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Vietnam War, 1961-1975

Associated Archive Content : 399 results

104:3 General Correspondence 1967 (T)

Richard Tennent Jr. requests that Dr. King consider applying his efforts of non-violence to Cleveland, Ohio "...to help prevent the violence that seems inevitable." Tennent states that he cannot support the Reverend's stance on the Vietnam War, either financially or intellectually.

1966 Notes on the War

Dr. King annotates a speech to address his concerns about the war in Vietnam and his duties as a civil rights leader.

1967 Geneva Convocation

Dr. King provides introductory remarks to participants of the Pacem In Terris II Convocation held in Geneva, Switzerland. He addresses several moral and political concerns as it relates war and Vietnam.

A Big Johnny Reb Special Editorial

The Big Johnny Reb Radio Show, a show syndicated throughout the State of Georgia, criticizes Dr. King for his position on the Vietnam War. The management of the radio station agrees with the view that too much American blood has been spilled, but they also state Dr. King should not denounce his own country's cause in the fight against Communism.

A Call to Vietnam Week

This article discusses the Call to Vietnam Week, scheduled to take place April 8 through the 15th. The goal of this event was to promote grass roots awareness of war's destruction.

A Journey of Conscience

In this draft of his 1967 speech, "A Journey of Conscience," Dr. King provides the many reasons he so strongly opposes the war in Vietnam. He writes of how he first felt it was important to remain silent, but gradually felt compelled to speak out, as the US made no initiatives toward peace. He points at that the war abroad takes away our focus on our problems at home, and we must "combine the fervor of the civil rights movement with the peace movement."

Address on Anti-Poverty by Jerome P. Cavanagh

Jerome P. Cavanagh, Mayor of Detroit, delivers this speech before the Office of Economic Opportunity Urban Areas Conference, Great Lakes Region. The conference is dedicated to sharing experiences in the War on Poverty and taking a realistic assessment on the issues in urban areas. Inadequate education, food, housing, and disjointed welfare systems are major problems of concern. Cavanagh encourages the analysis of programs addressing these situations. He also advocates an understanding of federal aid cutbacks and connects insufficient funds to the Vietnam War and space exploration.

American Clergymen's Committee for Vietnamese War Relief

The American Clergymen's Committee for Vietnamese War Relief requests that Dr. King join them in sending medical supplies to North Vietnam. They also explain the difficulties they are receiving from the government to obtain a Treasury Department License which would enable them to assist in the war relief. Lastly, the committee informs Dr. King of how other churches have made generous contributions to help with relief for the Vietnam War.

American Influence in Vietnam

Dr. John C. Bennett, President of the Union Theological Seminary, expresses his political beliefs concerning the presence of American military in Vietnam.

An Appeal by Puerto Ricans for Fair Treatment

This document reviews the economic, political, and cultural disparity of Puerto Ricans. The authors explain the history of American imperialism in Puerto Rico and how Puerto Ricans have been mistreated in the United States, particularly in New York. Criticizing the Vietnam War, the authors suggest focusing the funding used abroad on community building.

Anonymous Card and Article to MLK

An anonymous sender encloses an article written about Dr. King and his anti-Vietnam War sentiments.

Anonymous Criticism of MLK's Stance on Vietnam

This anonymous letter writer feels that Dr. King's active stance against the Vietnam war takes away from his fight for civil rights. He includes a newspaper article that encapsulates Dr. King's views on the subject, and lists the reasons he feels that Dr. King is being unpatriotic.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Dr. King received this letter from an individual who urges that both poverty and the Vietnam War should be ended by helping Americans and building up communities, and then sending peaceful volunteers to South Vietnam to do the same. The author, who has several family members in the service, chooses not to sign their name, fearing retribution, and states that they wish to broadcast this message around the world.

Antiwar Slogans

The Spring Mobilization Committee issues a list of official slogans for Vietnam War protest placards. Groups and individuals who intend to protest are asked to use these slogans on their self-made placards with the phrase "STOP THE WAR NOW" printed at the bottom.

Article Written by the Spring Mobilization Committee To End the War in Vietnam

The following article written by the Spring Mobilization Committee illustrates the growing international support for ending the Vietnam War. It specifically highlights the Union of Vietnamese Students in France, an organization seeking to cooperate with American students in order to promote peace in Vietnam.

