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Vietnam War, 1961-1975

Associated Archive Content : 399 results

Letter from Menno Klassen to MLK

Menno Klassen offers support on behalf of the Peace Committee of the Mennonite Central Committee for Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War. Klassen explains that Dr. King is facing the same opposition that Jesus Christ did because he is continuing Jesus' work.

Letter from Michael Hamilton to MLK

Rev. Michael Hamilton, Washington Cathedral Canon, thanks Dr. King for contributing a speech to be published in the book "The Vietnam War - Christian Perspectives." Rev. Hamilton informs Dr. King that proceeds from the book will be donated to the Swiss International Committee of the Red Cross. He also invites Dr. King to preach at the Cathedral and use the platform to discuss current Congressional legislation. Dr. King would eventually preach his last sermon at the Washington Cathedral on March 31, 1968, four days before his assassination.

Letter from Midsouth Management's Ardin Hartman to MLK

Ardin Hardin writes to Dr. King thanking him for the invitation to the SCLC's convention, but informs him that he will not attend because he does not agree with Dr. King's views on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Mike Epstein to MLK

Mr. Epstein thanks Dr. King for his leadership in the Civil Rights Movement and his stance on the war in Vietnam. Epstein considers Dr. King's status as "a man of judgment" an asset.

Letter from Minister C. Vernon Lake to MLK About a Vietnam Strategy

Minister C. Vernon Lake writes Dr. King with an enclosure containing a new strategy for vietnam. His plan is built on the shoulders of the World War II "Marshall Plan."

Letter from MLK to Donald Lincoln Cook

Dr. King thanks Mr. Cook for letter, in which Cook stated his support of Dr. King's stance against the United States military's involvement in Vietnam.

Letter from MLK to Former Supporters

Dr. King addresses former supporters concerning his controversial stance on Vietnam. He examines the country's colonial history and struggle for independence as contributing factors to America's current military presence in Vietnam. The civil rights leader defends his commitment to nonviolence as an "exceptional moral responsibility" that must transcend international borders.

Letter from MLK to Fredrik Schjander

Dr. King responds to a survey of five questions from Fredrik Schjander regarding the world's chances for peace. Dr. King believes the prospects for world peace have actually declined since he received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964, due to conflicts in areas such as Kashmir and Vietnam. Dr. King does write that the growing role of the United Nations as a global mediator is an encouraging sign.

Letter from MLK to Jacob Nolde

Dr. King discusses with Jacob Nolde the importance of nonviolent peace movements and the malady of the Vietnam War. He stresses that these nonviolent actions should be exercised internationally and America should cease its desire to maintain wide-spread military control.

Letter from MLK to Jonathan B. Bingham

Dr. King responds to Congressman Bingham's request for information concerning SCLC's position on foreign policy matters and donor contributions. Dr. King informs the congressman that the organization decided at a recent convention to "have SCLC abstain from foreign policy matters," in order to preserve its civil rights objectives and donor's trust. However, Dr. King states that SCLC permits individual employees to assume whatever position they choose regarding foreign policy matters, and contributes his public statements concerning Vietnam to this privilege.

Letter from MLK to Kjell Eide

In this letter, Dr. King apologizes to Mr. Eide for postponing his visit to Moscow. The Reverend postponed the trip due to the election of a Negro for mayor in Cleveland. Dr. King is hopeful that his visit can be rescheduled for mid-November.

Letter from MLK to Lenn Latham

Dr. King expresses gratitude for support of his work and advises that nonviolence is the only way to achieve change.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Theodore A. Dilday

Dr. King writes Mrs. Dilday of Riverside Baptist Church to express his appreciation for her two contributions to the SCLC. He explains the current works of the SCLC in Chicago and Alabama and stresses the importance of supporters like her.

Letter from MLK to Robert B. Shaw

Dr. King informs Mr. Robert B. Shaw that his commitment to the Civil Rights Movement and hectic schedule hindered him from attending the rally.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Albert Weiss to MLK

A Wisconsin couple criticizes Dr. King for "outcries" against policy in Vietnam and the "so called peace movement."

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Francis Smiley

Mr. Francis Smiley expresses his admiration to Dr. King for his leadership in what he describes as a potential end of civilization with the continued course of the Vietnam war. Francis encloses a check as an expression of heartfelt gratitude to the Reverend for his insight, humaneness, courage, and truthfulness.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Tullberg to MLK

The Tullberg family from New Hampshire conveys their support to Dr. King for his stance against the Vietnam War. They believe that the war is a violation of the basic principles of human rights.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Winfred P. Buckwalter III to MLK

Mr. and Mrs. Buckwater enclose a check for $500.00 that is intended to assist Dr. King in his efforts to stop the Vietnam conflict and help establish world peace.

Letter from Mrs. Berdeax to MLK

Mrs. Berdeax of Ohio informs Dr. King that she supports his position on the war in Vietnam and is ashamed of her country.

Letter from Mrs. Forest Dana to MLK

Mrs. Forest Dana writes Dr. King to express her displeasure in his outspoken stance against the Vietnam War. She acknowledges the withdrawal of her support and feels that he has done a disservice to Negroes in America. She believes he should focus on civil rights and not interfere with the war.

Letter from Mrs. G. Wayne

Mrs. G. Wayne, a white American mother, expresses support for Cassius Clay and everyone who denounces the Vietnam War.

Letter from Mrs. Lois Wheeler Snow to MLK

Ms. Snow writes to Dr. King extending support to the Reverend for his courageous condemnation of the Vietnam War. She makes a financial contribution, with regret for the inability to send more.

Letter from Mrs. R.B. Hassell to MLK

Writing from Memphis, Tennessee, Mrs. Hassell expresses her love for America and her concern regarding the cruel treatment many have experienced throughout the world. She offers encouragement to Dr. King and other preachers who are advocates for peace.

Letter from Mrs. Ruth Spencer to MLK

Mrs. Spencer shares her belief that "the Negro problem and the Vietnamese War are part of the same problem," though often concealed by news media propaganda. She expresses her gratitude towards Dr. King for his nonviolent philosophy and offers her financial support.

Letter from Mrs. Samuel Rosen to MLK

Mrs. Samuel Rosen writes Dr. King recollecting when she marched with him in Montgomery. Rosen states that she and her husband are proud of Dr. King and his works regarding the Vietnam War.

Letter from Mrs. Sigrid Sharp to MLK

Mrs. Sharp commends Dr. King for his open opposition to the Vietnam War. She further requests copies of his April 4, 1967 speech before New York's Riverside Church, in order to raise political awareness and garner support against the war effort.

Letter from Mrs. Zabelle Tourian to MLK

Zabelle Tourian expresses her support for Dr. King, relaying several short statements regarding famous African American persons of recent history.

Letter from Nancy Davison to MLK

Nancy Davison writes Dr. King to thank him for his words published in Ramparts. She writes that she finds it thrilling to be able read his own words instead of quotations used by others out of context. She thanks him for the stance he has taken on Vietnam, for fighting injustice, and for "having the courage to reveal what is in your heart."

Letter from Ned and Augusta Thomas to MLK

Ned and Augusta Thomas write Dr. King asking if SCLC is truly a "nonsectarian agency," then why is the word "Christian" a part of the name? They also state that they "strongly back" Dr. King's stand on Vietnam.

Letter from Nickolas W. Dick to MLK

Nickolas W. Dick writes Dr. King on behalf of Dr. Frank H. Epp extending an invitation to the Reverend to hold a series of meetings in Winnipeg. Dick closes by requesting confirmation of the extent of his stay.

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