Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Civil Rights

Associated Archive Content : 864 results

"A Knock At Midnight"

This is a draft of the sermon Dr. King wrote comparing a story from the Bible in St. Luke to the struggle to obtain equality and civil rights.

"Barnett Says JFK Aids Reds"

In a testimony before the Senate Commerce Committee, Mississippi Governor Ross R. Barnett expresses his staunch opposition to President Kennedy's recent civil rights legislation. Governor Barnett goes as far as to associate recent Communist Party activities to the recent "racial agitation, strife, and conflict" emerging from the Civil Rights Movement.

"Black Power" and Coalition Politics

The September 1966 issue of Commentary, a monthly publication of the American Jewish Committee, features Bayard Rustin's article "Black Power and Coalition Politics." The article discusses topics such as black power, the liberal labor civil rights coalition, the strategies of Marcus Garvey, W. E. B. Du Bois, and Booker T. Washington, and A. Philip Randolph's Freedom Budget. Rustin states that although black power is viewed as a "psychological rejection of white supremacy" those advocating for black power are seeking a "new black establishment."

"Dr. King Denounces Write-In Plot"

Contrary to what radio announcements and newspapers advertise, Dr. King urges Negro voters to vote for a presidential candidate that is already on the ballot. He expresses that he is not a candidate and does not want voters to write his name on the ballot.

"Green Power" for Negroes

This SCLC news release documents the success of "a pioneer agreement between the Chicago Freedom Movement and a large grocery chain." As a product of Operation Breadbasket, this development cycled both jobs and capital to keep them organic to the Negro community.

"I, Too" by Jerry Peace

This document displays the poem "I, Too" by Jerry Peace

"In a Word-Now" by MLK

In the attainment of civil rights, Dr. King stresses the importance and urgency of "NOW". He further expounds on the immediate and effective actions that should be exercised by the Federal government to better the society.

"Outrage in Alabama"

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference reprinted the article, "Outrage in Alabama," which was originally printed in The New York Times. The article describes violent acts against civil rights demonstrators discussing the flaws within the legal system.

"Question of Credibility"

In this article, the author highlights and questions the credibility of The Child Development Group, which was created to assist in educating the youth of Mississippi.

"They are Waiting for Godot in Mississippi, Too"

This article, posted in the New York Times, discusses the play, "Waiting for Godot," held by the Free Southern Theatre in Mississippi. The play focuses on racial and social issues dealing with civil rights.

"We're Here Because We're Tired"

Civil rights leader Andrew Young expresses the collective frustration of the African-American community concerning employment discrimination, housing segregation, and the welfare system.

1966 Notes on the War

Dr. King annotates a speech to address his concerns about the war in Vietnam and his duties as a civil rights leader.

24th Annual Blue Ribbon Tea

Woodlawn Community Services Agency issues an invitation to come to the 24th Annual Blue Ribbon Tea where Dr. King will be honored.

A Background Paper for the Delaware Conference on Equal Opportunity in Housing

This paper is intended to catalyze discussion at the Delaware Conference on Equal Opportunity in Housing. By providing facts and analysis pertaining to Wilmington and surrounding areas, the paper is written to help familiarize attendees of the housing situation in Delaware. A key goal is to educate on the racial disparity and deterioration of urban areas. "The national housing objective is to provide decent, safe, and sanitary housing to all people" and this document encourages the execution of developed solutions.

A Call To Action-Lucis Trust

Lucis Trust wrote this "Call To Action" about the vast greivances that were occuring in America, as it related to the issue of race. He identified that African Americans were "condemned to an inferior way of life and excluded as a human being." Trust conveyed that a remedy must be provided for the ongoing injustice. The remedy he proposed is that the attitudes of White Americans needed to change, not only on a non-discriminitory basis, but by creating an atmosphere of inclusivism and goodwill.

A Christian Movement in a Revolutionary Age

In this address, Dr. King fuses the philosophies in the Old and New Testament regarding revolutionary social change. He argues that the most creative and constructive revolutionary force for change is one that combines the Old Testament’s “righteousness and justice that flow down like a mighty stream” with the New Testament’s call to love one’s enemies and bless those who persecute you. He asserts that God has been working actively since the time of Moses for the freedom and perfection of people and society. Dr.

