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African Americans - Relations with Jews.

Associated Archive Content : 47 results

Address by MLK at SCLC Ministers Conference

Dr. King addresses those in attendance at the Southern Christian Ministers Conference. He brings words of encouragement to those working diligently for social change in Mississippi. He speaks words of promise that things will change since the Supreme Court has ruled segregation unconstitutional and he gives examples of how things are slowly changing. However, he acknowledges that there is still much work to be done, especially in the South. Dr. King lists actions that must be at the top of everyone's list to be taken care of.

Address by Rabbi Joachim Prinz

Rabbi Joachim Prinz's address at the March on Washington focuses on the importance of freedom. He relates the struggle that blacks are currently enduring to the Nazism Jews faced during the reign of Hitler.

Anti-Semitism, Israel and SCLC:- A Statement on Press Distortions

This is a document that addresses the impression that the press created reporting that the SCLC was part of a group that condemned Israel and endorsed the policies of the Arab powers. This document also includes the annual report of the president by Dr. King.

Huge Crowd Hears King Speak

The University of Pittsburgh's campus newspaper, "The Pitt News," reports that Dr. King's speech drew a larger crowd than "John Kennedy, Theodore Sorenson or Herbert Aptheker when these men spoke at the University." Dr. King answers questions about issues such as Vietnam, Black Power, white backlash and Negro anti-Semitism. He also discussed the importance of an anti-poverty effort, particularly when examining what is spent on the war in Vietnam and the nation's space program.

If I were a Negro

Rabbi I. Usher Kirshblum writes Dr. King to share an article he wrote in the "Jewish Center of Kew Garden Hills Bulletin." The article references the expelling of Congressman Adam Clayton Powell and criticizes the African American response towards his defense. The author states, "If I were a Negro I would not waste my time in defending Powell's wrong acts but would rather speak of the many good acts he performed." Rabbi Kirshblum goes on to praise the views of men like Dr. King and Rev. Roy Wilkins, while rejecting those of Stokely Carmichael.

Join the Ranks! Support A Worker

An SCLC field worker writes to gain support for the SCLC so that the organization can fulfill its mission to help blacks "achieve full citizenship rights, stimulate nonviolent mass action, and secure the right to vote."

Let's Be Human

Long time civil rights agitator Harry Fleischman wrote this syndicated column for the American Jewish Committee's National Labor Service. Articles within the column took a humorous and often irreverent view of social and civil rights issues around the globe. Fleischman was also the national secretary of the Socialist Party USA from 1942-50.

Letter from Anna Cohen to MLK

Anna Cohen inquires to Dr. King about the involvement of the Jewish community in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Burton Cain to MLK

Burton Caine informs Dr. King of the dilemma with the American Jewish liberal's continuation in the Civil Rights Movement. Caine recounts repeated instances of Negroes singling out Jews in verbal attacks. He emphasizes this irony given that Jews have been active supporters of the Civil Rights Movement. Unsure if Dr. King stands in solidarity with anti-Semitic views, Caine asks Dr. King to issue a statement to clarify his beliefs.

Letter from Clarence H. Haines to MLK

Clarence Haines encloses a donation and comments on economic power. Haines suggests a verbal network between Negros so they can learn which stores are integrated and friendly in order to support those business owners.

Letter from David Ben-Gurion to MLK

Mr. Ben-Gurion, founder and first prime minister of Israel, congratulates Dr. King on his decision to lead a mass pilgrimage to Israel and Jordan. He also informs King that he is planning a trip to the US and looks forward to the opportunity of meeting in person. The pilgrimage, scheduled for November 1967, did not take place because of the Six Day Arab-Israeli War that June.

Letter from Debby Swichkow and Michael Goldberg to MLK

This is a letter from Debby Swichkow and Michael Goldberg to Dr. King inviting him to be the keynote speaker at a Jewish Seminar on Negro-Jewish relationships.

Letter from Dr. Eliot Stadler to MLK

Dr. Stadler writes Dr. King regarding his inability to join him in his campaign for the "rights of man." He expresses his regret with an enclosure of a financial contribution.

Letter from Emma Lazarus Federation of Jewish Women's Clubs to SCLC

June Gordon, Executive Director of Emma Lazarus Federation of Jewish Women's Clubs, encloses a check in the amount of $100. She also encloses material listing activities her organization has initiated.

Letter from Frazer Earle to MLK

Frazer Earle from the Canadian Council of Christian and Jews Inc. invites Dr. King to their Annual Banquet.