Atlanta Workshop in Nonviolence Newsletter

This newsletter, Volume I Number 4, is published by Henry and Sue Bass of Atlanta. They write about the Atlanta Peace Parade, an anti-Vietnam protest to take place on August 6, 1967. The Atlanta Peace Parade would become the south's first major peace parade, about which the Basses write President Johnson was worried, calling for counter-demonstrations.

Background of the Speakers

This document lists speakers for rallies in New York and San Francisco and gives a short biography of each person. The speakers include people such as Dr. Benjamin Spock, Dr. King, Rev. James Bevel, Floyd McKissick, Julian Bond and others. The document also lists folk singers for each rally location, a list that includes Pete Seeger.

Black Americans Take the Lead in War Protest

In this press release, the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam has mustered a significant following of supporters who are in staunch opposition to United States involvement in Vietnam. Black community leaders such as Stokley Carmichael, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and Rev. James Bevel reflect the growing discontent of blacks who "view this war as a war against a colored people" merely serving the economic interests of America.

Black Power

This is a chapter sermon for Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here?" The civil rights leader traces the early development of Black Power and its eventual surge onto the national political scene. Though understood as a direct opposition to the nonviolent movement that organizations like SCLC, CORE, and SNCC originally supported, King describes Black Power as a "disappointment wrapped in despair."

Black Power and the American Christ

The Christian Century published this article by historian and civil rights activist Vincent Harding in its June 4, 1967 issue. In the essay, Harding, friend, associate, and speech writer for Dr. King, claims that Eurocentric Christianity antagonized the Black Power Movement.

Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church Concerns on Vietnam

The Board of Christian Social Concerns are troubled by the events transpiring in Vietnam. They believe that such violence cannot be God's will and offer their solutions on how to end the war. They also applaud Dr. King for his views and words concerning the war.

Bond and The Constitution

The author of this article argues that the Georgia State Legislature's refusal to seat Horace Julian Bond represents a great injustice. The author asserts that Mr. Bond was refused a seat due to his views on American foreign policy and the issue of race.

CEP News

The Citizenship Education Program of the SCLC, in cooperation with the American Missionary Association issue this periodic publication that includes updates of the organization's progress, current events and other news of interest.

Christianity and Crisis: April 3, 1967

Roger L. Shinn wrote this article for Christianity and Crisis: A Christian Journal of Opinion. Shinn defines a "conscientious objector" as one who believes a war morally unjustifiable, and chooses, therefore, not to serve in it. Several Christian organizations attempted to introduce legislation banning forced participation. The American Civil Liberties Union has encouraged the selective service system to recognize a policy "under which no person shall be compelled to participate in armed conflict when he believes it to be in violation of his conscience."

Civil Rights and Vietnam

An avid supporter urges Dr. King to divert his attention to the War in Vietnam. He asserts "This war will force Chinese and Russian to interfere and may further expand into thermonuclear war..."

Conference on Strengthening the New Politics

Paul Albert forwards this letter to all individuals invited to and interested in the Shoreham Conference, in which Liberals address the shortcomings of American politics.

Declaration of the World Council of Peace on Vietnam

The World Council of Peace issued this press release declaring their position against the Vietnam War. They state that they are pro-peace and against American oppression and that President Johnson is ignoring their peace proposals.

Detroit Free Press: Dr. King Strengthens an Anti-War Coalition

This article, which appeared in the 'As We See It' column of the Detroit Free Press, reports Dr. King's speech in New York from April 4, 1967 on his opposition to the Vietnam War.

Does MLK Have the Right? the Qualifications? the Duty? to Speak Out on Peace

SCLC National Executive Director Andrew Young addresses recent articles criticizing Dr. King's expressions on peace. Young argues that these attacks are largely based on misconceptions of Dr. King's views. He states that the media is quick to attack Dr. King, but whenever critics retract their statements, nothing is reported. To combat this, Young includes a sampling of accurate articles on Dr. King to "redress the imbalance."

Don B. Pratt's Position Statement

Don Pratt expresses concerns about his induction into the US Army during the Vietnam War. Mr. Pratt questions the morality of this "aggressive" war, which would enable him to inflict violence against his "neighbors" of Vietnam.

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