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Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Associated Archive Content : 15 results

Address by MLK to the National Press Club

During an address to the National Press Club in Washington, Dr. King declares the time for racial justice has arrived.

Albany Student Penalty Stressed

Approximately 40 African American students were suspended from school and charged for participating in mob action. The students were suspended for taking part in an anti-segregation demonstration to Albany City Hall. The demonstration included White students as well but they were not punished for their actions. The 40 students planned to appeal their cases to the federal court.

Bold Design for a New South

Dr. King notes that civil rights has been replaced as the "Number One" domestic issue, dwarfed by the Cuban missile crisis, trade legislation and tax reform. He attributes this to public acceptance of tokenism as well as an overly cautious administration. While acknowledging that the administration has made greater efforts on civil rights than previous ones, Dr. King says the progress is constricted and confined.

Brotherhood Cannot Be a Theory

This newspaper clipping of The Southern Israelite features segments on the Atlanta banquet honoring Dr. King's acceptance of the Nobel Peace Prize. Given on his return to the States, there were twelve hundred and fifty Atlanta citizens in attendance. Included articles are: welcoming comments by Rabbi Jacob Rothschild, a tribute by Archbishop Paul Hallinan, and a transcription of Dr. King's speech.

Dignity Is the Best Way

The Atlanta Constitution writes about Dr. King serving a five day sentence for contempt of court in Birmingham.

Letter from MLK to Halvey Simmons

Dr. King writes Halvey Simmons expressing thanks for his interest and concern regarding the burning of several churches in Atlanta, Georgia. He continues by stating the intent to rebuild the churches with funding created by the Atlanta Journal Constitution.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Eugene Patterson

Dr. King addresses Mr. Patterson's editorials discussing "sincere questions and doubts" about Dr. King's stance on the conflict in Vietnam.

Memo From Dora McDonald to MLK

Miss Dora Mcdonald provides a brief summary of phone calls to Dr. King and the context of each.

SCLC Answers Attorney General Cook

Mr. Clayton releases a statement concerning accusations made against Dr. King. In the statement, Georgia Attorney General Eugene Cook states that Dr. King refused to give him information him concerning a known communist named Jack O'Dell. Dr. King confirms that he has, in fact, cooperated with Cook and that O'Dell no longer works for the organization.

Statement From MLK In Response To Article Alleging Communist Ties

This press release issued by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference features a Statement by Dr. King responding to allegations that he and the SCLC has communist ties. Dr. King argues that the SCLC is grounded in the Christian non-violent movement with the intent of reform, wherease communism leads to violent revolution.

Statement from the Commission on Civil Rights

Clarence H. Hunter issued this statement to share the news that the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights would be holding a public hearing in Montgomery, Alabama to collect information regarding the condition of African Americans in Alabama. Hunter states the purpose of the Commission's investigation and names the notable members of the investigation.

The Atlanta Constitution: Dr. King Warns Against the Riots

Eugene Patterson describes Dr. King's position against violent race riots and the consequences of these movements on the Black and White community.

The Dexter Echo: Not Guilty!

This article states that Dr. King was found not guilty for tax evasion charges. The state's tax agent refused to lie under oath or allow prejudice to sway the facts.

The New York Times: New Way Sought to Teach Rights

Columbia University and its Teachers College plan to begin a nationwide initiative to improve the teaching of civil rights. The plan will not only apply to elementary and secondary schools but also to college, universities and adult education forums. Instead of using textbooks, teachers will utilize case studies and films to keep information up to date.

The Student Movement and You

This handbill calls for a boycott on Rich's and A & P in response to their discriminatory practices in employment and services to the Negro population of Atlanta, Georgia.