLK

Phil Lenud sends a telegram to Dr. King expressing that Reverend Andrew Young will telegraph him.

Telegram from Teamsters Vice President Harold Gibbons to MLK

International Brotherhood of Teamsters Vice President Harold Gibbons conveys his support to Dr. King for a statewide Mississippi boycott. Gibbons congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize.

Telegram from UFT President Albert Shanker to MLK

Albert Shanker expresses his appreciation to Dr. King for his support throughout the tumultuous 1967 education crisis in New York City.

The Dilemma of White America

This early draft of the Racism and the White Backlash chapter of Dr. King's Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? explores the history and philosophy of white supremacy. King insists the current status of Negroes is the direct result of oppression by whites, who have developed delusional beliefs to justify their historic acts of colonization and slavery.

The Domestic Impact of the War in America

In his address to the National Labor Leadership Assembly for Peace, Dr. King parallels the war in Vietnam to the injustice and violence inflicted on urban dwelling American Negroes "goaded and infuriated by discrimination and neglect." King implores Congress and the Johnson Administration to reassess the nation's domestic priorities and institute anti-poverty programs, so that the Great Society does not deteriorate into a "troubled and confused society."

The Future of Integration

Dr. King discusses "The Future of Integration." King opens with background history of three distinct periods of race relations. The first period extends from 1619 to 1862, the era of slavery. The next period extends from 1863 to 1954 when blacks were emancipated, but still segregated. The third period started on May 17, 1954 when segregation was deemed unconstitutional and integration commenced. Furthermore, Dr. King explains the changes that occurred as a result of integration and how it will affect blacks and whites in the future.

The Influence of the Right and Left in the Civil Rights Movement

Activist Bayard Rustin prepared these remarks for the Negro Leadership Conference in New York in January 1965. He discusses the influence of the American right, the traditional Communist left and the unaffiliated left (the Thirties veterans and the spontaneous left of Harlem and Mississippi).

The Other America

Dr. King delivered this speech, "The Other America," for the Local 1199 Salute to Freedom program. The speech emphasized the need to address poverty, the Vietnam War, and race relations in America.

The SCLC and Leadership of MLK

The various protest mechanisms and action organizations serves as a long lasting contribution to the Negro community initiated by the movement in the South. The church has served as a location for organization which progresses community participation. During slavery, the slaves were allowed to congregate only at weddings and funerals. Many of these events were fabricated in order to create a means of collective communication between the slaves. The author asserts that it was in this tradition that the SCLC was formed.

The Sound of Freedom

The Greater Philadelphia Citizens Committee is having an event with Dr. King as their guest speaker and special musical performances by artist such as Mahalia Jackson.

The State of SANE

H. Stuart Hughes, Chairman of the National Committee for a SANE Nuclear Policy, writes this report to the board, sponsors and chapters of the organization. Hughes notifies his readers that SANE's policy making body is being renewed due to newly elected regional and national members. Also, the Board adopted a detailed statement of a strategy, which places top priority on promoting an alternative to President Johnson and his Vietnam War policy. Other events include the update of a successful Labor Leadership Assembly for Peace and guest speaker Norman Thomas.

Two Americas

This essay highlights the realities of poverty stricken aliens in an affluent society. Through its examination of Negro-white relations, urban riots, and the War on Poverty, the author insists that the nonviolent struggle for civil rights must continue.

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