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Government aid

Associated Archive Content : 72 results

SCLC Resolution "To Fulfill These Rights"

The SCLC releases a copy of the resolution, "To Fulfill These Rights," created by the SCLC's Alabama staff and sent to the White House Conference. Hosea Williams states in the resolution that Negroes who voted in the primary were intimidated by white segregationist to not vote in the run-off.

SCLC Voter Registration Report

After having a successful election year as a result of voter registration in Georgia and Tennessee in 1962, the SCLC decided to approach the whole South in attempting to get African Americans to vote. This report gives an overview of the voting situation at that time across the southern states. Other organizations, such as SNCC and the Southwide Voter Education Project, are also referenced as key organizations who helped influenced voter registration.

SCLC: Summary Of Ninth Annual Convention

This summary of the SCLC's Ninth Annual Convention describes events that were instrumental in the formation of the organization. The document outlines the ongoing projects of the organization and offers proposals for future efforts.

Senate Subcommittee on Urban Reorganization Statement

In a hearing on the plight of inner cities, Dr. King focuses on injustices in the urban ghettoes, stating that the problem is not primarily a race issue but an economic one. He calls for a rebalancing of national priorities and links the plight of America's poor to the squandering of resources on war.

The Dilemma of Negro Americans

In this draft of a chapter for his book Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?, Dr. King offers an in-depth description of the plight of African Americans over the past few hundred years and how it will never be fully understood by their white counterparts. He recounts the issues associated with American slavery – the dehumanization of slaves and the destruction of the family unit. He ties what happened in the past to what is occurring in the present, explaining that because of these layers of oppression African Americans have to play catch up to be seen as equals in America.

The Domestic Impact of the War in America

In his address to the National Labor Leadership Assembly for Peace, Dr. King parallels the war in Vietnam to the injustice and violence inflicted on urban dwelling American Negroes "goaded and infuriated by discrimination and neglect." King implores Congress and the Johnson Administration to reassess the nation's domestic priorities and institute anti-poverty programs, so that the Great Society does not deteriorate into a "troubled and confused society."

The Minority Can Afford Adequate Housing

Mr. Borden writes to inform readers of the housing inequalities in Dade County. Borden ultimately explains that the problem extends from not a singular reason, but from a mixture of social and economic ills. He believes that if the focus was shifted from building expensive commercial buildings to investing in ordinary neighborhoods, there would be significant improvement. This also serves as a call to action for those who agree with the information to mail it to their representatives in Congress.

U.S. News & World Report: Negro Leaders Tell Their Plans for '64

Past, present and future efforts in the area of civil rights are discussed in interviews of five organizational leaders in the civil rights movement. These leaders are: Whitney M. Young, Jr. of the National Urban League, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. of the SCLC, Roy Wilkins of the NAACP, James L. Farmer of CORE, and James Forman of SNCC.

United States Department of Agriculture

This document references Secretary Orville L. Freeman's speech regarding administrative programs to improve food assistance and nutrition. One of the programs that is discussed is the School Breakfast Program, which will make free breakfast available to thousands of children. Other programs are also mentioned and described as the document proceeds.

Waste in Foreign Aid

Irene M. Kashmer suggests Dr. King address the issue of wasted foreign aid in his march on Washington. She encloses a New York Times article from February 15, 1967 to emphasize her point.

We Have No Government

This is a transcription of a press conference held on behalf of the poor people in Mississippi. Leaders and participants discussed alternatives to government aid to help rectify poverty related concerns.

You and the Poor People's Campaign

This document contains detailed information regarding the Poor People's Campaign. This document also discusses the Satyagraha movement, a nonviolent movement that means "truth force."

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