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Civil Rights

Associated Archive Content : 864 results

Letter from Alfredo Gomez Gil to MLK

Sheila M. Rogers writes Dr. King in place of her friend Alfredo Gil, who has written a poem in Spanish about the plight of blacks. Rogers has translated the poem and sent it to Dr. King in support of the work he is doing for blacks in the United States.

Letter from Alice Sargent to MLK

Alice Sargent, the Assistant Director of Student Activities at Temple University, inquires what role the students can play in the Civil Rights Movement and sends a sample of one of the students' editorials.

Letter from Allan B. Schmier to MLK

Allan Schmier writes to request a meeting with Dr. King during the Central Conference of Teamsters Convention in Detroit, Michigan. Schmier expresses that he was instructed by the acting chairman to make the request and informs him of the purpose of the meeting.

Letter from Amos O. Holmes to MLK

Amos Holmes, Georgia Field Director of the NAACP, appeals to Dr. King to reject the invitation to take leadership within the Atlanta community. He feels that the city can solve its own problems without the aid of SCLC or Dr. King.

Letter from an Asylum Inmate to MLK Seeking Assistance

Paul Douglas Ware, an untried inmate, requests Dr. King's "understanding, moral support, and possible assistance." Mr. Ware informs Dr. King of detailed information regarding his unjust treatment, his personal life, his present state of mind and most importantly his desire to have a stronger bond with "his own people."

Letter From Andrew Young to Chris Folcker

In this letter, Andrew Young thanks Chris Folcker for his work with the Martin Luther King Fund, the Europe-wide fundraising campaign on behalf of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and Dr. King. Young praises the "tremendous success" of the fund.

Letter from Anonymous Sender to MLK

Dr. King's business partner writes to him from the Midtown Office in New York regarding a column in which they are working on. His partner assures Dr. King that the column will be successful and discusses future plans and events to help fund raise and raise awareness about the it.

Letter from Arlen B. Makler and Alfred J. Lindh to MLK

Mr.Makler and and Mr.Lindh provide details for the Delaware Citizens Housing Conference that Dr. King has contingently agreed to participate in. The overall purpose of the conference is to explore race relations as it pertains to "equal opportunity in housing".

Letter from Arnold Aronson to Cooperating Organizations

Arnold Aronson writes cooperating organizations to ensure that following the March on Washington, the government delivers on the stipulations of the Civil Rights Bill.

Letter from Arthur Jordan to MLK

Arthur Jordan, General Secretary of St. Thomas Young Men's Christian Association in St. Thomas, Ontario, invites Dr. King to speak at a lecture engagement in Canada.

Letter from Arthur Kinoy to MLK

In this letter, Mr. Kinoy informs Dr. King of an article in Rutgers' Law Review, that contains Kinoy's and Bill Kunstler's ideas in civil rights litigation. Kinoy is a law professor at Rutgers The State University.

Letter from Asbury Howard to MLK

Asbury Howard, Vice President of the International Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, informs Dr. King of the harassment and attacks their union has endured for several years. He explains the 1949 indictment of officers from the union on charges of "falsely signing non-Communist affidavits." The case was dormant until government brought the case to trial in 1959 during a strike of 40,000 allied worker and copper miners. Howard cites this as evidence of union busting. He requests Dr. King's commentary and encloses a pamphlet regarding the case.

Letter from Atlantiv Human Resources to MLK

The officers of Atlantic Human Resources invite Dr. King to be the guest of honor and main speaker at their second Annual Meeting.

Letter from B. J. Mason to President Johnson

B. J. Mason deplores how justice is not yet color-blind, at least in Alabama. Mason states that Mr. Boykin's right to "due process of law" is being violated. Edward Boykin admitted guilt to a crime and was sentenced to death, but the trial judge had not ensured that the defendant understood the plea. The U.S. Supreme Court overturned the conviction in Boykin vs. Alabama (1968), citing the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments.

