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African Americans - Civil rights.

Associated Archive Content : 330 results

Invitation from Hubb Coppens to MLK

Hubb Coppens invites Dr. King to make an appearance at West Berlin to address the Dutch students during his time in Europe. Mr. Coppens explains that it is the schools aim to educate their students on world issues.

Invitation from the United States Commission on Civil Rights

Dr. king is invited to participate in the National Conference on Race and Education by the United States Commission on Civil Rights.

Is Nonviolence Doomed To Fail?

Dr. King enumerates the accomplishments made in the fight for civil rights through nonviolent practices. Additionally, he utilizes this article in the Associated Negro Press to discredit the claim that nonviolence is losing shape in the United States.

Join the Ranks! Support A Worker

An SCLC field worker writes to gain support for the SCLC so that the organization can fulfill its mission to help blacks "achieve full citizenship rights, stimulate nonviolent mass action, and secure the right to vote."

Laymen's Retreat League

This letter from Thomas Gedeon serves as a response to a notion and tentative dates for a clergy retreat including Dr. King.

Letter from a Lithuanian American to MLK

In this letter to Dr. King, a Lithuanian immigrant to the United States writes that he agrees with the campaign for Negro rights and believes that all U.S. citizens should be treated equally.

Letter from A. J. de Witte to Roy Wilkins

A. J. de Witte writes Roy Wilkins condemning him for scolding Dr. King's outspoken dissatisfaction with the war in Vietnam. Witte explains the importance of civil rights leaders engaging in the discussion surrounding the war.

Letter from A.C. Spectorsky to MLK

Editorial Director, A.C. Spectorsky, requests comments from Dr. King regarding an interview with Senator Charles Percy from the April issue of PLAYBOY Magazine. The Illinois Republican
discusses a range of subjects including American military presence in Vietnam, President Lyndon B. Johnson's leadership style, and Negro-white relations.

Letter from A.J. de Witte to Roy Wilkins

A.J. de Witte conveys his dissatisfaction to Roy Wilkins over the NAACP's criticism of Dr. King's opposition to the Vietnam War. De Witte withdraws his financial support to the NAACP, instead contributing to Dr. King, Stokley Carmichael of SNCC and Floyd McKissick of CORE.

Letter from Abdul Razak Ahmad to MLK

Abdul Razak Ahmad requests a message of support from Dr. King for an upcoming event. Ahmad is the president of the University of Singapore's Socialist Club. This letter praises Dr. King for his leadership and also discusses racial problems in Singapore.

Letter from Alfred Gallen to MLK

A Chicago native writes to Dr. King concerning his current social and political affairs. He suggests that Dr. King should redirect his efforts to empower the black community rather than utilizing government assistance. He asserts that his presence and activities have ignited negative race relations.

Letter from Alfredo Gomez Gil to MLK

Sheila M. Rogers writes Dr. King in place of her friend Alfredo Gil, who has written a poem in Spanish about the plight of blacks. Rogers has translated the poem and sent it to Dr. King in support of the work he is doing for blacks in the United States.

Letter from Amos O. Holmes to MLK

Amos Holmes, Georgia Field Director of the NAACP, appeals to Dr. King to reject the invitation to take leadership within the Atlanta community. He feels that the city can solve its own problems without the aid of SCLC or Dr. King.

Letter from an Asylum Inmate to MLK Seeking Assistance

Paul Douglas Ware, an untried inmate, requests Dr. King's "understanding, moral support, and possible assistance." Mr. Ware informs Dr. King of detailed information regarding his unjust treatment, his personal life, his present state of mind and most importantly his desire to have a stronger bond with "his own people."

Letter From Andrew Young to Chris Folcker

In this letter, Andrew Young thanks Chris Folcker for his work with the Martin Luther King Fund, the Europe-wide fundraising campaign on behalf of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and Dr. King. Young praises the "tremendous success" of the fund.

