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United States. Congress

Associated Archive Content : 457 results

"Barnett Says JFK Aids Reds"

In a testimony before the Senate Commerce Committee, Mississippi Governor Ross R. Barnett expresses his staunch opposition to President Kennedy's recent civil rights legislation. Governor Barnett goes as far as to associate recent Communist Party activities to the recent "racial agitation, strife, and conflict" emerging from the Civil Rights Movement.

"Dr. King Warns Against the Riots"

Eugene Patterson, of the Atlanta Constitution, transcribed his analysis of Dr. King's final publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Mr. Patterson evaluated Dr. King's views on riots and agreed that riots did not produce any solid improvements to solve the problems in the Negro community.

400 Years of Bigotry and Hate

Dr. King describes the efforts of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference involvement in the civil rights campaign, May-July of 1964, in St. Augustine, Florida. The excerpted article is taken from the SCLC Newsletter.

A Look to 1964

This is a draft of the article "A Look to 1964" written by Dr. King. Published on January 1, 1964 in the New York Amsterdam News. In the article, Dr. King addresses the strides the African American people have taken towards the struggle for equality.

A Statement to the South and Nation

The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement. The document states that a world-wide campaign for social and political freedom shows an international plight for human dignity. As America is one of the two most powerful nations in the world, "the unresolved problem of civil rights becomes the most crucial issue." There is contradiction between the freedom America proclaims and the actual practice of civil liberties and democracy. Dr.

A Statement to the South and Nation

This seemingly unexceptional document signifies the birth of the SCLC. Dr. King, Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth and Rev. C. K. Steele assembled a consortium of leaders in Atlanta following the end of the Montgomery Bus Boycott. The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement that addresses the intimidation, discrimination and economic disparity Negroes face in the South. The statement appeals to the federal government to intervene against assaults that block basic civil rights.

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Address by Jackie Robinson at SCLC Freedom Dinner

Guest speaker Jackie Robinson discusses his personal struggles with adopting the philosophy of nonviolence, race relations and the far-reaching efforts of the SCLC.

Address by MLK at SCLC Ministers Conference

Dr. King addresses those in attendance at the Southern Christian Ministers Conference. He brings words of encouragement to those working diligently for social change in Mississippi. He speaks words of promise that things will change since the Supreme Court has ruled segregation unconstitutional and he gives examples of how things are slowly changing. However, he acknowledges that there is still much work to be done, especially in the South. Dr. King lists actions that must be at the top of everyone's list to be taken care of.

Address By Senator Edward M. Kennedy to the SCLC

Senator Edward M. Kennedy highlights Dr. King's efforts during the Civil Rights Movement. He also expresses concerns about poverty, unemployment, nonviolence, segregation and integrity.

Address Given by Vice President Nixon in Chicago, Illinois

This document contains the text of an address given by Vice President Richard Nixon at the Joint Defense Appeal of the American Jewish Committee and the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith. He expresses what can be done and what laws should be passed to make sure others are not further abused.

Address on Anti-Poverty by Jerome P. Cavanagh

Jerome P. Cavanagh, Mayor of Detroit, delivers this speech before the Office of Economic Opportunity Urban Areas Conference, Great Lakes Region. The conference is dedicated to sharing experiences in the War on Poverty and taking a realistic assessment on the issues in urban areas. Inadequate education, food, housing, and disjointed welfare systems are major problems of concern. Cavanagh encourages the analysis of programs addressing these situations. He also advocates an understanding of federal aid cutbacks and connects insufficient funds to the Vietnam War and space exploration.

An Appeal by Puerto Ricans for Fair Treatment

This document reviews the economic, political, and cultural disparity of Puerto Ricans. The authors explain the history of American imperialism in Puerto Rico and how Puerto Ricans have been mistreated in the United States, particularly in New York. Criticizing the Vietnam War, the authors suggest focusing the funding used abroad on community building.

