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African Americans - Education.

Associated Archive Content : 319 results

Letter from MLK to J. S. Beckington

Dr. King thanks Mr. J. S. Beckington for his contribution to the SCLC. King also expresses how important the loyal supporters are to his organization.

Letter from MLK to Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Schiltz

Dr. King thanks Mr. and Mrs. Schiltz for their financial contribution to the SCLC. He explains the current efforts of the organization and the significance of their contribution.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Babcock

Dr. King expresses his most sincere gratitude for Mrs. Elizabeth T. Babcock's support of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from MLK to Nathaniel Barber

Dr. King thanks Nathaniel Barber for his contribution to the SCLC and gives a brief overview of the work done by the organization.

Letter from MLK to President Johnson on Greenville Air Base

Dr. King writes to President Johnson proposing the conversion of the Greenville Air Base to a center for training and housing for poverty-stricken Negro citizens of the Mississippi Delta. He urges that the program be coordinated by federal officials and representatives, that action be taken to provide decent housing and nondiscriminatory training programs, and that clear-cut procedures for evaluation be established.

Letter from MLK to R. B. Taylor

Dr. King thanks Dr. R. B. Taylor for his generous contribution to the SCLC. King discusses how the funds are allocated to assist with voter registration, education and finding jobs for blacks.

Letter from MLK to Rev. E. Wayne Roberts

Dr. King writes Rev. E. Wayne Roberts in support of his fellow friend and SCLC Co-Founder Rev. C. K. Steele, Jr. He notes Rev. Steele as "a thorough and competent pastor" that exemplifies the teachings of Jesus Christ.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Walter E. Fauntroy

Dr. King offers his gratitude to Rev. Walter E. Fauntroy of the New Bethel Baptist Church in Washington D.C. for a monetary contribution. Dr. King also explains how the money will help the SCLC work towards racial unity.

Letter from MLK to Richard C. Ernst

Dr. King writes Richard Ernst and thanks him for his generous contribution which "has tangibly resolved a part of the difficulty we face in the legal defense of Rev. Abernathy." Dr. King highlights some the programs the SCLC has been able to implement due to contributions, such as the Citizenship School Training Center and voter registration drives.

Letter from Morehouse College to MLK

The Morehouse Board of Trustees sends Dr. King a letter to accept the Committee's recommendation to elect Dr. Hugh Gloster as the next president of Morehouse College.

Letter from Morehouse College to MLK

Tobe Johnson asks Dr. King and other members of the Morehouse College Board of Trustees to fill out a questionnaire in preparation for re-accreditation by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.

Letter from Moreland Griffith Smith to MLK

Moreland Griffith Smith, Chairman of the Alabama Advisory Committee, invites Dr. King or a representative to an open meeting which will be held in Alabama. The purpose of the meeting is to gather information regarding equal protection under the law in areas such as housing, voting, and employment.

Letter from Mr. Herbert. H. Fisher to MLK

Mr. Fisher, President of the Chatham Avalon Park Community Council, provides an organized detailed account of community concerns. More specifically, he addresses various social and political issues regarding schools, housing, insufficient leadership, and government services.

Letter from Mrs. Carrie Fillmore to MLK

Mrs. Fillmore requests help from Dr. King as she informs him that she has six children and cannot afford to get them into schools. She also lets Dr. King know that she has gone to the NAACP without results.

Letter from Mrs. Eugene B. Stinson to Mr. Roy Wilkins

Mrs. Stinson of Pennsylvania writes Mr. Wilkins suggesting that all of the major civil rights organizations merge together to form one organization. She believes this will create a unified front in the fight for racial equality. In addition, Mrs. Stinson provides a list of suggestions this new organization could implement to facilitate change.

Letter from Mrs. Forest Dana to MLK

Mrs. Forest Dana writes Dr. King to express her displeasure in his outspoken stance against the Vietnam War. She acknowledges the withdrawal of her support and feels that he has done a disservice to Negroes in America. She believes he should focus on civil rights and not interfere with the war.

Letter from Mrs. M. Happe to MLK

Mrs. M. Happe, a poor white woman, expresses gratitude to Dr. King for his campaign to clean up the slums in Chicago. She asserts that poverty is an issue, but education is the main problem and individuals cannot display appropriate behavior that they have never experienced.

Letter from Mrs. W. Brown to MLK

Mrs. W. Brown proclaims that Dr. King should preach a colorblind love that is absent of hate and resentment toward white people. She further asserts that the contributions Dr. King received could have been used to improve substandard housing. Mrs. Brown continues to discuss her perception of the inadequacies within the black community in comparison to white people.

Letter from Mrs. Zabelle Tourian to MLK

Zabelle Tourian expresses her support for Dr. King, relaying several short statements regarding famous African American persons of recent history.

Letter from Neale J. Pearson to MLK

A Ph.D. candidate from the University of Florida writes Dr. King to tell him about the political and social progress made by the university's Americans for Democratic Action (ADA) chapter. The writer tells Dr. King that the Chapter has invited various political figures to speak at an upcoming lecture series. He extends the invitation to Dr. King and Dr. Charles Anderson, while simultaneously seeking Dr. King's help in contacting Dr. Anderson. The student informs Dr.

Letter from Nigerian Man to MLK

An affectionate admirer writes Dr. King to express his plans to take up studies in aeromechanics at a vocational school in the United States. The Nigerian native requests sponsorship from the Reverend and his organization to assist in this attempt.

Letter from Richard Boone Regarding Child Development Program in Mississippi

Richard Boone, Executive Director of Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty, encloses a news release regarding the upcoming opening of the Child Development Group of Mississippi.

Letter from Richard C. Gilman to MLK

Richard C. Gilman, President of Occidental College, invites Dr. King to speak to the students at their opening convocation.

Letter from Robert L. Green to MLK

Robert Green requests for Dr. King to write an introduction to the book, "Education and the Urban Poor."

Letter from Rosamond Reynolds to MLK

Rosamond C. Reynolds informs Dr. King that the Fifth General Assembly of the Unitarian Universalist Association adopted a comprehensive Statement of Consensus on Racial Justice. The statement reflects "the preponderance of opinion of the denomination, its members, and its churches, on the problems of segregation, discrimination, racial violence, education, housing..."

Letter from Ruth E. Foster to MLK

Mrs. Foster writes Dr. King expressing doubt in his nonviolent methods. She feels his nonviolent marches are an ineffective way to gain equality for Negroes.

Letter from Ruthe T. Sheffey to MLK

In this letter, Ms. Sheffey asks Dr. King's permission to use his "I Have a Dream" speech in her upcoming textbook, "Impressions in Asphalt." Ms. Sheffey is a faculty member at Morgan State College, who is working on a textbook of poetry and prose with coworker, Eugenia Collier.

Letter from S. Scott to MLK

S. Scott states how he objects to Dr. King's leadership because he believes that Dr. King's influence has resulted in lawless riots. Mr. Scott suggests alternatives for those who live in the "slums" and identifies education as a means of advancement. Furthermore, Mr. Scott assures results from the Civil Rights Bill in time.

Letter from Sargent Shriver to MLK

In this letter, Sargent Shriver discusses the success of the Upward Bound program at Morehouse College. Upward Bound is a program as part of the national war against poverty.

Letter from SCLC to Lizzie Williams

A representative of the Citizenship Education Program, an initiative of the SCLC, informs Mrs. Willis of recent travel plans to Dorchester, GA. Dorchester academy played a vital role in the struggle for voting and civil rights.

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