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Poor People's Campaign

Associated Archive Content : 31 results

An Open Letter to Free Americans

In response to Dr. King's assassination, the author urges "Free Americans" to join the fight against racism.

Chicago Daily Defender: SCLC Aide Makes Spirited Capital March Call Here

The Chicago Daily Defender published this article about Rev. Ralph Abernathy's visit to Chicago to promote the Poor People's Campaign. According to Abernathy, "Come this summer, thousands of poor Americans are going to take their burdens to the White House and they'll leave them with LBJ."

Crisis In the Nation

Dr. King and Joseph E. Lowery inform an anonymous recipient of an urgent meeting of the SCLC Executive Board.

Hruska Says Capital...

Nebraska Senator Roman Hruska criticizes the Dr. King-led demonstrations and asserts that the government does not really know what the demonstrator's goals are.

Information about Poor People's Campaign

The Poor Peoples Campaign asserts that it will demand decent jobs and income for poor Americans of all races and ethnicities. Furthermore the Campaign vows to address constitutional and moral rights, along with the rights of exploited immigrants.

Letter from Charles S. Spivey, Jr. to the Racial Justice Committee

Charles S. Spivey, Jr. outlines the events to take place during the SCLC Poor Peoples Campaign under the leadership of Dr. King. The main events all transpired after Dr. King's assassination on April 4th, 1968.

Letter from Charles Wallace to MLK

Charles Wallace, a retired white high school teacher from California, offers his support to Dr. King for the implementation of the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. Wallace emphasizes that he has been a faithful supporter and participant in the civil rights movement. Wallace proposes to assist in the mobilization efforts to structure the campaign.

Letter from George A. Wiley to Rev. Andrew Young

George A. Wiley writes Reverend Andrew Young and other staff of the SCLC regarding National Welfare Rights Organization's (NWRO) participation with the Poor People's Campaign.

Letter from George Y. Sodowick to MLK

George Sodowick expresses to Dr. King disapproval of the planned Poor Peoples Campaign of 1968. Sodowick suggests that, instead of occupying Washington, the demonstrators should settle in and enhance "riot torn cities."

Letter from Hosea Williams to SCLC Field Staff

Hosea L. Williams writes project leaders and field staff focused on mobilizing field operatives for the Poor People's March on Washington 1968. Williams sets the procedures and guidelines for all fundraising activity.

Letter from Lucy Melhuish to MLK

Lucy A. Melhuish requests Dr. King's assistance in acquiring copies of speeches from the Poor People's March on Washington. Ms. Melhuish is a graduate student working on her doctorate degree at California State College.

Letter from Marie Brookter to MLK

Marie Brookter offers Dr. King "information as to the needs of the Poor" in preparation for the upcoming March of Poor People to Washington.

Letter from Paul Good to MLK

In this letter, Paul Good repeats his first attempt to volunteer as a "press liaison" for the SCLC, and presents Dr. King with his support for the Poor Peoples Campaign.

Letter from the Georgia Voter's League

Hosea Williams and P. B. McCoy, co-chairmen of the Georgia Voter's League, inform members of the organization that Dr. King will be addressing their 1968 annual convention.

Mass Meeting on Washington Poor People's Campaign

This program outlines the structure of a mass meeting led by the SCLC at Vermont Avenue Baptist Church in Washington, D.C. Among the speakers in attendance were Rev. Ralph David Abernathy and Dr. King.

Memo from Tom Offenburger to SCLC Field Staff

Tom Offenburger released this memo to members of SCLC's field staff concerning the advertisement of the 1968 Poor People's Campaign.

Poor People's Campaign

Dr. King is touring the nation to meet poor people in an effort to expose their living conditions. He also wants them to join the campaign to fight for better housing and jobs.

Poor People's Campaign 1968

This pamphlet produced by the Southern Christian Leadership Council promotes the Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D. C. for the spring of 1968.

Poor People's Campaign Food Contribution List

This document is a list of the preliminary food contributions for the SCLC's Poor People's Campaign.

Program from The Poor People's Campaign Committee for Nassau County

Dr. King delivers an address for the Poor People's Campaign Committee of Nassau County.

SCLC Booklet

This booklet describes the programs and actions of the SCLC. It explains why it is a movement organization as well as defining the King-Abernathy tradition.

SCLC Initiative Invitation: Poor People's Campaign Committee

This recruitment letter is an invitation to volunteer for various committees to support the SCLC's Washington, D.C. initiative Poor People's Campaign. The committees cover areas from child care to fundraising and legal aid. The Campaign began in November 1967, but became bogged down due not only to Dr. King's assassination, but also that of Robert F. Kennedy's. The Campaign ceased operations in June 1968 but was resurrected in December, 2003.

SCLC Memo on the Washington Campaign

Tom Offenburger announces a meeting concerning publicity for the 1968 Poor People's Campaign.

SCLC Memo- The Ministers Leadership Training Program

This memo reminds the Steering Committee and Executive Staff, of the SCLC, that "funds for the Ministers Leadership Training Program are not being used to finance currect SCLC direct-action programs."

SCLC Minutes

This undated and unsigned memorandum functions essentially as minutes for an SCLC strategy session.

SCLC Policy-Making Board to Meet in Washington, D.C. February 6-7

The SCLC Executive Board of Directors will hold its semi-annual meeting in Washington, D.C. They intend to discuss future projects as well as continuing projects.

Sermon at The Washington Cathedral

In a sermon written by Dr. King and addressed to an audience at the Washington Cathedral, the Reverend expounds upon the problem of poverty and war. In describing a projected human revolution, Dr. King states, "Somewhere we must come to see that human progress never rolls in on the wheels of inevitability." This is just one of the many passages in this inspirational sermon encouraging hope and freedom for all.

Telegram from ABC Network to Ralph David Abernathy

A correspondent from the American Broadcasting Company Network in Washington D.C. contacts Reverend Ralph Abernathy attempting to continue an interview previously scheduled with Dr. King before his death.

Telegram from MLK and Joseph Lowery to William Anderson

Joseph E. Lowery and Dr. King addressed this telegram to William Anderson asking him to attend a SCLC board meeting regarding the Poor People's Campaign.

The Other America

Dr. King delivered this speech, "The Other America," for the Local 1199 Salute to Freedom program. The speech emphasized the need to address poverty, the Vietnam War, and race relations in America.

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