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Nonviolence

Associated Archive Content : 48 results

A Challenge to the Churches and Synagogues

In this document, Dr. King addressed the Conference on Religion and Race in Chicago, Illinois. He reprimands the Church and Synagogue for being silent or being a "silent partner of the status quo." Dr. King tells them that they must recapture its focus on human rights or risk becoming irrelevant. In closing, Dr. King challenges himself along with these religious institutions to make a choice; either continue to follow the "status quo" or "give ourselves unreservedly to God and his kingdom."

A Christian Movement in a Revolutionary Age

In this address, Dr. King fuses the philosophies in the Old and New Testament regarding revolutionary social change. He argues that the most creative and constructive revolutionary force for change is one that combines the Old Testament’s “righteousness and justice that flow down like a mighty stream” with the New Testament’s call to love one’s enemies and bless those who persecute you. He asserts that God has been working actively since the time of Moses for the freedom and perfection of people and society. Dr.

A Christmas Sermon

Dr. King discusses the topics of peace, the state of mankind, and his vision for the future during the delivery of this sermon to the congregation of Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia.

Address by MLK at 47th NAACP Annual Convention

Dr. King addresses the audience at the 47th NAACP annual convention in San Francisco, California. King begins with background information of slavery and its physical and mental effects on Africans, then tells the "Montgomery Story." This story begins with a mental transformation among blacks, which led to the Montgomery boycott. As a result of the boycott, blacks were empowered and began fighting injustice and seeking changes in unfair legislation.

American Journal: Let Justice Roll Down

Carey McWilliams writes to Dr. King to inform him his article, "Let Justice Roll Down," was included in the American Journal, a publication by the US Information Service aimed at representing opinions and current subjects of interest in the United States. This edition, published in 1965, was he 5th year in a row Dr. King had contributed an article describing the tempo of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States.

Bayard Rustin: Goals and Strategies

In this speech, given before Bowdoin College in 1964, Bayard Rustin outlines the basis of civil rights issues currently being fought for. He argues that man must come together as one and face the problem with our society, and that African Americans see the problems with society more than other races because they are struggling to bring civil rights and social change to all.

Catholic Interracial Council Newsletter Honoring MLK

This 1965 newsletter from the Catholic Interracial Council honors Dr. King with the Pacem in Terris Peace and Freedom Award.

Dr. King Leaves Montgomery for Atlanta

This news release announces Dr. King's decision to resign as Pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama and move to Atlanta, Georgia. Relocating to Atlanta will enable Dr. King to Co-Pastor Ebenezer Baptist Church with his father, and will leave him in close proximity to the SCLC.

Draft of MLK's An Open Letter to Negro Youth

In an open letter to Negro Youths, Dr. King urges them to stay committed to the nonviolent principles of social change in their plight to gain broad access to education and employment.

Entering 1964: Toward Full Emancipation

In this draft of an article for the NY Amsterdam News, Dr. King asserts that the thrust of the Negro will increase toward full emancipation as they began the year 1964. Dr. King highlights the March on Washington where both Negroes and whites collectively demonstrated the need for self-respect and human dignity in the United States. He also elaborates on the technique of "selective patronage" to broaden the economic and employment opportunities for the African American community.

Face the Nation Interview

This is a transcript of an August 1965 interview of Dr. King on the CBS television news program Face the Nation. King is asked to comment on numerous issues facing American society including the conflict in Vietnam, civil rights, housing and birth control.

Institute for Human Relations LBJ Leaflet

The Office of Economic Opportunity republished this spotlight on President Johnson's War on Poverty from Look Magazine in June 1967. The editors discuss the "poverty of opportunity" plaguing nearly 1 in every 6 Americans, saying that Johnson's War on Poverty makes an attempt to combat the economic conditions of America's most vulnerable, including Negro Americans. The articles also shed light on the numerous shortcomings the Johnson Administration-supported legislation has encountered amongst legislators and the American public.

Is It All Right To Break The Law?

Excerpts from Dr. King's 1963 "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" are used to establish an affirmative answer to the question, "Is It All Right to Break The Law?"

King Plans Capital Shantytown 'In a Tumbledown Shack'

This article describes Dr. King's plans, as observed by a detractor, for the 1968 March of Poor People to Washington.  The Associated Press reports that shacks and poor people from all over the nation will descend on the nation's capital to make the nation aware of their presence. President Lyndon B. Johnson, when reached for comment, said he hoped to work with the groups.

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

This version of Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail," published by the American Friends Service Committee, also includes the original statement made by the clergyman that prompted Dr. King's response. The eight clergymen described Dr. King's actions as "unwise and untimely." In his response, Dr. King references biblical and historical figures to illustrate why the Civil Rights Movement can no longer wait. He also expresses his frustration with many within organized religion and the moderate white American.

