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African Americans - Education.

Associated Archive Content : 319 results

"We're Here Because We're Tired"

Civil rights leader Andrew Young expresses the collective frustration of the African-American community concerning employment discrimination, housing segregation, and the welfare system.

A Brief Summary of Fifteen Years at Morehouse

This pamphlet is from Dr. King's undergraduate alma mater, Morehouse College. The President of the institute, Benjamin E. Mays, is the author of , "A Brief Summary of Fifteen Years at Morehouse" which outlines the progress made during his presidency.

A Look to 1964

This is a draft of the article "A Look to 1964" written by Dr. King. Published on January 1, 1964 in the New York Amsterdam News. In the article, Dr. King addresses the strides the African American people have taken towards the struggle for equality.

A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart

"A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart" by Dr. King discusses the importance of creating a synthesis of opposites and characteristics of one engaged in shrewd thinking with a loving spirit.

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Address by MLK at 47th NAACP Annual Convention

Dr. King addresses the audience at the 47th NAACP annual convention in San Francisco, California. King begins with background information of slavery and its physical and mental effects on Africans, then tells the "Montgomery Story." This story begins with a mental transformation among blacks, which led to the Montgomery boycott. As a result of the boycott, blacks were empowered and began fighting injustice and seeking changes in unfair legislation.

Address by MLK at SCLC Ministers Conference

Dr. King addresses those in attendance at the Southern Christian Ministers Conference. He brings words of encouragement to those working diligently for social change in Mississippi. He speaks words of promise that things will change since the Supreme Court has ruled segregation unconstitutional and he gives examples of how things are slowly changing. However, he acknowledges that there is still much work to be done, especially in the South. Dr. King lists actions that must be at the top of everyone's list to be taken care of.

Address to Members of the Hungry Club

Dr. King discusses the Negro's dilemma in an address to the members of the Hungry Club in Atlanta, Georgia. He argues that some of the challenges facing the Negro are: taking advantage of all the new federal programs, encouraging youth to go into higher education, and developing massive action programs to rid unjust systems. Dr. King also states three myths the Negro should explore: the myth of time, the myth of "exaggerated progress," and the myth of "total reliance on the boothstrap philosophy."

Albany Movement Position Paper

The Albany Movement expresses the damages of segregation and outlines their requests for peaceful integration.

America

Dr. King quotes a statement from American theologian Reinhold Niebuhr regarding the country's "historic situation in which the paradise of domestic security is suspended in a hell of global insecurity."

American Negro in the Field of Industrial Relations

This survey is an enclosure of a letter from Alfred L.J. Gunn to Dr. King. Entitled "The Negro in Personnel and Industrial Relations," the survey was conducted using interviews with American people involved in Industrial Relations. Through asking a series of questions to sixty participants, it is concluded that "the future of the American Negro in the field of Industrial Relations is expanding greatly."

Annual Report Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Operation Breadbasket, unemployment, poverty, nonviolence, Negro voter registration, and a financial report are just several of the topics covered in this informational pamphlet detailing the ways in which monies were divided amongst the many functions of the SCLC.

Article Written by MLK for The Progressive

In this unfinished draft of an article for The Progressive, Dr. King writes about the social ills of America through the context of what he calls the two most important documents in American history: the Declaration of Independence and the Emancipation Proclamation.

Bloody Sunday

Dr. King recollects events that occurred on "Bloody Sunday" in Selma, Alabama as 525 blacks marching were tear-gassed, clubbed, and beaten by police officers and discusses how television helped the Civil Rights Movement. King asserts that the television helps us all be participants in vital matters and it adds trust and validity to the movement.

Book Outline: Education and the Urban Poor

This book outline lists the chapters and contributing authors of the publication "Education and the Urban Poor." The authors represented include educational professionals from all over the country including Robert L. Green, Associate Professor at Michigan State University and Education Director for the SCLC. Dr. King is listed as the author of Chapter Two entitled "Education and the Negro Revolution."

