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American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa

The American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa (ANLCA) formed in 1962 following a conference on The Role of the American Negro Community in U.S. Policy Toward Africa at Columbia University. Dr. King and A. Philip Randolph were co-chairs and Theodore Brown director. ANCLA was supported by 28 national organizations. The group advocated for the freedom, independence and human rights of the African people. At the 1962 conference, King drew parallels between freedom struggles in Africa and the American South and expressed concern about U.S. political and economic policies toward the continent. ANCLA was outspoken on racial policies in southern Africa and deeply concerned about the Nigeria-Biafra civil war. It planned a peace delegation to Nigeria for April 1968; King was killed on April 4. ANCLA disbanded in 1968.

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Associated Archive Content : 25 results

American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa Contributors List

This is a list of the organizations that contributed to the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa.

American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa Memorandum

Theodore Brown, Executive Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, provides a progress report on ANLCA's work on Nigeria, Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) and Southwest Africa (now Namibia). He mentions that the group offered to help the Nigerian federal government and the four regions mediate the conflict that resulted in the Nigeria-Biafra Civil War (1967-1970).

American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa: Advance Registration

Theodore E. Brown, the Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, sends a letter with attached registration forms for the Third Biennial National Conference.

Four Top Rights Leaders Considering Africa Trip

Roy Wilkins, Dr. King, Whitney Young, and A. Philip Randolph, four of America's top civil rights leaders, are considering making a trip to Africa to stop the war in Nigeria. These leaders also serve as members on the call committee of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa.

Letter from Aggrey Oji to Theodore Brown

Mr. Oji writes Mr. Brown thanking him for a previous correspondence of support regarding various issues in Nigeria. Mr. Oji also offers to meet with Mr. Brown and other members of the American Negro Leadership Conference to discuss further issues.

Letter from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Roy Wilkins, of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, wrote Dr. King to explain his increasing concern over the violence in Nigeria. Wilkins requests Dr. King's presence for a meeting with Nigerian Leaders to discuss the possibilities of ending the hostilities.

Letter from Roy Wilkins to the Honorable Dean Rusk

In this letter, Roy Wikins extends an invitation to Sec. of State, Dean Rusk, to attend a meeting of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa.

Letter from S. O. Adebo to Theodore Brown

S. O. Adebo, a permanent representative of the Permanent Mission of Nigeria to the United Nations, requests a meeting with Mr. Brown and his colleagues. Mr. Brown is the Executive Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa. This letter references the Nigeria-Biafra situation, which Dr. King was deeply concerned about.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK

Theodore Brown, Executive Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, writes Dr. King to invite him to a meeting with members of the British Parliament to discuss the developing racial crisis in their country. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK

In a letter to Dr. King, Mr. Brown encloses an article pertaining to Nigeria being on the brink of disintegration and civil war.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK

Theodore Brown writes Dr. King requesting his signature on a telegram to President Johnson from the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa expressing disapproval of South Africa's rule over South West Africa and requesting U.S. support for turning over administration to the United Nations.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK

The American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa writes an uplifting message to General Yakubu Gowon of Lagos, Nigeria. They extend a "hand in friendship" to bring the war in Nigeria to an end.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK and Others

This is a memorandum from Theodore E. Brown concerning his trip to Nigeria. Brown attaches a newspaper article referencing the turmoil in Nigeria.

Letter from Theodore E. Brown to Conference Participants

In this letter, Director Theodore E. Brown notifies the conference participants of the rescheduling for the Third National Biennial Leadership.

Letter from Theodore E. Brown to MLK

The Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference On Africa sent this letter to update Dr. King and other committee members about plans for the third national biennial leadership conference.

Letter from Theodore E. Brown to MLK and Others

Mr. Theodore Brown informs Dr. King and other members of the ANLCA's call committee of vaccinations required when traveling internationally.

Memo from Theodore Brown

Mr. Brown informs several African American leaders, including Dr. King, of his attempts to raise funds for the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa.

Memorandum from Theodore Brown to MLK and Others

Theodore Brown informs Dr. King and other civil rights leaders of a previous letter to President Johnson regarding United States-Africa relations.

Memorandum from Theodore E. Brown Regarding 1968 Trip to Nigeria

Theodore E. Brown, the director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, reports the results of his recent trip to Nigeria to members of the Call Committee.

MLK's Address to American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa

Drawing connections between the social injustices of two continents, Dr. King discusses the relationship between segregation in America and colonialism in Africa. Dr. King also shares his opinion about America dominating Africa politically and economically.

Negro Leaders Urge Force Against Rhodesia

The American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa calls for all news media and wireless services to broadcast the release of "Negro Leaders Urge Force Against Rhodesia." This call to action was prompted by racial rebellions led by Ian Smith. It was the hope of civil rights leaders to strengthen "Negro" and African relations by increasing support of peace in Africa.

People to People: The Negro Looks at Africa

In his column in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King reports on the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa that brought together a cross-section of the Negro community to discuss foreign policy toward Africa. He writes that colonialism and segregation are siblings and that the future of the emerging nations of Africa and the American Negro are interrelated. He speaks of the contradictions in policy toward Africa, the need for more Negroes in the diplomatic corps, and the importance of action by the Administration against racism at home and racism in US foreign policy.

Telegram from American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa to President Johnson

Members of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa express their disapproval of South Africa's rule over South West Africa and ask for U.S. intervention.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Mr. Wilkins, Chairman of the Call Committee, writes to assure Dr. King's participation in an upcoming conference. Worldwide interest is developing and Dr. King's presence and leadership is very important.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Mr. Wilkins invites Dr. King to attend a meeting with Dr. K. O. Mbadiwe, former Nigerian Minister, and other Negro leaders in the United States to discuss the increasing conflict in Nigeria.