Letter from Esther G. Stone to MLK

Esther G. Stone writes to Dr. King to express her opinions on Negro leadership, American politics, and the Vietnam War. Stone writes that President Lyndon Johnson has done so much for Negroes and that Mrs. Johnson did not deserve the hurtful remarks of Eartha Kitt.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. J. T. Brent

Dr. King responds to a letter from Mrs. Brent by explaining his views about love and its place in the Civil Rights Movement. He affirms that "it is through love and understanding that we approach the segregationist." He mentions that striking out in any act of violence is not condoned by leaders of the movement.

Letter from MLK to Rabbi Everett Gendler

Dr. King thanks Rabbi Gendler for his significant contribution to the SCLC. He asserts that the financial contributions will aid in the SCLC's political and social agendas in Danville, Virginia.

Letter From Rabbi and Mrs. Gendler

Rabbi and Mrs. Gendler sends their support and best wishes to the S.C.L.C, C.O.R.E, and S.N.C.C for their efforts towards violence, Vietnam, and human dignity.

Letter from Rev. J. H. Cole to Roy Wilkins and MLK

Rev. Cole writes to Dr. King and Roy Wilkins of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) to convey his disgust at the treatment of Negroes in such areas as housing, education, politics and police brutality. He suggests the initiation of a nationwide letter writing campaign to every member of Congress to highlight this treatment and seeks a program that will provide Negroes with jobs skills. Cole also encloses a letter he sent to President Johnson and Attorney General Ramsey Clark regarding Congress' disregard of "racial discontent."

Los Angeles Times: Prophetic Talk of Dr. King

Carl Greenberg, Political Editor for the Los Angeles Times, wrote this editorial about Dr. King's final trip to California and his opinion on the 1968 Presidential Campaign. Mr. Greenberg describes Dr. King's assessment of the war on poverty, the 1968 Democratic National Convention and possible support for Eugene McCarthy or Robert Kennedy.

Meet the Press Interview

This is a transcript of NBC television's Meet the Press interview with Dr. King in August 1967 with Edwin Newman as moderator. King answered questions about his views on the Vietnam conflict, nonviolence, and the presidency of Lyndon B. Johnson.

MLK Announces End of Birmingham Campaign

The Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights released these remarks by Dr. King marking the end of the Birmingham Nonviolent Direct Action Campaign. King describes the day as a climax in the long struggle for justice and freedom in Birmingham and gives credit to Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, to the thousands who went to jail, to the whites who worked for just solutions and to God. He speaks of the need for continued progress toward equal job opportunities, equal access to public facilities, and equal rights and responsibilities.

Newsmakers Interview with MLK

Los Angeles' Channel 2 interviews Dr. King for its Newsmakers program. Topics include King's call for a negotiated settlement in Vietnam and the resulting criticism by other civil rights leaders, plans for mass demonstrations in Los Angeles on the poverty bill, King's position on the armed group called the Deacons and his commitment to nonviolence, and how he responds to the personal threats on his life.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

In this lecture delivered the day after he received the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King describes the major evils of the world as racial injustice, poverty and war. He presents a vision of a World House in which people learn to transcend differences in race, culture, ideas and religion and learn to live together in peace.

One Vote for Every Man: Civil Rights Act

In this draft of an article for the March 1965 IUD Agenda, an AFL-CIO monthly publication, Dr. King recounts the progress made by the Civil Rights Movement and states that the issue in 1965 is the right to vote and the venue is Selma, Alabama. He discusses the pattern of exclusion, including the abuse of power by local sheriffs, illegal use of local and state laws, delay tactics of registrars, and literacy tests. He outlines measures that a Civil Rights Act of 1965 should include.

Open Letter from MLK to Negro Youth

In the wake of the urban uprisings of 1966, Dr. King writes an open letter to Negro youth empathizing with their desire to return to school and to find jobs. He mentions that he's written the President urging funding so all poor children can attend school and advocating implementation of a public works program to provide jobs for youth. He encourages young people to abstain from violence as ineffective in achieving their goals.

People In Action: The Complete Life

Dr. King was in jail in Birmingham and unable to contribute his regular column to the New York Amsterdam News. The editors published these excerpts from a sermon he had recently given at Riverside Church on "The Dimensions of a Complete Life."

Press Release for Catholic Interracial Council Award

The Catholic Interracial Council of Chicago announces that Dr. King will be awarded the John F. Kennedy Annual Award at their 1964 benefit dinner as a tribute to his leadership. According to polls published in Newsweek magazine, Dr. King's leadership was prized "more than any other single Negro."

Preview of the "Dream" at Detroit March

Two months before the famous "I Have a Dream" speech at the March on Washington, King used many of the same words, rhetorical techniques, and themes. King expresses gratitude and inspiration and warns against hatred and separatism at what he thinks is the largest US demonstration to date, a march in Detroit June 23, 1963. The legacy of slavery and segregation induced a false sense of inferiority in Negroes.

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