Letter from Israel Goldstein to MLK

Israel Goldstein congratulates Dr. King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize and extends an invitation to the King family to visit his home in Jerusalem.

Letter from Ivor Liss to MLK

Ivor M. Liss writes Dr. King and explains his support for the movement that Dr. King is leading. He talks about how being silent would actually hurt Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement. Liss explains that as a Jew he understands the fight for equality as it is something that Jewish people are still fighting for. He encloses a check for $100.00.

Letter from Jack Hopkins to Senator Morse

In a letter to Senator Wayne L. Morse, Jack Hopkins addresses his personal issues with the United States. He begins with a discussion of the conflict in Vietnam, and believes the United States is handling it poorly. He then expresses his feelings on the Jewish race and the establishment of a Jewish nation. He concludes his letter saying that the United States never tries to solve problems; rather it creates the foundation for a new war.

Letter from June Gordon to MLK

June Gordon, as the Executive Director of the Emma Lazarus Federation of Jewish Women's Clubs, issues a check to SCLC. They also pledge to assist other civil rights groups involved in the struggle for equality.

Letter from MLK to Adolph Held

Dr. King writes Adolph Held, President of the Jewish Labor Committee, in response to his inquiry regarding SCLC's position on anti-semitism. Dr. King clarifies a number of distortions produced by the media, and presents the facts of the Chicago Conference of New Politics event throughout the letter.

Letter from MLK to Charles H. Dorr

Dr. King writes Charles Dorr acknowledging his support of the young African American men who are boycotting the Olympic games. King states, "the country must concern itself with the plight of all Negroes and not just the privileged few."

Letter from MLK to Dr. Eisendrath

In this letter, Dr. King writes to Dr. Eisendrath to clarify SCLC's view on anti-Semitism. Dr. King explains that neither he nor his organization support any resolution calling for black separatism or the condemnation of Israel. He identifies oil as the primary issue in the region and maintains the only way to relieve the tensions between the Middle East and the United States is through peaceful solutions.

Letter from MLK to Rabbi Julius Rosenthal

Dr. King writes to his supporter Rabbi Julius Rosenthal responding to concerns raised about Dr. King's connections with Congressman Adam Clayton Powell (a prominent pastor and politician). Congressman Powell was a controversial figure during that time and while Dr. King did not share all of his views, he gave him credit for advocating Civil Rights for African Americans.

Letter from MLK to Rabbi Philip Hiat

Dr. King responds to Rabbi Hiat's suggestion to provide an "opportunity for dialogue between Jewish and Negro religious leadership." In addition to confirming his participation in the dialogue, Dr. King commits to sending an additional letter with the names of "men who have much to contribute" along with some potential subject headings for the agenda.

Letter from Rabbi Israel Miller to MLK

On the eighteenth anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Rabbi Israel Miller, Chairman of the American Jewish Conference on Soviet Jewry, invites Dr. King to speak over a national telephone hook-up.

Letter from Rabbi Joel S. Goor to MLK

Rabbi Joel Goor extends his appreciation to Dr. King for being able to participate in SCLC's 1964 desegregation campaign in St. Augustine, Florida. He feels that his involvement in the civil rights movement spirtitually enhances his role as an active religious leader. Rabbi Goor encloses a donation to the SCLC for assisting with his bail while being jailed in St. Augustine and a copy of "Why We Can't Wait" for Dr. King to autograph.

Letter from Rabbi Maurice Eisendrath to MLK

Rabbi Maurice Eisendrath, President of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations, thanks Dr. King for speaking out not only against the Vietnam War, but also in support of helping the poor. Rabbi Eisendrath tells Dr. King that he has"ignited the conscience of America, as no other man, on the struggle for racial justice."

Letter from Rabbi Philip Hiat to MLK

Rabbi Philip Hiat, Executive Vice-President of the Synagogue Council of America, invites Dr. King to meet with Jewish religious leaders.

Letter from Rabbi William Herskowitz to MLK

Rabbi William Herskowitz, editor of The Jewish Horizon, asks Dr. King to read and write a review on the book, "Negro and Jew."

Letter from Sandy F. Ray Regarding "Holy Land Pilgrimage"

Sandy F. Ray, president of Concreta Tours writes a letter sharing the details concerning Dr. King's Holy Land Pilgrimage. She explains that an office representative recently returned from the Middle East "with first hand information regarding tour conditions there." This document includes a report on hotels, roads, inhabitants, and basic information permitting travel to Israel and the West Bank of Jordan.

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