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African Americans - Education.

Associated Archive Content : 319 results

Letter from Sixth Grader to MLK

Kathy Brewster, an African American sixth grade student from Lincoln School in California, writes Dr. King expressing gratitude towards Dr. King for helping the Negro race.

Letter from SNCC's Judy Richardson to Coretta Scott King

Judy Richardson of SNCC writes to Mrs. King to give her a copy of the new Negro history primer, "Negroes in American History." The book serves as a method of teaching children about African American history while tying in elements of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Troy J. Horton to MLK

Troy J. Horton, a teacher at Wilson High School, inquires if Dr. King is interested in speaking to the student body of the school on topics such as racism, prejudice and segregation.

Letter from W. J. Murphy to Deton Brooks

Congressman W. J. Murphy writes this letter to Dr. Deton Brooks, Executive Director of the Commission on Urban Opportunity. After listening to a radio show, of which Dr. Brooks and Dr. King posed commentary, Murphy was prompted with a response towards solving America's racial issues. Murphy states he initially opposed the executively ordered Fair Employment Practices Commission for the reason that brotherly love could not be legislated. FEPC requires that companies in governmental contract could not discriminate on the basis of race or religion.

Letter from Wallace Terry to MLK

The Washington Post anticipates Dr. King's presence as their speaker for the Public Lecture Series "One Hundred Years of Freedom." However, the coordinator of the event, Wallace Terry, understands that Dr. King's imprisonment in the Birmingham jail might prevent Dr. King from appearing. Terry suggests that the Reverends Fred Shuttlesworth, Ralph Abernathy or Wyatt Walker could serve as a substitute. Lastly, Terry pledges to collect an offering for the SCLC.

Letter from Walter Ducey of the Illinois Fair Employment Practices Commission to MLK

In an effort to reduce the number of school dropouts, Walter Ducey of the Illinois Fair Employment Practices Commission requests to include Dr. King in their upcoming brochure. Ducey asks to include Dr. King's photograph and a quotation from a speech he delivered at Chicago's Soldier Field which highlighted academic achievement as a necessity.

Letter from Walter Jackson to MLK

Walter Jackson of Lincoln School in Berkley, California writes Dr. King extending his gratitude for the Reverend's efforts in Civil Rights.

Letter From Walter R. McCall to MLK

Morehouse School of Religion Director Walter McCall asks Dr. King for a contribution to purchase a piano that will be presented to Morehouse School of Religion.

Letter from Wendell K. Jones to MLK and Leon M. Sullivan

This is a letter of support to Dr. King from Wendell K. Jones for his tireless work on behalf of African Americans. Mr. Jones also recognizes Rev. Leon M. Sullivan for helping African Americans in Massachusetts.

Letter from Wendell P. Whalum to Fellow Morehouse Alumnus

Wendell P. Whalum informs the alumni of Morehouse College about the events that will place during inaugural week.

Letter from William H. Gray, Jr. to Congressman James A. Byrne

Prominent offical and businessman William H. Gray, Jr. writes United States Congressman James Byrne in regards to discrimination issues related to Negro students and the Selective Service System. Gray communicates with Congressman Byrne to intervene in a discriminatory matter involving a young Philadelphia native. Dr. King is forwarded a copy of this correspondence.

Letter from William H. Shell to MLK

William H. Shell is preparing an address for a high school graduation and is in need of various documents surrounding Dr. King's organization. Mr. Shell desires to know the detailed goals of the Civil Rights Movement, civil rights techniques, and the education demographics for the early 1960's.

Letter from William Mahoney to MLK

William Mahoney asks Dr. King for his input on a SCLC monthly publication in which he is attempting to create. The publication would seek to educate the public on social, economic, and political problems African Americans endure.

Letter from William R. Rice to MLK

William Rice, editorial director for WLS radio in Chicago, offers Dr. King suggestions for Operation Dropout. Also enclosed in the letter is a statement on the reasons to stay in school.

Letter from Woodrow T. Hughes to MLK

This letter from Woodrow Hughes and Norman Seay of the Kinloch Gateway Center invites Dr. King to speak at their Second Annual City Wide Workshop. The letter refers to an enclosure with basic information about the city of Kinloch, Missouri. Kinloch is one of the largest all-black cities in the United States

Letter of Recommendation for Sally Cantor

Mrs. W. M. Taylor, an English teacher at Grady High School, writes a letter of recommendation on behalf of Sally Cantor, a Russell H. Bull Scholarship applicant.