Letter from Andrew Young to Harry Belafonte

Andrew J. Young writes Harry Belafonte applauding him on his television show "The Strolling Twenties." Unlike average shows, Belafonte delivers "high calibre performances" with the ability to articulate the realities of the American Negro. Young further expresses hope that the 1966 Freedom Festival in Chicago has a similar effect.

Letter From Andrew Young to Julian Bond

Mr. Young expresses his appreciation for Mr. Bond, a founding member of SNCC, social activist, and politician in the state of Georgia. He urges Mr. Bond to continue the fight for racial equality despite major adversities.

Letter from Baptist World Alliance to MLK

Baptist World Alliance Church expresses its gratitude to Dr. King for his visit to the Amsterdam Conference, and follows up with a reminder of his promise to consider an invitation from Scandinavia.

Letter from Barbara Hannagan to MLK

Barbara Hannagan, a student at Gridley Union High School in California, requests information from Dr. King to assist her with a term paper. She expresses her interest in the history of Negroes in America and how that correlates to the current issues of Negroes in "white society."

Letter from Ben Cashion to MLK

Ben Cashion writes Dr. King sharing some of his observations. Cashion suggests that Dr. King takes his time and get closer to God to provoke efficient change.

Letter From Bessie Burrett to MLK

Bessie Burrett, a NAACP member, writes Dr. King asking for help and explaining the multiple incidences of racial injustice she and her husband have personally witnessed. Burrett describes her husband's injuries, which he obtained as a result of police brutality, and their struggles with unfair treatment in the court system. As a result, her husband is unable to work and they have mounting hospital and court fees to pay, creating a financial hardship for their family.

Letter from Boyd Burns to MLK

Boyd Burns criticizes Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War, equating it to the statements he hears from his white friends regarding the civil rights movement.

Letter from Bruce Macdonald to MLK

Brice Macdonald, a writer for Canada's national newspaper "The Globe and Mail," informs Dr. King that he will be travelling to the South to see how it is developing. Macdonald inquires if he can converse with Dr. King or any of his employees who are well informed on the situation in Southern regions.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK

In reply to Dr. King's telegram concerning the actions of a Mitchell County peace officer towards Mrs. Slater King, the wife of a civil rights activist and successful real estate broker, Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall writes that an investigation of this matter has been ordered.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the US Department of Justice to MLK

Civil Rights Division Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall responds to a telegram from Dr. King requesting an investigation regarding conditions at the Mitchell County, Georgia Jail. Marshall points out that his department has no juridiction in the absence of any federal violations, but he assures the Reverend that he will examine any information sent by Dr. King.

Letter from Carol Thomas to MLK

Carol Thomas writes Dr. King to inform him that she is making a donation to help with the war on poverty. Enclosed with the letter is a $125.00 check. She also explains that she received one of King's books in the mail. Ms. Thomas further inquires of the purchasing and mailing information of books made to the public.

Letter from Charles Armstrong to Robert Ruper

Charles Armstrong, Publisher & Editor of the South Suburban News, writes to the Executive Vice President and CEO of Phillip Morris, Robert Ruper. In response to lack of funding provided to black communities, Dr. King, Jesse Jackson, and other leaders spark a nationwide boycott, Operation Breadbasket. Mr. Armstrong urges Mr. Ruper to comply with recent demands concerning acts discrimination within Phillip Morris.

Letter from Constance A. Price to Peter H. Dominick

Constance Price addresses grievances and complaints related to human rights. She demands appropriate and necessary congressional actions.

Letter from Debby Swichkow and Michael Goldberg to MLK

This is a letter from Debby Swichkow and Michael Goldberg to Dr. King inviting him to be the keynote speaker at a Jewish Seminar on Negro-Jewish relationships.

Letter from Donna Mitchell to MLK

Donna Mitchell, an African American youth from Detroit, writes Dr. King to extend her support and express her appreciation for what he and others are doing in Birmingham, Alabama.

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