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Support Correspondence

Associated Archive Content : 1902 results

A Blind Woman's Request for MLK

Juilia Lockheart, a blind 75 year old woman, requests aid from Dr. King. Many people envisioned Dr. King to be the savior of their time; they would contact him with unrelated requests outside of the non-violent movement in hopes that he could be the remedy to their current issue.

A Gift from Mr. and Mrs. Digioia to MLK

Greta B. Digioia expresses how she and her husband have come to know Dr. King as a "symbol" of his race. She then offers Dr. King a one-of-a-kind gift.

A Request for a Yearbook Statement

Carolyn Olson, the co-editor of the South Kitsap High School year book staff, requests a statement from Dr. King to include in the school's year book. Olson informs Dr. King that the yearbook's "Stand Up and Be Counted" theme is intended to encourage "independence and individualism" among the student body by implanting new ideas in students' minds and challenging old stereotypes. The sender asks that Dr. King join other public figures in writing a statement regarding how young people can "Stand Up and Be Counted."

Acrostic Poem About MLK

Adolf G. H. Kreiss shows his immense support and gratitude for Dr. King's fight for equality with an acrostic poem using the initials of the civil rights leader.

American Clergymen's Committee for Vietnamese War Relief

The American Clergymen's Committee for Vietnamese War Relief requests that Dr. King join them in sending medical supplies to North Vietnam. They also explain the difficulties they are receiving from the government to obtain a Treasury Department License which would enable them to assist in the war relief. Lastly, the committee informs Dr. King of how other churches have made generous contributions to help with relief for the Vietnam War.

American Foundation on Nonviolence

As Honorary Chairman of the American Foundation on Nonviolence, Dr. King presents a draft letter in which he calls for individuals to tackle the issues of voter registration, non-violence training, and protection of civil rights leaders by joining the organization and serving on its Board of Directors. Dr. King himself pledges $25,000 of his Nobel Peace Prize funds to the American Foundation on Nonviolence.

Anonymous Letter from Jail - Birmingham, AL

In this letter an anonymous writer shares his gratitude for all the support extended as Dr. King and his colleagues were incarcerated at a jail in Birmingham, AL.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous supporter sends an encouraging letter to Dr. King.

Anonymous Support for MLK

An anonymous individual expresses his or her support and concerns about Dr. King's affiliation with presidential candidate John F. Kennedy.

Appeal from Wyatt Tee Walker for Albany Support

Following the arrests of Dr. King and three others who held a prayer vigil at the Albany, Georgia City Hall, Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker issues this appeal for support from those active in the civil rights movement. He calls for telegrams to be sent to federal, state, and local officials, prayer vigils, and the wearing of black armbands.

Appreciation Letter from MLK to Maitland Griggs

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for Maitland Griggs contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Appreciation Letter to MLK

President John F. Kennedy writes Dr. King expressing appreciation for his support during this difficult time. President Kennedy is referring to the death of his second son, Patrick Bouvier Kennedy, who died two days after his birth August 7, 1963.

Award Letter from Stanley Faulkner to the SCLC

Stanley Faulkner, Chairman of the Edward K. Barsky Fund writes to convey the fund's admiration for the valuable work the SCLC puts forward in the field of civil rights. As a result of SCLC's efforts the fund makes a sizable contribution in the amount of $500 for which they requested no publicity be given.

Birthday Card from Isaac Stotts to MLK

Isaac Stotts sends birthday wishes to Dr. King on his 39th birthday.

Birthday Card from Leola Whitted to MLK

Leola Whitted, a member of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama, wishes Dr. King a happy birthday.

Birthday Card from Margarite Foley

This birthday, wishing the recipient "increasing joy," was sent by Margarite Foley.

Birthday Card From Mrs. King to MLK

Mrs. King wishes Dr. King a happy birthday.

Birthday Card from Mrs. King to MLK

Mrs. King wishes Dr. King a happy birthday and expresses her love for him.

Birthday Card from Mrs. King to MLK

Mrs. King sends birthday wishes to Dr. King.

Birthday Card from The Men's Usher Board to MLK

The Men's Usher Board of Ebenezer Baptist Church wishes Dr. King a happy birthday.

Birthday Card to MLK

Elaine Stears and Family wish Dr. King a Happy Birthday.

Brochure: "Some Important Fiscal Facts about the SCLC"

This document contains information about SCLC's administration, role, duties, and actions that its staff fulfills with the money donated to the organization.

Card from Dr. and Mrs. H. R. Holman

Dr. & Mrs. H. R. Holman send a holiday card with wishes for a prosperous New Year.

Card from Joyce Anderson to MLK

Joyce Anderson sends Dr. King a "get well" card with a note of encouragement after he was stabbed by a woman in Harlem, New York.

Card From Marjorie Baker

Marjorie Baker sends a card expressing wishes to maintain courage until things are better.

Card from Sophia Anderson to MLK

Mrs. Sophia Anderson wishes Dr. King a speedy recovery.

Card from the English Family

The English Family sends a card that lists words of encouragement for each day of the week.

Catholics Involved in Integration

Members of Catholics Involved in Integration write a letter to solicit membership to their organization. The cost to join the group is one dollar per month. The funds raised are donated to Dr. King in support of his efforts to gain peace, freedom, and equality.

Christmas Card from Mrs. King to MLK

Mrs. King sends holiday greetings to Dr. King.

Condolence Letter to Mrs. King from Charles Ocasio

This letter from a middle school student in New York City is a letter of condolence written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

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