An Open Letter to Congress from John H. Murphy III

John H. Murphy III, president of the National Newspaper Publishers Association, urges Congress to pass the Anti-poverty Bill, because voting down the bill would be "cruel and inhumane."

Annual Report Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Operation Breadbasket, unemployment, poverty, nonviolence, Negro voter registration, and a financial report are just several of the topics covered in this informational pamphlet detailing the ways in which monies were divided amongst the many functions of the SCLC.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The sender of this letter lists six main goals that should be accomplished in 1968. The sender pleads for Dr. King to take leadership in accomplishing these goals.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Dr. King received this letter from an individual who urges that both poverty and the Vietnam War should be ended by helping Americans and building up communities, and then sending peaceful volunteers to South Vietnam to do the same. The author, who has several family members in the service, chooses not to sign their name, fearing retribution, and states that they wish to broadcast this message around the world.

Anonymous Letter to President Johnson

The anonymous sender of this letter urges President Lyndon B. Johnson to take action to fund programs in order to get people in school or at work in order to quell rising tensions in cities filled with people dissatisfied with their social and economic positions.

Anonymous Postcard to MLK Regarding the Vietnam War

An anonymous individual conveys to Dr. King his frustrations with President Johnson and the Vietnam War.

Answers in the American Way

This text derives from a television show outlining the facts of the Black Panther Party. In attendance were civil rights activist like Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, H. Rapp Brown and their affiliates within the Civil Rights Movement.

Anti-Poverty Bill

This document outlines and provides the status of the Anti-Poverty legislation in Congress.

Anti-Poverty Expenditures that Cheat Federal Taxpayers and the Poor

Harry G. and Elizabeth R. Brown express their concerns about housing in America. They claim that while open housing will help Negroes who can afford it, those who cannot will continue to live in slums. They pose the idea of reforming the tax policy as a solution to this problem.

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy on House Resolution 7152

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy comments on House Bill 7152, the bill that eventually culminated in the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Kennedy argues that the bill is a "test" to white Americans and that it must "effectively eliminate racial discrimination in voting, education and in employment." He addresses the eleven titles of the bill and describes the differences between the current bill and the version introduced by the president. Kennedy finally asserts that if the bill is not passed, then "the whole nation will be the loser."

B.F. Randolph

B.F. Randolph, African American preacher and member of the South Carolina Legislature, is honored in this statement for his work against racial discrimination. The documents states that Mr. Randolph fought for the words 'irrespective of race and color,' to be included in the Bill of Rights.

Background Information on March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

This passage provides a reason as to why the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom had to occur. The Brown vs. Board Supreme Court decision, the Prayer Pilgrimage, and other peaceful demonstrations all resulted in the march.

Bond and The Constitution

The author of this article argues that the Georgia State Legislature's refusal to seat Horace Julian Bond represents a great injustice. The author asserts that Mr. Bond was refused a seat due to his views on American foreign policy and the issue of race.

Catholic Interracial Council Newsletter Honoring MLK

This 1965 newsletter from the Catholic Interracial Council honors Dr. King with the Pacem in Terris Peace and Freedom Award.

Christianity and Crisis: April 3, 1967

Roger L. Shinn wrote this article for Christianity and Crisis: A Christian Journal of Opinion. Shinn defines a "conscientious objector" as one who believes a war morally unjustifiable, and chooses, therefore, not to serve in it. Several Christian organizations attempted to introduce legislation banning forced participation. The American Civil Liberties Union has encouraged the selective service system to recognize a policy "under which no person shall be compelled to participate in armed conflict when he believes it to be in violation of his conscience."

Citizens Crusade Against Poverty: Policies and Programs

This booklet outlining the priorities, policies, and programs of the Citizens Crusade Against Poverty.

Civil Rights Act of 1957

The Civil Rights Act was signed into law on September 9, 1957 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Commonly referred to as the Civil Rights Act of 1957, this was the first such federal law since Reconstruction. The law was aimed at ending voter discrimination tactics such as poll taxes and literacy tests, but it also created the Civil Rights Commission to ensure proper administration of the law.

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