Letter from Barbara Hannagan to MLK

Barbara Hannagan, a student at Gridley Union High School in California, requests information from Dr. King to assist her with a term paper. She expresses her interest in the history of Negroes in America and how that correlates to the current issues of Negroes in "white society."

Letter from Barbara Patterson to MLK

Barbara Patterson writes Dr. King thanking him for the lecture at Grosse Pointe High School in Michigan. She also encloses a letter that was sent to the Michigan Chronicle. The letter pointed out how great of a lecture Dr. King gave which ended in a standing ovation and how it inspired those that listened.

Letter from Barry Gray to Jackie Robinson

Barry Gray, an influential American radio personality, writes Jackie Robinson expressing his disappointment with how he dealt with countering issues. According to Gray, Robinson sent a letter to "distinguished Americans, including his friends" and presumably blackmailed him. Gray discusses his input in the Civil Rights Movement through exposing unequal systems through television and radio.

Letter from Bayard Rustin to MLK

In a statement to the Democratic National Convention, the authors of this document proclaim that they are seeking freedom. They say that immediate change will only come if the elected Chief Executive is committed to giving life to the Constitution. In an attempt to achieve this, they request that all of the Presidential nominees meet the people's delegation.

Letter from Bea Subt to MLK

The author sends Dr. King a letter informing him that she is withdrawing her assistance toward civil rights workers since he has decided to be a politician, military leader and diplomat. She also questions how he can fight for equal rights in a country that's not worth protecting from the communists.

Letter from Beatrice Sutton Rogers to MLK

Beatrice Rogers writes Dr. King expressing her disappointment with his change in his position after he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. She encloses an article from the Washington Post in which critics discuss a speech King gave regarding Vietnam War.

Letter from Ben A. Todd to MLK

Ben A. Todd commends Dr. King for his recent stand against the United States' position in Vietnam, particularly because making such a statement may hurt the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Ben Cashion to MLK

Ben Cashion writes Dr. King sharing some of his observations. Cashion suggests that Dr. King takes his time and get closer to God to provoke efficient change.

Letter from Benjamin E. Smith to MLK

This report highlights a Birmingham conference on the "Ways and Means to Integrate the Deep South" sponsored by the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. This conference included several hundred white and black leaders who sought to integrate the South.

Letter from Benjamin F. Smith to the Editor of Detroit Free Press

In a letter to the editor of the Detroit Free Press, Benjamin Smith criticizes US involvement in Vietnam. He advocates ending the war as 80% of South Vietnamese people want peace, while 67% of Americans "favor a rough war."

Letter from Beresford Hayward to MLK

Beresford Hayward, Planning Consultant of the Department of Education in Puerto Rico, writes Dr. King to inform him of the racial climate in Puerto Rico and its issue of Cuban immigration. Mr. Hayward also presents a comparison between the race issues inflicting Puerto Rico and the United States of America.

Letter From Bernard Lafayette, Jr. to Dennis Brunn

This is a memorandum thanking Mr. Brunn for his letter of support for the labor unions.

Letter From Bessie Burrett to MLK

Bessie Burrett, a NAACP member, writes Dr. King asking for help and explaining the multiple incidences of racial injustice she and her husband have personally witnessed. Burrett describes her husband's injuries, which he obtained as a result of police brutality, and their struggles with unfair treatment in the court system. As a result, her husband is unable to work and they have mounting hospital and court fees to pay, creating a financial hardship for their family.

Letter from Betty White to Coretta Scott King

Betty White, president of The Young Matrons of True Light Baptist Church, invites Mrs. King to be a guest speaker and soloist at an upcoming civil rights program.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK

Civil Rights Division Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall informs Dr. King that the Department of Justice is investigating the assault upon Reverend Paul Chapman.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General, writes Dr. King in response to a telegram sent by the Reverend protesting action be taken by the State of Louisiana against the Southern Conference Educational Fund.

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