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Voter Registration

Associated Archive Content : 527 results

Letter from Dora McDonald to William Grayson

Dora McDonald informs William Grayson that Dr. King's schedule does not permit him to make any more appearances in the year of 1962. Miss McDonald expresses her deep apologies for Dr. King's inabilities to attend.

Letter from Dorothy Cotton to Mrs. E.A. Johnson

Educational Consultant Dorothy Cotton writes workshop attendee Mrs. E.A. Johnson concerning the importance of citizenship education, particularly in getting Negroes to vote. She addresses a concern of Mrs. Johnson's involving a young man invited to attend a citizenship workshop. Ms. Cotton informs Mrs. Johnson that Dr. King will speak with Attorney General Robert Kennedy in addressing the young man's situation.

Letter from Dorothy Gaines to Josephine Davis

Dorothy Gaines thanks Josephine Davis and her friends for their generous donation to the SCLC. Gaines explains the current efforts of the SCLC as well as the monthly budget of the organization. She expresses the importance of financial contributions and encloses receipts from the donation.

Letter from Dr. J. H. Young to MLK

Dr. J. H. Young writes this letter to Dr. King about slavery, the Civil War, and President Lincoln. He reminds Dr. King that the Civil War was fought not over slavery, but succession.

Letter from Edwin Berry to Jane Lee J. Eddy

Edwin Berry, Executive Director of the Chicago Urban League, writes Jane Lee Eddy, Secretary of the Taconic Foundation, to request funding for a "get-out-the-vote campaign" in Chicago.

Letter from Eric McRae to MLK

Eric McRae, a fourth grade student from Lincoln School, writes to Dr. King for his efforts to promote voter registration with the Freedom Marches in Selma, Alabama.

Letter from Franklin I. Gamwell with Enclosed Copy of the Interracial News Service Newsletter

Franklin I. Gamwell, of the Student Interracial Ministry, requests if Dr. King would like to have an intern student at Ebenezer Baptist Church for 1963.
Interracial News Service describes the experiences of many Student Interracial Ministry participants and the pastors of the churches they spent the summers with.

Letter from Frieda E. Isenberg to MLK

Frieda Isenberg collected money from various friends and co-workers to support the cause of freedom in the South. The total contribution given was $22.00.

Letter from G. Cacciatore to Mr. Ivan Cameron

In this letter, the Chief of Foreign Operation from the United States Department of State, responds to Ivan C. Cameron recent letter rearding voting in foreign political elections by United States citizens.

Letter from Genevieve Young to Joan Daves

Genevieve Young expresses her opinion about the outline for Dr. King's upcoming book "Where Do We Go From Here?" She offers some suggestions and strategies to Joan Daves to help narrow the scope of the manuscript.

Letter from George W. Monroe to President Johnson

A former employee of the US Naval Air Station in Jacksonville, Florida, George Monroe, writes again to President Johnson regarding an injury he received and the discrimination he was met with in trying to receive his sick pay and disability benefits. President Johnson had given Monroe's complaint to the Commanding Officer of the USNA in Jacksonville, however, Monroe was still facing difficulty getting help and wrote again to President Johnson to ask for his help. Dr.

Letter from Glen Nixon to SCLC

Glen Nixon offers to participate in the SCLC's Chicago project in order to gain a better understanding of Northern slums. Nixon asks to be referred to other programs and organizations, if his assistance is not needed in Chicago.

Letter from Governor Nelson Rockefeller to MLK

Governor Nelson Rockefeller encloses a contribution of $5,000 to the SCLC and discusses the forthcoming voter registration drive in which the SCLC will conduct.

Letter from Harry H. Wachtel to Charles W. Englehard

Harry Wachtel writes Charles Englehard thanking him for his payment of $5,000 toward a $15,000 pledge to The American Foundation On Nonviolence. He states that his initial contribution was extremely helpful in registering African Americans in Mississippi and other southern states.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to Owen Hungerford Regarding Finances

Harry Wachtel informs Owen Hungerford that Dr. King has approved the enclosed financial statement. Relative tax exemption material is also forwarded.

Letter from Herman E. Talmadge to MLK

Senator Herman E. Talmadge expresses his views on the poll tax with reference to the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Letter from Hosea Williams to Attorney Solomon Seay, Jr.

Reverend Williams writes to Attorney Seay requesting advance notice, of three to four weeks, for persons appearing in court. He also states that it would be helpful if he would give the dates of the arrests and the charges.

Letter from James Dombrowski to Mrs. King

In this letter, James Dombrowski of the Southern Conference Educational Fund requests financial contributions from Mrs. Coretta S. King for a proposed publication to be entitled "The Color Line in Voting." The initial prototype publication would include the stories of Gus Courts and George W. Lee, who were assassinated, after refusing to remove their names from a voter registration list in Humphreys County, Mississippi.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Joan Daves, Literary Agent to Dr. King, addresses the correspondence, to Dr. King. The letter includes photostats of reviews for Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The Chicago Tribune, New York Times Daily and Washington Star are just a couple of the newspapers that published reviews for the book.

Letter from John A. Clark to MLK Regarding Scriptures, Spiritual Advice and Prayer

In this letter, Reverend John A. Clark provides spiritual advice, scripture and prayer for Dr. King during hard times as well as for preparation of the future. Reverend John A. Clark also mentions starting a revival and revisiting Washington to D.C. to preach for a cause.

Letter from John M. Thornton to MLK

John M. Thorton invites Dr. King to speak at the Citizenship Award Banquet hosted by the National Capital Voters Association, in order to encourage the 425,000 Negro citizens of Washington, DC to vote in the upcoming presidential election.

Letter from Joseph McKinney to MLK

Reverend Lee Wright invites Dr. King to speak at the Annual Spring Membership Campaign for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Wheeling Branch in West Virginia.

Letter from Joyce Armstrong to MLK

Joyce Armstrong of Detroit, Michigan expresses concern regarding segregation and equality in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Laverne Gobble to MLK

Laverne B. Gobble encloses a publication entitled "Your Vote Makes a Difference," and informs Dr. King of the Votemobile schedule. She also expresses that if he is interested she can assist with educating members of his organization about voting.

Letter from Leonard Kane to MLK

Leonard Kane, Chairman of the Democratic Town Committee, sends Dr. King a financial contribution on behalf of the committee. He also expresses the importance of democracy for all.

Letter From Leslie W. Dunbar

Leslie Dunbar outlines information regarding a grant and various agency protocols from the Southern Regional Council for voter registration.

Letter from Linda Gillies to MLK

Chairman of the Choice '68 Steering Committee, Linda Gillies asks Dr. King about his stance on referendum issues. Topics that Dr. King was asked to respond to included King's opinion on what military action the U.S. should have in Vietnam, the course of action the US should pursue regarding bombing North Vietnam and governmental spending.

Letter from Lymell Carter to MLK

Reverend Lymell Carter, Minister of Wesley Chapel C.M.E. Church, informs Dr. King that the Clarksville community is in need of his appearance. Reverend Carter details the racial demographics of the Tennessee town and the minimal voting capacity of the African American population. He notes the urgency of Dr. King's appearance to assist with the issues of integration and necessary political influence of the black community.

Letter from Margery Bray to MLK

Margery Bray writes Dr. King discussing how the women in America were engaged in similar demonstrations to secure their right to vote. Bray states that legislation is the only way to efficiently change things, and admits that she has recently become an active voter.

Letter from Mark Cohen to MLK

Mark Cohen, of the Political Union of Central High School, requests for Dr. King to speak at the school regarding peace and civil rights on the same day he's addressing the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom in Philadelphia.

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