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Southern Christian Leadership Conference--Assaults Against

Associated Archive Content : 17 results

Anti-Semitism, Israel and SCLC:- A Statement on Press Distortions

This is a document that addresses the impression that the press created reporting that the SCLC was part of a group that condemned Israel and endorsed the policies of the Arab powers. This document also includes the annual report of the president by Dr. King.

King and SCLC Meet in Montgomery

This press release announces a mass meeting held in Montgomery, Alabama by the Executive Board of SCLC. The meeting was held in response to a major libel suit against four prominent SCLC officials. Dr. King gives an address to boost morale during the course of this suit. In Dr. King's view, "The South has lost its solidity. Whites fight against whites over desegregation. Be it known, evil cannot permanently organize itself." The libel suit came to be known as the New York Times Company vs. Sullivan (1960).

Letter from Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall to MLK

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General, responds to Dr. King's telegram regarding the assault of Rev. Paul Chapman. Marshall informs him that evidence has failed to disclose any "violation of a federal criminal statute," so the Department of Justice is unable to take action.

Letter from Chip Hawkins to MLK

In this letter, Chip Hawkins questions Dr. King's affiliation with communist organizations and individuals. In addition, he requests that Dr. King publicly address the Communist accusations brought against him.

Letter from Marlys Michels to MLK

Miss Michels informs Dr. King that she will no longer contribute to the SCLC. She disagrees with Dr. King's statements on the Vietnam War, as well as his support of Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from MLK to a Former Supporter

This is an edited copy of Dr. King's response to someone withdrawing support due to his position on the Vietnam War. King's detailed rewrites show efforts to avoid further misunderstandings about his position. He applies nonviolent philosophies to both the civil rights and peace movements, however, does not attempt to link the two. Rather than asking for Negroes to be exempt from the draft as a special privilege, he believes Negroes have an intimate knowledge of the effects of violence. As such, they should have a special moral obligation not to inflict violence on others.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Benjamin Hooks

In this letter Dr. King solicits the help of Mr. Hooks regarding allegations that SCLC associate Hosea Williams purchased stolen automobiles for SCLC. Dr. King asserts that the allegations should be investigated fully and enlists the aid of Benjamin Hooks, Chauncey Eskridge, and Joe Lowery.

Letter Withdrawing Support From Gordon Delsemer to Dr. King

This letter dated October 20, 1967, was sent to Dr. King from Gordon H. Delsemer. Mr. Delsemer is withdrawing his support from the SCLC because of the "anti-Semitic" statements he believes were made by certain black leaders.

MLK Requests Federal Protection from US Attorney General

Dr. King sends this urgent request for protection to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach. Negro citizens were brutalized while protesting the arrest of James Orange. Alabama State Troopers prevented protestors from seeking medical attention by refusing to allow them to leave Zion Methodist Church.

SCLC News Bulletin for November 1967

This November 1967 news bulletin published by the SCLC contains updates regarding progress of the Civil Rights Movement, excerpts from the President's Annual Report and financial facts for the organization's supporters.

SCLC Newsletter: August 1963

This is volume one of the SCLC Newsletter, printed for the month and year of August 1963. Several topics are covered including; the March on Washington, Rebuilding Bombed Churches, the WCLC, and Negro voting registration.

SCLC Newsletter: March 1963

SCLC highlights its affiliate activities, fundraisers and efforts to rebuild burned churches in this newsletter from March of 1963. One of the cover stories focuses on the repeal of segregation laws in Albany, Georgia. The "Profile of the Month" article features Milton A. Reid and discusses his contributions to the Civil Rights Movement.

SCLC Warns of Disaster in Mississippi

The SCLC issues a statement regarding a fire that destroyed their office at the Bell Flower Baptist Church in Grenada, Mississippi. The SCLC set up a new office in Grenada to continue programs including school integration, voter registration, and development of community leadership.

Telegram Called in From Attorney General Nicholas Deb Katzenbach to MLK

Katzenbach responds to an urgent telegram from Dr. King concerning State Troopers that had trapped Demonstrators inside a church and refused to let them obtain medical attention. Katzenbach tells Dr. King that he is aware of the situation and that the Department Attorneys and the FBI were already on the scene in both Selma and Marion and investigations had already begun.

Telegram from MLK and Wyatt Walker to Burke Marshall

Dr. King and Wyatt Walker send an urgent request for Burke Marshall to investigate the bombing of SCLC Board Member C. O. Simpkins' home in Shreveport, Louisiana. The two SCLC officials inform Mr. Marshall that the suspects were released for lack of evidence despite other information to the contrary.

Terror in Louisiana

The article describes the terrorist actions occurring within the area of north Louisiana. An African American dentist by the name of C.O. Simpkins was one of the victims targeted due to his activism in Civil Rights. Due to Simpkins large presence within the movement, his house was bombed and burned down. This is just one example of the constant hatred and violence many African Americans had to go through to gain equality within the South.

The SCLC and Leadership of MLK

The various protest mechanisms and action organizations serves as a long lasting contribution to the Negro community initiated by the movement in the South. The church has served as a location for organization which progresses community participation. During slavery, the slaves were allowed to congregate only at weddings and funerals. Many of these events were fabricated in order to create a means of collective communication between the slaves. The author asserts that it was in this tradition that the SCLC was formed.