Letter to Rev. Malcolm Calhoun to MLK

Dr. King appreciates Rev. Calhoun's concern for the SCLC and the mission the organization has for the creating equality. Dr. King then explains how other programs offer contributions to the SCLC so that they may continue to engage in education, voter registration, economic development, and training of ministers for urban ministries.

Letter to Senator Abraham Ribicoff from Earl Whitted Jr.

In this reply to Sen. Ribicoff, Earl Whitted endorses the idea of a guaranteed fixed annual income for the poor, under certain stipulations. It is proposed that a Federal Housing Project area would also provide various economic services to the underprivileged. This program would accomplish education and self-sustainability for those that have been politically and economically disadvantaged.

Letters To Mrs. Fillmore from MLK

Dr. King responds to Mrs. Fillmore's previous letter, offering some suggestions to help her. He apologizes that he cannot use SCLC funds because that money is currently in use for the civil rights struggle. Dr. King suggests alternative organizations and programs that may offer her assistance.

Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March

Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, and Floyd McKissick sign the Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March, which represents a "public indictment and protest of the failure of American society." In solidarity, they demand courses of actions to deal with voting fraud, strengthened civil rights legislation, and impartial application of the law.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Pamphlet

This pamphlet promotes the historic March on Washington of August 28, 1963. The pamphlet calls upon Congress to pass civil rights legislation and end the "twin evils of discrimination and economic deprivation" that plague the nation.

March to Washington Strategic Planning

This document outlines key strategies concerning the upcoming March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom on August 28, 1963. The one-day civil rights demonstration intends to bring national attention to the social and economic injustices afflicting millions of American citizens.

Mass Mailing from the Model Inner city Community Organization

This is a form letter from the Reverend Walter E. Fauntroy informing the Shaw neighborhood of Washington, D.C. about Dr. King's visit to help revitalize the area.

Memorandum from Dr. King

Dr. King addresses this memorandum to the organizers of a "Stall In" at the World's Fair. He advises against the demonstration and only advises it when "persistent attempts at good faith negotiations have completely failed."

Memorandum from John Gunther to Urban Coalition Steering Committee

John Gunther submits a report to the members of the Steering Committee of the Urban Coalition stating that the Urban Coalition should be concerned with issues related to education, employment and housing. The memorandum outlines the job of the Council of Local Coalitions and states that the Steering Committee may add to the Coalition's numbers at any time. Lastly, Gunther informs the members of the staffing polices explaining how staffing will be planned on a yearly basis.

Memorandum from MLK and the World's Fair

This is a draft for Dr. King's correspondence regarding the endorsement of the "Stall In" at The World's Fair. The mass demonstration is lead by the Unity Council, of which Dr. King is associated with. Though he does not agree with the demonstration, he assures that his solidarity with the Council members remains.

Memorandum from Ralph D. Abernathy to SCLC Board Members and Executive Staff

Rev. Ralph Abernathy informs the board members and executive staff of SCLC that Dr. King is taking a leave of absence for two months to write his book, "Where Do We Go From Here?" During Dr. King's absence, Rev. Abernathy took over the activities of the SCLC.

Message from James Farmer About March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

James Farmer issues a message from the Donaldsonville Jail regarding the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. He regrets that he is unable to attend the event, but he supports the goals of the March.

Mississippi College Gets Poverty Role

The Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO) moves to remove the Child Development Group of Mississippi (CDGM) as the sponsor of pre-school antipoverty programs in the state. Sargent Shriver announces that Rust College will receive funding to administer the Head Start program in Marshall and Lafayette Counties of Mississippi. CDGM was one of the most important Head Start initiatives in the country, providing early childhood education, nutritional services, health care and other services to thousands.

Mississippi Project

The Mississippi Project is developed by SNCC which rooted from the evident white supremacy in this state. The organization sought to take action to eradicate the societal restrictions of the American Negro. The summer project will involve voter registration, freedom schools, community centers, and many more sectional projects.

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