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Elijah Muhammad, 1897-1975

Associated Archive Content : 7 results

A Memo from the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE)

This memorandum written by Lincoln Lynch, Associate Director of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), outlines proposed travel arrangements, speakers, workshop topics and entertainment for the upcoming National Convention.

Letter from Ali Beno Veidt to MLK

Comparing Black Muslims to Nazis, Veidt speaks against Dr. King's practices in the movement, as well as his involvement with Elijah Muhammad. Veidt's correspondence includes a photograph of the two men together.

Letter from Elijah Muhammad to MLK

In this letter, Elijah Muhammad expresses the importance of black unity in the efforts for equality. Elijah Muhammad requests the presence of Dr. King and other prominent civil rights leaders at a meeting to discuss solutions to the ongoing struggle against injustice.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Joan Daves, Literary Agent to Dr. King, addresses the correspondence, to Dr. King. The letter includes photostats of reviews for Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The Chicago Tribune, New York Times Daily and Washington Star are just a couple of the newspapers that published reviews for the book.

Telegram from MLK to Elijah Muhammed

Dr. King commends Muhammad Ali's conscientious objection to the Vietnam War. He encourages Elijah Muhammed to convince Ali to speak at the upcoming Tenth Annual Convention of SCLC.

The New York Times: Books of The Times Storm Warnings

Eliot Fremont-Smith examines Dr. King's stance on the term of Black Power, his views on political power for Negroes and his focus on nonviolence.

The Witness: MLK Writes from Birmingham Jail

"The Witness" publishes the second part of Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham City Jail." In this pivotal document, Dr. King expresses dissatisfaction with the white moderate and the white church regarding their silent stance on segregation and discrimination. He urges individuals to understand the delays, broken promises, and intimidation Negroes face to secure their freedom.