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Electoral Politics

Associated Archive Content : 206 results

Letter from Sandra A. Lonsfoote to MLK

Sandra A. Lonsfoote, Campus Coordinator at Bethel College, writes Dr. King requesting campaign information for the Choice 68' campaign.

Letter from Silas K. Brown to MLK

Mr. Brown requests the help of Dr. King and the SCLC on behalf of Reverend U.S. Gilliam. Reverend Gilliam, the first Negro to run for public office in Grenada, Mississippi, is under attack by whites in his community.

Letter from the Georgia Voter's League

Hosea Williams and P. B. McCoy, co-chairmen of the Georgia Voter's League, inform members of the organization that Dr. King will be addressing their 1968 annual convention.

Letter from Thomas C. McGarth to MLK

Congressman Thomas C. McGarth writes to Dr. King concerning recent challenges surrounding the seating of the Mississippi Congressional Delegation. McGarth discusses his involvement with the voting process.

Letter from Tony Schrader to MLK

Tony Schrader informs Dr. King that his college is sponsoring a primary on campus for Choice '68. Schrader requests "any free campaign materials or statements of policies of Dr. King."

Letter from Victor Sharrow to MLK

Victor Sharrow requests a meeting with Dr. King to discuss implementing state and federal plans purportedly suggested by President Johnson. Mr. Sparrow believes that decreasing the number of racist southern representatives will have a collateral affect on southern apportionment of presidential electors.

Letter from W. L. Overholser to MLK

W.L. Overholser of Winnimac, Indiana proposes that the SCLC change its tactics and support the Peace Welfare Party that he is forming. He maintains that, because too few people control too much of the country's wealth, a lack of jobs creates too much feuding and racial prejudice. Overholser argues that neither party can serve both the richest 10%, who control all the wealth, and the other 90% of the country, because the disparity makes most politicians two-faced. Overholser feels that whites and blacks should focus on forming a new party, and asks Dr.

Letter from Weston E. Vivian to MLK

Congressman Weston Vivian responds to Dr. King's letter regarding the seating of the Mississippi Congressman. He tells Dr. King that he not only supported the "Ryan fairness resolution" to prevent the seating, but also voted against the motion to swear in the Congressman. Although he mentions that he was in the minority regarding this matter, he assures Dr. King that he will continue to "work for the opening of the Mississippi registration and election procedures."

Letter from William Adams to MLK

William Adams from the New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary writes Dr. King informing him of political matters in New York City, which may hinder the civil rights efforts of African Americans.

Letter from William L. Hungate to MLK

Congressman Hungate challenges allegations made by Dr. King in a recent telegram regarding the Mississippi Delegation. Dr. King states, "A vote to seat the Mississippi delegation is a vote for organized violence, murder, and oppression." However, Congressman Hungate implies that Dr. King's claim is dubious unless he has sufficient evidence to support it. In closing, Congressman Hungate assures Dr. King of his allegiance to "real progress" while disapproving of "headline-hunting tactics."

Letter from William T. Murphy to MLK

Mr. Murphy, a representative of the United States Congress, writes to Dr. King to convey his intentions to support the House of Judiciary Committee Voting Rights bill.

Letter to Ralph Abernathy Offering Suggestions

A supporter of the civil rights movement writes this letter to Reverend Abernathy. It is suggested that the Negro leaders of the civil rights movement consider the voting power of senior citizens. In order to get "a massive single solid vote bloc" it would be advantageous to also include the poor population. With this amount of supporters, the writer believes it would be possible to sustain a presidential candidacy. The author continues by telling Abernathy of Russia's economic goal.

Letters from Irvine I. Turner to MLK

Irvine I. Turner requests, in three different letters, Dr. King provide an endorsement for reelection to the Newark Municipal Council.

Los Angeles Times: Prophetic Talk of Dr. King

Carl Greenberg, Political Editor for the Los Angeles Times, wrote this editorial about Dr. King's final trip to California and his opinion on the 1968 Presidential Campaign. Mr. Greenberg describes Dr. King's assessment of the war on poverty, the 1968 Democratic National Convention and possible support for Eugene McCarthy or Robert Kennedy.

