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African Americans - Intimidation of

Associated Archive Content : 166 results

The Social Organization of Nonviolence

Dr. King breaks down the structure of a nonviolent movement. He describes at length the difference between "token" integration and true integration. He describes three types of violence that could be used to achieve integration to which he prefers the "wholesome," nonviolent choice. Lastly, Dr. King gives his opinion on the "evils" of war.

The State of Alabama - Equal Administration of Justice

This document addresses issues of discrimination in the South, particularly in Alabama, by state and federal institutions since the Republican Compromise of 1877. The document outlines a response to the many forms of discrimination occurring.

The Story of Snick

"From Freedom High to Black Power," by Gene Roberts, describes the opposing views voiced by SNCC and Dr. King regarding the civil rights movement. SNCC asserts a message of violence and black power, while Dr. King promotes a philosophy of love and nonviolence.

The Stresses of the White Female Worker in the Civil Rights Movement in the South

Dr. Alvin F. Poussaint describes social and psychological stresses that white female civil rights workers encounter in both their living and working conditions in the American South in the 1960's.

The Sword That Heals

Dr. King, in this article adapted from his book "Why We Can't Wait," evaluates the intimidation the Negro faces as a result of securing freedom. He uses the campaigns in Birmingham, Albany, and Montgomery as backdrops to depict how the use of nonviolent direct action causes unrelenting sacrifice in the face of grave danger. This article was published in this quarterly summer 1964 issue of "The Critic."

The Witness: MLK Writes from Birmingham Jail

"The Witness" publishes the second part of Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham City Jail." In this pivotal document, Dr. King expresses dissatisfaction with the white moderate and the white church regarding their silent stance on segregation and discrimination. He urges individuals to understand the delays, broken promises, and intimidation Negroes face to secure their freedom.

This is SCLC

This SCLC brochure highlights the organization's mission, organizational structure, and initiatives, such as voter registration drives, Citizenship Schools, and the Leadership Training Program.

U.S. News & World Report: Negro Leaders Tell Their Plans for '64

Past, present and future efforts in the area of civil rights are discussed in interviews of five organizational leaders in the civil rights movement. These leaders are: Whitney M. Young, Jr. of the National Urban League, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. of the SCLC, Roy Wilkins of the NAACP, James L. Farmer of CORE, and James Forman of SNCC.

Unitarian Universalist Statement of Consensus on Racial Injustice

The Fifth General Assembly of the Unitarian Universalist Association listed several laws adopted by the association. Some of the laws incorporate civil rights, demonstrations, voting rights, equality, civil disobedience, and discrimination in employment and housing.

Walk for Freedom

In this article, Dr. King address the issue of racism occurring in Montgomery. It was here that African Americans, including Dr. King, were victims to humiliation and violent acts because of their race. Dr. King further promote nonviolent protest to combat this civil injustice.

Wave of Violence Against Blacks

This pamphlet produced by the NAACP, New York Branch, begins with the discussion of a controversial statement made by Senator James Eastland and its adverse affect of increased violence among blacks. Eastland attacked the Supreme Court's desegregation edict by stating, "You are not required to obey any court which passes out such a ruling. In fact, you are obligated to defy it." Newspaper clippings are shown with headlines that illustrate the violence, murder, bombings, and attacks blacks faced.

We are Still Walking

Dr. King describes how African Americans reacted to the Klan's plan to intimidate them after the decision of the Supreme Court. Although deeply involved in the bus protest, Dr. King stated that there were other goals to achieve such as establishing a bank and credit union in Montgomery for African Americans.

When Peace Becomes Obnoxious

This 1956 newspaper column is a re-print of a sermon delivered by Dr. King on segregation and events in Alabama.

White House Message on Civil Rights

President Johnson's message to Congress explains strides the U.S. has made in the social, educational and economic conditions of minorities in America. It also discusses areas that need improvement such as infant mortality rates and poverty levels among non-whites. The President calls for legislation to prevent violence against those exercising their civil rights, to strengthen enforcement powers of the Equal Employment Opportunities Commission, to prevent discrimination on federal and state juries, and to guarantee fair housing.

Who Are We?

In this sermon Dr. King contemplates "who are we?" and "what is man?". He differentiates between the pessimistic attitudes of the materialistic understandings of man and the optimistic attitudes of humanistic definitions of man. King also states that man is neither all good nor all bad, but a combination. Man is both an everlasting miracle and mystery.

Wipe Out Police Brutality

This news bulletin created by the Nashville chapter of NAACP and the Davidson County Tennessee Independent Political Council implores African Americans to take action against police brutality and racial discrimination. To illustrate the point, the bulletin contains several pictures capturing police actions against student demonstrators. The article encourages the community's 30,000 unregistered Negro voters to "join the fight for freedom" by registering to vote, writing their Congressmen, and making their voices heard.

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