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Riverside Church (New York, NY)

Associated Archive Content : 36 results

A Knock At Midnight

In a tape-recorded address to the Riverside Church in New York City, Dr. King compares the civil rights struggle to a parable from St. Luke. His sermon specifically tackles contemporary social issues such as segregation, discrimination, and the philosophy of nonviolence. In addition, Dr. King explores the role of the church in dealing with such problems.

Catholics Involved in Integration

Members of Catholics Involved in Integration write a letter to solicit membership to their organization. The cost to join the group is one dollar per month. The funds raised are donated to Dr. King in support of his efforts to gain peace, freedom, and equality.

Detroit Free Press: Dr. King Strengthens an Anti-War Coalition

This article, which appeared in the 'As We See It' column of the Detroit Free Press, reports Dr. King's speech in New York from April 4, 1967 on his opposition to the Vietnam War.

Letter from Ann & John Flynn

In this letter, Ann Flynn requests a copy of the text of Dr. King's speech made at Riverside Church.

Letter from Ann Thompson to MLK

Ann Thompson, a white woman, writes Dr. King expressing support and thanks for his recent speech on peace. Thompson states that Dr. King is one of the few great men living.

Letter from Bella McGregor to MLK

Bella T. McGregor asks Dr. King for a copy of his sermon titled "St. Paul's Letter to American Christians."

Letter from Ben A. Todd to MLK

Ben A. Todd commends Dr. King for his recent stand against the United States' position in Vietnam, particularly because making such a statement may hurt the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from David Mocine to MLK

David Mocine writes on the economic disparity in the United States regarding African Americans in relation to their percentage of the population.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. H. Libby

Dora McDonald sends Mrs. Libby a copy of Dr. King's sermon "Paul's Letter to American Christians." McDonald could not retrieve a copy of the address preached at the Riverside Church that Mrs. Libby requested.

Letter from Ezra J. Evans to MLK

Mrs. Evans writes to Dr. King, suggesting to the expansion of educational conferences on the Vietnam War for the purpose of peace keeping and service.

Letter from Gregory Bergman to MLK

Mr. Bergman asks if he could receive a copy of Dr. King's speech given at Riverside Church. He regarded the speech as "one of the great speeches of our time."

Letter from Jack Krieger to MLK

Jack Krieger requests a reprint of Dr. King's speech delivered at the Riverdale Church in New York on the topics of peace and the Vietnam War.

Letter from James A. Farmer to MLK

Mr. Farmer thanks Dr. King on behalf of the Riverside Church for being their guest speaker. He tells Dr. King of the positive reaction that he received on his sermon.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK encluding copy of British magazine SLANT

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that she has enclosed a copy of the British magazine SLANT that has a shortened version of his Riverside Church address inside.

Letter from John A. Bodkin to MLK

John Bodkin writes Dr. King regarding the speech Dr. King delivered at Riverside Baptist Church in New York detailing his views on the war in Vietnam.

Letter from John Lazenby to MLK

John Lazenby, Professor Emeritus at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, encloses a donation to Dr. King. He further stresses that nonviolence is the prime method to solve problems around the world. Lazenby requests copies of Dr. King's anti-war speech delivered at New York's Riverside Church on April 4, 1967 to distribute to his friends.

Letter from John Maguire to Dora McDonald

Mr. Maguire writes Ms. McDonald requesting a full text copy of Dr. King's speech on "Viet Nam" in New York.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. D.A. McGregor

Dr. King expresses delight in Mrs. D.A. McGregor's request for a copy of his sermon "Paul's Letter to American Christians." However, since he doesn't have a complete manuscript of the sermon at the time he receives the letter, Dr. King mentions that it will be published in his upcoming book of sermons. The book of sermons would eventually be named "Strength to Love."

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Theodore A. Dilday

Dr. King writes Mrs. Dilday of Riverside Baptist Church to express his appreciation for her two contributions to the SCLC. He explains the current works of the SCLC in Chicago and Alabama and stresses the importance of supporters like her.

Letter from MLK to Robert J. McCracken

Dr. King declines to preach twice on one Sunday at Riverside Church in New York City. Besides time constraints, he needs to conserve his strength as per his doctor's recommendation. Because the 1964 World's Fair will be in New York at that time, they expect big crowds, requiring two services.

Letter from Mr. Peter Feldman to MLK

In this letter Peter Feldman, the production manager for WRVR Radio in New York City, requests an interview with Dr. King the day of his sermon at Riverside Church. WRVR feels the interview would be a "significant platform" for his upcoming march on Washington. Dr. King would be assassinated less than a month later.

Letter from Mrs. Ruth Spencer to MLK

Mrs. Spencer shares her belief that "the Negro problem and the Vietnamese War are part of the same problem," though often concealed by news media propaganda. She expresses her gratitude towards Dr. King for his nonviolent philosophy and offers her financial support.

Letter from Mrs. Sigrid Sharp to MLK

Mrs. Sharp commends Dr. King for his open opposition to the Vietnam War. She further requests copies of his April 4, 1967 speech before New York's Riverside Church, in order to raise political awareness and garner support against the war effort.

Letter From Paul H. Boase

Paul H. Boase writes Dr. King concerning a sermon, recording and publication that he would like to use to demonstrate that the Social Gospel is still alive.

Letter from Robert Bondy to MLK

Though a long time supporter of Dr. King, Robert Bondy, criticizes for Dr. King for mixing the issues of civil rights and Vietnam. He argues that speaking out against Vietnam has only further inflamed opponents of the Civil Rights Movement, and Dr. King has thrown back the movment "for a long time to come."

Letter from Robert J. McCracken to MLK

Rev. McCracken, of Riverside Church in New York, informs Dr. King that he is scheduled to speak at two identical church services. The Church has added the second service because the New York World?s Fair will be open.

Letter from Robert J. McCraken to MLK

Reverend McCracken extends an invitation to Dr. King to preach at The Riverside Church in New York.

Letter from Theodore R. Britton Jr. to MLK

Theodore R. Britton promotes the candidacy of Dr. King for the pastorship of Riverside Church throughout this letter. Britton also asserts that New York is in need of Dr. King's leadership and sermons.

Letter from Vivian Dilday to MLK

Mrs. Theodore A. Dilday writes Dr. King on behalf of the Committee on Benevolences of The Riverside Church in New York. Enclosed with the letter is a $1,000 check for the SCLC.

Letter to MLK from Bertha Fiege Regarding Speech at Riverside Church

In this letter, Bertha Fiege is commending Dr. King on his speech at Riverside Church. She feels he serves great importance to furthering unity, not only racially, but around the world as well.

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