Meeting on National Negro Politics

The Meeting on National Negro Politics highlights congressional races with "the most potential for political gains by black Americans" in the 1968 elections.

Memo to SCLC Contributors

This memo from the SCLC Staff highlights political activity taking place in Louisville, Kentucky, Blue Ridge, Georgia, and Cleveland, Ohio. The organization had used the energy from demonstrations to fuel voter registration campaigns. They share stories of collaborations and success that have resulted from their efforts.

Memorandum from Stanley Levison Regarding Congressman Powell

This memorandum from Mr. Levison concerns legal issues regarding Congressman Adam Clayton Powell. His position is that those issues, valid or not, need examination in the overall context of "the real issue...the undemocratic nature of the congressional system."

MLK Address at Mass Meeting in Eutaw, Alabama

Dr. King challenges the Negro residents of Eutaw, Alabama to participate in the upcoming SCLC Poor People's Campaign. In this address, he urges the citizens of Eutaw to occupy Washington, D.C. in an effort to press Congress for a redistribution of wealth in America. He urges, "All ye who are tired of segregation and discrimination, come unto us. All ye who are overworked and underpaid, come unto us."

MLK Address at Park Sheraton Hotel

Dr. King gives an address commemorating the one hundredth anniversary of the passage of the Emancipation Proclamation. In the celebratory speech, he calls all Americans to take action in applying the principles of the Emancipation Proclamation to society. Dr. King states that the commands of the Proclamation have fallen short in practice and that it will take a cumulative effort from every citizen to undo this process.

MLK Advocates Registering to Vote

Dr. King urges individuals to join the "march to Freedom" by becoming a registered voter. Dr. King asserts that voting will help educate children, obtain a minimum wage law, and create the opportunity for better medical care.

MLK on the Seating of Julian Bond

Georgia State Legislature has refused to seat Representative-Elect Julian Bond. Dr. King expresses his disdain for the social injustice. His plan of action is to combat this prejudice by rallying members of the white and black community to engage in protest.

MLK Press Conference and Speech Notes

Dr. King stresses that his appearance to Cleveland is not in the interest of the candidates but to urge the people to exercise their political and moral responsibility.

MLK Remarks at the Launching of SCLC's Crusade for Citizenship

Dr. King delivered this speech at a launch meeting for the Crusade for Citizenship in Miami, Florida. He discusses the denial of African Americans' right to vote by relating it to other former disfranchised Americans such as those who did not own property and women. Dr. King discusses the hypocrisy in some American officials' advocacy of democratic election in other European countries as well as the social and economic welfare of all Americans.

MLK Speech at the Americana Hotel

Dr. King compares the Maritimer Union's struggle for improved working conditions to the continuous fight for civil rights in the African American community.

MLK's Newsweek Statement

Dr. King issues a statement on the defeat of a federal agency that would have allowed an African American to obtain a cabinet position within the national government.

MLK's Statement on Current Electoral Politics

This is the draft of a statement that Dr. King planned to make, concerning the state of politics in America. Dr. King expresses his disappointment in that "the quality of some of the men elected makes a mockery of responsible government," and urges African-Americans to "lose faith in a shallow 'good will' that provides nothing."

MLK's Statement on Endorsing a 1960 Presidential Candidate

Dr. King states that the SCLC is a non-partisan organization and that he cannot endorse a political party or candidate. He then goes on to express gratitude for Senator Kennedy and Mayor Hartsfield for their continuous support and leadership.

Negroes See No Future for King as National Leader, Except in Politics

Almena Lomax discusses the public opinions of African Americans on Dr. King being elected to a national office.

Pamphlet About the Black Panther Party

This pamphlet contains historical and contextual references to the Black Panther Party. It also includes a speech by John Hulett and an interview of Stokely Carmichael highlighting the political and social movements occurring in Lowndes County, Alabama.

Peace and Freedom Party

The Peace and Freedom Party was originally established in the Northern region of California in 1967. This pamphlet features the party's political platform in addition to voter registration procedures.

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