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African Americans - Civil rights.

Associated Archive Content : 330 results

"Green Power" for Negroes

This SCLC news release documents the success of "a pioneer agreement between the Chicago Freedom Movement and a large grocery chain." As a product of Operation Breadbasket, this development cycled both jobs and capital to keep them organic to the Negro community.

"We're Here Because We're Tired"

Civil rights leader Andrew Young expresses the collective frustration of the African-American community concerning employment discrimination, housing segregation, and the welfare system.

24th Annual Blue Ribbon Tea

Woodlawn Community Services Agency issues an invitation to come to the 24th Annual Blue Ribbon Tea where Dr. King will be honored.

A Background Paper for the Delaware Conference on Equal Opportunity in Housing

This paper is intended to catalyze discussion at the Delaware Conference on Equal Opportunity in Housing. By providing facts and analysis pertaining to Wilmington and surrounding areas, the paper is written to help familiarize attendees of the housing situation in Delaware. A key goal is to educate on the racial disparity and deterioration of urban areas. "The national housing objective is to provide decent, safe, and sanitary housing to all people" and this document encourages the execution of developed solutions.

A Look to 1964

This is a draft of the article "A Look to 1964" written by Dr. King. Published on January 1, 1964 in the New York Amsterdam News. In the article, Dr. King addresses the strides the African American people have taken towards the struggle for equality.

A Program of Education in the Philosophy of Non-Violence

The American Foundation on Non-Violence and the SCLC outline a proposal to the Stern Family Fund to educate America on the philosophy of non-violence. The proposed program includes a semi-annual leadership seminar, community leaders conferences, and youth and student workshops.

A Resolution Directed to the African Methodist Episopal Church

This resolution endorses the appointment of Donald Jacobs as Bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Church.

Address by MLK at 47th NAACP Annual Convention

Dr. King addresses the audience at the 47th NAACP annual convention in San Francisco, California. King begins with background information of slavery and its physical and mental effects on Africans, then tells the "Montgomery Story." This story begins with a mental transformation among blacks, which led to the Montgomery boycott. As a result of the boycott, blacks were empowered and began fighting injustice and seeking changes in unfair legislation.

Address by MLK to the National Press Club

During an address to the National Press Club in Washington, Dr. King declares the time for racial justice has arrived.

Address for the Formation of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights

This address was delivered by Dr. King at the Formation of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights event on May 17, 1962. Dr. King opens by discussing various anniversaries that coincide with the event and represent similar struggles for justice including the Supreme Court school desegregation ruling, the Emancipation Proclamation, and Henry David Thoreau's death.

Albany Movement Position Paper

The Albany Movement expresses the damages of segregation and outlines their requests for peaceful integration.

American Journal: Let Justice Roll Down

Carey McWilliams writes to Dr. King to inform him his article, "Let Justice Roll Down," was included in the American Journal, a publication by the US Information Service aimed at representing opinions and current subjects of interest in the United States. This edition, published in 1965, was he 5th year in a row Dr. King had contributed an article describing the tempo of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States.

An Address by MLK at the 53rd Convention of the NAACP

Dr. King makes an address at the 53rd Convention of the National Association for the Advancement of Color People in Atlanta disputing the myths of the civil rights movement. In addition to expressing appreciation for the organization's work, Dr. King apologizes for the prejudice the NAACP had to endure in making accommodations for the conference in Atlanta.

Annual Report Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Operation Breadbasket, unemployment, poverty, nonviolence, Negro voter registration, and a financial report are just several of the topics covered in this informational pamphlet detailing the ways in which monies were divided amongst the many functions of the SCLC.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous supporter sends an encouraging letter to Dr. King.

Anti-Semitism, Israel and SCLC:- A Statement on Press Distortions

This is a document that addresses the impression that the press created reporting that the SCLC was part of a group that condemned Israel and endorsed the policies of the Arab powers. This document also includes the annual report of the president by Dr. King.

Article Written by MLK for The Progressive

In this unfinished draft of an article for The Progressive, Dr. King writes about the social ills of America through the context of what he calls the two most important documents in American history: the Declaration of Independence and the Emancipation Proclamation.

Biographical Sketches of Leaders of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

These are biographical sketches of various leaders who were involved in the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedoms. These distinguished individuals were involved in organizations that focused on equality and nonviolence.

Bloody Sunday

Dr. King recollects events that occurred on "Bloody Sunday" in Selma, Alabama as 525 blacks marching were tear-gassed, clubbed, and beaten by police officers and discusses how television helped the Civil Rights Movement. King asserts that the television helps us all be participants in vital matters and it adds trust and validity to the movement.

Bread at Midnight

"The Mennonite," issued by The Board of Education and Publication of the General Conference Mennonite Church, features an article by Dr. King entitled "Bread at Night." Dr. King begins with a parable that demonstrates not only the power of prayer, but provides metaphors for the state of America and thinking material for the role of the church during that time period.

Chicago Defender: My Dream

Dr. King writes this article for the Chicago Defender describing the social and economic climate of Chicago's ghettos. He explains that Ghettos are the site of economic exploitation and where no exchange of culture and resources are allowed to exist. SCLC staff and Reverend James Bevel "have come to see this as a system of internal colonialism." It is understood that slum culture is designed to perpetuate the inferior educational, health, housing, and employment states of the Negro.

Chicago Freedom Movement Tent-In

This flyer outlines the platform for the Chicago Freedom Movement's Tent-In. This organization, based out of Warrenville, Illinois, sought for equality in housing and was an initiative of the SCLC and Al Raby's Council of Federated Organizations.

Civil Rights Act of 1957

The Civil Rights Act was signed into law on September 9, 1957 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Commonly referred to as the Civil Rights Act of 1957, this was the first such federal law since Reconstruction. The law was aimed at ending voter discrimination tactics such as poll taxes and literacy tests, but it also created the Civil Rights Commission to ensure proper administration of the law.

Civil Rights Drive by SCLC and Other Groups Wins Open Housing Victory in Louisville

This 1967 SCLC news release details the passage of a law forbidding racial discrimination in housing in Louisville, Kentucky. It also details the role that SCLC and its sister organizations had in bring about this legislation.

Commission on Human Relations of the City of Pittsburgh

This is a preliminary report requesting an investigation on the cancellation of insurance coverage on business establishments and churches in Homewood-Brushton.

Conference on Strengthening the New Politiics

The Conference on Strengthening the New Politics was formed from a desire to have real constituencies who have control over their elected officials and a concern for local grassroots political development. It is the hope of this conference that the styles of liberalism and the Civil Rights Movement could come together to form a new elective politic.

Confidential Memorandum

This handwritten document outlines plans for the SCLC's Direct Action program. The program will target Birmingham, Alabama, Montgomery, Alabama and Danville, Virginia.

Convocation on Equal Justice Under the Law

This is a transcript of remarks made by Dr. King at the Convocation on Equal Justice Under Law, sponsored by the NAACP Legal Defense Fund on May 28, 1964.

Coretta Scott King's SCLC Contributors Card

This card reminds Mrs. King of her previous year's contribution and solicits her support for another year.

Crusade For The Ballot

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference issues a pamphlet addressing the need for increased registration of Negro voters in the southern states of America.

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