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Southern Christian Leadership Conference--Threats

Associated Archive Content : 8 results

Adverse Letter from R. Johnson to MLK

R. Johnson writes to Dr. King wishing physical violence against him. The author refers to Dr. King as "Big Mouth."

Fact Sheet on the Raid of the SCEF

This document highlights the raid on the New Orleans headquarters of the Southern Conference Educational Fund by State and City Police.

MLK Requests Federal Protection from US Attorney General

Dr. King sends this urgent request for protection to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach. Negro citizens were brutalized while protesting the arrest of James Orange. Alabama State Troopers prevented protestors from seeking medical attention by refusing to allow them to leave Zion Methodist Church.

SCLC Newsletter: October-November 1965

This SCLC newsletter depicts the courage of SCLC workers putting their lives on the line while fighting for civil rights. The newsletter also highlights pictures from SCLC's ninth annual convention in Birmingham Alabama and a children's book about Dr. King.

SCLC's Operation Breadbasket - Quarterly Report

The SCLC issued this comprehensive quarterly report on the activities of Operation Breadbasket. Operation Breadbasket focused on acquiring jobs and economic development for the Negro community through contract negotiations and boycotts.

Telegram Called in From Attorney General Nicholas Deb Katzenbach to MLK

Katzenbach responds to an urgent telegram from Dr. King concerning State Troopers that had trapped Demonstrators inside a church and refused to let them obtain medical attention. Katzenbach tells Dr. King that he is aware of the situation and that the Department Attorneys and the FBI were already on the scene in both Selma and Marion and investigations had already begun.

Telegram from MLK and Wyatt Walker to Burke Marshall

Dr. King and Wyatt Walker send an urgent request for Burke Marshall to investigate the bombing of SCLC Board Member C. O. Simpkins' home in Shreveport, Louisiana. The two SCLC officials inform Mr. Marshall that the suspects were released for lack of evidence despite other information to the contrary.

The SCLC and Leadership of MLK

The various protest mechanisms and action organizations serves as a long lasting contribution to the Negro community initiated by the movement in the South. The church has served as a location for organization which progresses community participation. During slavery, the slaves were allowed to congregate only at weddings and funerals. Many of these events were fabricated in order to create a means of collective communication between the slaves. The author asserts that it was in this tradition that the SCLC was formed.