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Selma (Ala.) Race relations

Associated Archive Content : 58 results

Address by MLK to the Hungry Club

Dr. King addresses the members of The Hungry Club on the dilemma of "Negroes" obtaining complete equality. He refers to several passages from his "I Have a Dream" speech.

Alabama SCLC July 1966 Report

Albert Turner of the Alabama SCLC delivers a report on upcoming and continuing programs of the local SCLC. Some of the programs include political action and a SCLC convention.

American Journal: Let Justice Roll Down

Carey McWilliams writes to Dr. King to inform him his article, "Let Justice Roll Down," was included in the American Journal, a publication by the US Information Service aimed at representing opinions and current subjects of interest in the United States. This edition, published in 1965, was he 5th year in a row Dr. King had contributed an article describing the tempo of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States.

Annual Report Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Operation Breadbasket, unemployment, poverty, nonviolence, Negro voter registration, and a financial report are just several of the topics covered in this informational pamphlet detailing the ways in which monies were divided amongst the many functions of the SCLC.

Black Power

This is a chapter sermon for Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here?" The civil rights leader traces the early development of Black Power and its eventual surge onto the national political scene. Though understood as a direct opposition to the nonviolent movement that organizations like SCLC, CORE, and SNCC originally supported, King describes Black Power as a "disappointment wrapped in despair."

Black Power: Two Views

James Peck, a white civil rights activist, writes an article concerning the path of the Civil Rights Movement. He is beginning to notice that black power and black racism are taking over organizations that had been focused on nonviolence and racial equality.

Do the Following to Keep National Attention Focused on Selma

Dr. King composes a list of activities that will keep national attention focused on Selma. Written on Waldorf Astoria Hotel stationary, the list includes measures such as contacting top level government officials like President Johnson, organizing a march, and enlisting the help of celebrities. Dr. King concludes the list by emphasizing "We must insist that voting is the issue and here Selma has dirty hands."

Howard University Charter Day Observance

Howard University celebrates its' Charter Day Observance with a program that includes a speech by Dr. King. The program also acknowledges the recipients of the Alumni Achievement Award. Such individuals include Ossie Davis and Leroy F. Florant.

Invitation from Clarence Williams to MLK

Clarence Williams invites Dr. King to a campaign kick-off rally sponsored by the Dallas County Independent Free Voters Organization.

Join the Ranks! Support A Worker

An SCLC field worker writes to gain support for the SCLC so that the organization can fulfill its mission to help blacks "achieve full citizenship rights, stimulate nonviolent mass action, and secure the right to vote."

Letter from Adie Marks to Harry Belafonte

Adie Marks writes Harry Belafonte in an effort to organize an event consisting of several artists and organizations to combat issues African Americans face in America.

Letter from Charles Harris to MLK

Pastor Charles Harris of the Calvary Baptist Church encloses a check to Dr. King in support of the Selma to Montgomery March. He regrets his inability to participate in the march due to his wife's illness.

Letter from Charles McC. Mathias, Jr. to MLK

Maryland Congressman Charles M. Mathias thanks Dr. King for his letter regarding the Representative's recent trip to Selma, Alabama. As a result of his visit, Congressman Mathias informs Dr. King that he prepared and introduced civil rights legislation to the latest House of Representatives session.

Letter from Charles Woodall to MLK

Charles Woodall, representing the All Souls Unitarian Church of Santa Cruz, California, congratulates Dr. King on his efforts in the fight for freedom. Woodall explains that he is a Georgia native that once lived in Selma, Alabama in the early 1900's. At the time of this letter the SCLC and SNCC were in the middle of a massive Negro voter registration campaign in Selma, Alabama.

Letter from David L. Clark and Charles E. Young to MLK

David Clark and Charles E. Young of the University of California Los Angeles write to Dr. King to ask him to speak to the UCLA student body. They express that their students are very interested in the Civil Rights Movement and have planned an entire "Selma Week" to correspond with his speech and raise money for the Selma Movement.

Letter from Don Edwards to MLK

Representative Don Edwards of California sends his gratitude to Dr. King for a recent letter. Edwards informs Dr. King that they are currently drafting legislation to amend the Civil Rights Act.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mary V. Leath

Dora McDonald informs Mary Leath of Dr. King's current incarceration in Selma, Alabama. McDonald also tells Leath that her request will be brought to Dr. King's attention upon his return.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Joan Daves, Literary Agent to Dr. King, addresses the correspondence, to Dr. King. The letter includes photostats of reviews for Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The Chicago Tribune, New York Times Daily and Washington Star are just a couple of the newspapers that published reviews for the book.

Letter from L. H. Stibbards to MLK

Mr. Stibbards sends a donation and words of encouragement from the McMaster Divinity Student's Association. He assures Dr. King that their members are at Dr. King's service.

Letter from L. Serron to MLK

L. Serron writes to Dr. King requesting materials on the Selma Demonstration and the March on Montgomery for class usage.

Letter from Lawrence J. Rozman to MLK

Lawrence J. Rozman, who identifies himself as a white Catholic, is in admiration of Dr. King's avenue of execution to the racial issues in the United States. In addition, Mr. Rozman requests to become a member of the SCLC.

Letter from Louis V. Sharples to MLK

Rev. Louis Sharples writes Dr. King to enclose a financial contribution on behalf of the Church of St. Alban the Martyn. Rev. Sharples expresses their awareness and concern for those negatively impacted by the march in Selma and hope their contribution can offer some assistance.

Letter from MLK to Bishop Randolph Clairborne

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation to Bishop Randolph Clairborne for his contribution to a dinner held in King's honor. The City of Atlanta sponsored a dinner for Dr. King in honor of his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from MLK to Congressman Ogden R. Reid

Dr. King informs Congressman Reid (R-New York) of the positive impact he left on Negro citizens during his visit to Selma, Alabama.

Letter from MLK to John Conyers

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for Congressman John Conyers' visit to Selma, Alabama. Dr. King requests Congressman Conyers' support for passing federal legislation that will eliminate the barriers to a free voting process for African American citizens.

Letter from Pastor Paul S. Barru to MLK

The pastor of First Presbyterian Church in Glenwood Springs, Colorado sends the SCLC a contribution on behalf of his church and the Denver Christian Center. He references a recent Wilcox County, Alabama tour which he feels reflects the type of "creative" activity that is most beneficial for exposing "a window into the rural South for the ignorant North."

Letter from Representative James H. Scheuer to MLK

Congressman James Scheuer (D-New York) writes Dr. King that he believes progress is finally being made in Selma, Alabama, and he congratulations Dr. Kin on his excellent leadership.

Letter from Rev. Lane Barton to MLK

Rev. Lane Barton, on behalf of Rev. James Pike and the St. Barnabas Episcopal Mission, corresponds with Dr. King in relation to their recent journey to Selma. In this positive affirmation Rev. Barton states, "I pray that the spirit of the living God which is going to and fro in the land and walking up and down in it will grasp us all and refashion us into one truly free and united republic."

Letter from Robert Bondy to MLK

Though a long time supporter of Dr. King, Robert Bondy, criticizes for Dr. King for mixing the issues of civil rights and Vietnam. He argues that speaking out against Vietnam has only further inflamed opponents of the Civil Rights Movement, and Dr. King has thrown back the movment "for a long time to come."

Letter from SCLC to Lizzie Williams

A representative of the Citizenship Education Program, an initiative of the SCLC, informs Mrs. Willis of recent travel plans to Dorchester, GA. Dorchester academy played a vital role in the struggle for voting and civil rights.

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