A Chronology of Violence and Intimidation in Mississippi Since 1961

This pamphlet produced by SNCC includes a number of reported violent attacks and intimidation tactics imposed on black Mississippi citizens from January 1, 1961 through February 4, 1964.

A Message from Jail

After being arrested and charged with parading without a license, Dr. King wrote a column from jail. The column shared his and Ralph David Abernathy's decision to serve the jail sentence instead of paying a fine of $178.

A Program of Education in the Philosophy of Non-Violence

The American Foundation on Non-Violence and the SCLC outline a proposal to the Stern Family Fund to educate America on the philosophy of non-violence. The proposed program includes a semi-annual leadership seminar, community leaders conferences, and youth and student workshops.

A Southern Point of View

Eliza Paschall writes this article to express her feelings toward the Georgia legislature's willingness to close down the schools rather than integrate them. Paschall states that "segregation is a disease that infects all parts of a being, human or political." The time for action is now, so that equality can be achieved by all.

A Statement to the South and Nation

This seemingly unexceptional document signifies the birth of the SCLC. Dr. King, Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth and Rev. C. K. Steele assembled a consortium of leaders in Atlanta following the end of the Montgomery Bus Boycott. The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement that addresses the intimidation, discrimination and economic disparity Negroes face in the South. The statement appeals to the federal government to intervene against assaults that block basic civil rights.

A Statement to the South and the Nation

The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement to the nation regarding the unresolved problems of civil rights. The leaders asked for all Negroes, particularly those in the South, to assert their human dignity and to seek justice by rejecting all injustices.

A. Philip Randolph Institute Orientation Agenda

This document outlines the schedule of events during the A. Philip Randolph Institute orientation, an organization focused on racial equality and economic justice.

ABC's Issues and Answers: MLK Interview

Dr. King sat down with Tom Jerriel, Atlanta Bureau Chief, and John Casserly, Washington Correspondent, of the American Broadcasting Company for their program "Issues and Answers." They discussed the civil rights movement, Dr. King's upcoming book, and the U.S. Supreme Court ruling that Dr. King would serve jail time in Birmingham.

Abstract of "The Role of the Behavioral Scientist in the Civil Rights Movement"

This document is an abstract entitled "The Role of the Behavioral Scientist in the Civil Rights Movement," with references to Dr. King's viewpoint.

Accepting the New York City Medallion Draft

Dr. King accepts the New York City Medallion on behalf of all persons, both black and white, involved in the fight for social justice and equality.

Address Before the United Packinghouse Workers of America

At their Thirteenth Constitutional Convention in Minneapolis on May 21, 1962, Dr. King praises the United Packinghouse Workers Union of America for their dedication to civil rights. He states that the civil rights and labor movements share in common a concern for minimum wages, social security, health benefits, decent housing, job security and retirement security. He thanks them for the aid that they have provided and encourages them to continue fighting for equality.

Address by MLK at Golden Anniversary Conference of National Urban League

Dr. King gives an address at the National Urban Leagues's Golden Anniversary Conference in New York City. He speaks on the subject, "The Rising Tide of Racial Consciousness" and discusses the Negroes new sense of "somebodiness." The factors that contribute to this new sense of dignity include a population shift from rural to urban life, rapid educational advance, gradual improvement of economic status, Supreme Court decisions outlawing segregation in the public schools, and awareness that freedom is a part of a world-wide struggle.

Address by MLK at SCLC Ministers Conference

Dr. King addresses those in attendance at the Southern Christian Ministers Conference. He brings words of encouragement to those working diligently for social change in Mississippi. He speaks words of promise that things will change since the Supreme Court has ruled segregation unconstitutional and he gives examples of how things are slowly changing. However, he acknowledges that there is still much work to be done, especially in the South. Dr. King lists actions that must be at the top of everyone's list to be taken care of.

Address by MLK at the Washington, DC Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom

Dr. King gives an address at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D. C. regarding race relations and the struggle for justice and racial equality in America. King discusses the responsibility of the President, Congress, and federal courts to ensure all blacks the have the opportunity and the right to vote. King closes by asserting that everyone must stand firm in faith and act only in love and nonviolence in the fight for these rights.

Pages