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Black Power

The term Black Power was first popularly used by Student Nonviolent
Coordinating Committee (SNCC) organizers Stokely Carmichael (a.k.a.
Kwame Toure) and Willie Ricks (a.k.a. Mukasa Dada) at the 1966 March
Against Fear. As a political movement of the late 1960s and early
1970s, it denoted a range of ideologies. Proponents of Black Power
tended to be in conflict with the mainstream Civil Rights Movement.
Organizations such as SNCC, the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) and
later the Black Panther Party publicly renounced emphasis on
integration and nonviolent protest and instead adopted militant
language to emphasize race pride and the formation of autonomous
political and cultural institutions to promote black collective
interests. The term “Black is Beautiful” and the Black
Arts Movement are generally associated with the concept.

Associated Archive Content : 165 results

The Business Card of the Honorable Al Shabazz (Malcolm X)

During the late 1950s, Malcolm X began going by Malik Al-Shabazz. Shabazz, according to the Nation of Islam, was a Black Nation in central Africa from which all human beings descended. While the date of this card is unknown, it is presumed to be circa the late 1950s to early 1960s, before Malcolm X split from the Nation of Islam in 1964.

The Crisis - NAACP 50 Years - Freedom Civil Rights Progress

This 1959 issue of The Crisis celebrates the 50th anniversary of the NAACP. The contents include events that vary from legislation cases to African-American accomplishments relevant to the time.

The Dilemma of White America

This early draft of the Racism and the White Backlash chapter of Dr. King's Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? explores the history and philosophy of white supremacy. King insists the current status of Negroes is the direct result of oppression by whites, who have developed delusional beliefs to justify their historic acts of colonization and slavery.

The Gary Crusader: The World of Books

This review of Dr. King's "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" highlights his examination of the Black Power movement as well as his emphasis on non-violence.

The Lonesome Road

Stanley D. Levison sends Dr. King an article from The Washington Post titled "The Lonesome Road," which is a review of Dr. Kings book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Martin Duberman, the author of the article, explains Dr. King's reasons for writing the book, and Duberman also provides a favorable review of the publication.

The Many Faces of Black Power

The author identifies several approaches to the notion of Black Power. The author concludes that Black Power is "a programmatic concept capable of objective definition", "it presents many difficulties", and that the negatives have outweighed the positives.

The New York Times: Books of The Times Storm Warnings

Eliot Fremont-Smith examines Dr. King's stance on the term of Black Power, his views on political power for Negroes and his focus on nonviolence.

The Story of Snick

"From Freedom High to Black Power," by Gene Roberts, describes the opposing views voiced by SNCC and Dr. King regarding the civil rights movement. SNCC asserts a message of violence and black power, while Dr. King promotes a philosophy of love and nonviolence.

The World of Books

This is a broad review of Dr. King's publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The article also notes that this was the first book Dr. King has released since his acceptance of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964.

Two Americas

This essay highlights the realities of poverty stricken aliens in an affluent society. Through its examination of Negro-white relations, urban riots, and the War on Poverty, the author insists that the nonviolent struggle for civil rights must continue.

Vote of Confidence for Negro Leader

In this editorial, a study of 300 negro in 13 cities, was conducted to determine the public attitude towards Dr. King.

Where Do We Go From Here (Chapter V Draft)

This draft of Where Are We Going?, Chapter 5 of Dr. King's book Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? was significantly edited before publication but the central ideas are here. The government's failure to develop economic justice programs cannot be blamed on the Civil Rights Movement's lack of ideas, as often claimed. Building the political will for change is more important for the movement. The rights of Negroes to economic well-being are well aligned with goals and tactics of the labor movement. Negro leadership needs to be developed from within the community.

Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?

Dr. King outlines the ten chapters of his book "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

White Backlash Growing

The intensity in the Civil Rights Movement increased as blacks remained segregated and the Black Power movement gained popularity. White backlash increased during these times, but Dr. King noted that demonstrations "did not breed hate, but only revealed hatred that already existed."

WRAL- TV Broadcast Transcript of Viewpoint show

WRAL-TV Viewpoint #1790 is a critical review of the efforts of Stokely Carmichael and Dr. King. The speaker claims Dr. King uses the threat of riots in cities to blackmail the United States Congress into doing the bidding of the Black Power Movement.

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