Chicago Defender: My Dream

Dr. King writes this article for the Chicago Defender describing the social and economic climate of Chicago's ghettos. He explains that Ghettos are the site of economic exploitation and where no exchange of culture and resources are allowed to exist. SCLC staff and Reverend James Bevel "have come to see this as a system of internal colonialism." It is understood that slum culture is designed to perpetuate the inferior educational, health, housing, and employment states of the Negro.

Chicago Freedom Rally

This document reflects an informational flyer regarding the Chicago Freedom Rally which promotes integration.

Citizens Crusade Against Poverty Project Summary

Citizens Crusade Against Poverty summarizes a nationwide project focused on eradicating poverty, providing funding for education, and creating more effective ways to utilize welfare spending.

Citizenship Education Proposal

SCLC's Citizenship Education Program issues a five year proposal for the period between 1965 and 1970. The proposal outlines previous successful activities since the inception of the program.

City Council Kills Hopes for Low Rental Apartment Complex

This article, located in The Independent, covers a housing conflict in San Diego, California. The housing project would provide clean, modern apartments for the Negro population, using the extra land of Mt. Hope Cemetery. The goal of the project is to alleviate an area with over 4,000 substandard housing units. Approved by federal agencies, the project would also offer supplemented rent to those unable to afford the full amount. Despite approval, city council members rejected the idea due to opposition from white property owners and residents.

City of Philadelphia News Release - James H. J. Tate, Mayor

Members of the Cabinet of Mayor James H. J. Tate of the City of Philadelphia release a statement following the assassination of Dr. King. The Cabinet pledges to rededicate to the establishment of equality and justice, to eliminate poverty and intolerable housing condition, and to provide adequate educational systems and facilities, for all citizens.

Congress of Racial Equality Proposal: Recommended Program for School Desegregation

The Congress of Racial Equality recommends a program to end school segregation that includes forming race-neutral curricula and allowing open enrollment in schools.

CORE - Progress Report #1

Benjamin Brown details the structure of the latest publication from the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE). The CORE Guide to Negro History will be a composite of contributing essays, pictures, prized Negro literature and evaluations of social progress by current civil rights leaders. Beacon Press is listed as the potential publisher for the groundbreaking book.

Coretta Scott King's SCLC Contributors Card

This card reminds Mrs. King of her previous year's contribution and solicits her support for another year.

Coronet Magazine: After Desegregation-What

In this draft of an article for Coronet Magazine, Dr. King outlines the challenges that Negro college students will face after desegregation and the impact of the student movement as a whole. He argues that desegregation is not the same as integration, but that the former must happen in order for the latter to exist. Dr. King also explains that Negro students are gaining a much richer education by participating in sit-ins and other civil rights demonstrations, which will prepare them for society once desegregation is a reality.

Democratic National Convention Platform Committee Statement

In this statement delivered August 22, 1964, Dr. King outlines three urgent priorities for the Committee and the party as a whole: enforcement of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, furthering voting rights and the war on poverty. He asks that the platform include a recommendation that a panel of voting rights marshals be established and that the Convention support a Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged.

Desegregation and the Future

This document contains the first eight pages of Dr. King's address at the annual luncheon of the National Committee for Rural Schools at New York's Commodore Hotel in 1956. In it, he condemns segregation as an evil which has been allowed to exist in American life for too many decades. Dr. King points out that many states now stand in opposition to desegregation, and the federal government and the Supreme Court must now face how to make this new legislation a reality.

Dr. King Announces Appointment of Director of New SCLC Project to Train Urban Negro Leaders

In a press release, Dr. King announces Rev. T.Y. Rogers as the Director of the Negro ministerial training, a project created by the SCLC. The purpose of this program is to provide training seminars for ministers, which will ultimately assist congregational members with employment, economic development, voter registration, and education.

Draft Introduction for "Why We Can't Wait"

This document is a draft of the introduction for Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait." Dr. King uses various African American children stories to explain that one cannot afford to wait for justice.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. Hasselvander

Dr. King writes Mr. Hasselvander hoping to resolve some issues from recent events of injustice and inequality that occurred in Hasselvander's life.

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