Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

University of California, Berkeley

Associated Archive Content : 10 results

Foreword to Neil Sullivan's Book by MLK

Dr. King submits a rough draft of his foreword for a text written by Berkeley County Public Schools Superintendent Neil Sullivan.

How 700 Ibos were Killed by Mistake

This article reports on the massacre of 700 Ibos by federal troops in the Ibo town of Asaba, Nigeria.

Letter from Charles Sellers to MLK

Charles Sellers, a Professor of History at the University of California at Berkeley, writes this letter to Dr. King promoting the Washington Convocation On The National Crisis. He encloses the proposal that he and Cecil Thomas discussed with Mrs. King over the phone. The proposal details the organized effort to marshal public sentiment against current US policy in Vietnam. Five hundred prominent Americans will be invited to the convocation, to be held in Washington, DC.

Letter from Fred Warren to MLK

Fred Warren, Professor of Music at the University of California at Berkeley writes to Dr. King saddened that he will not be able to come to the University. Professor Warren encloses a brochure describing the department's program on Africa, music, and its related arts.

Letter from Thelton Henderson to MLK

Mr. Henderson, of the University of California-Berkeley, invites Dr. King to participate in a Civil Rights Symposium. Notable persons such as Robert Kennedy and Stokley Carmichael previously appeared at the symposium.

Letter from Wolfgang S. Homburger to MLK

Mr. Homburger, Assistant Director for the Institute of Transportation Studies in Berkeley, requests additional information from Dr. King before responding to his appeal for funds.

SCLC Mail Log: January 12, 1968

This mail log lists several contact names and businesses that have had mailing correspondences with the SCLC. It is an example of the manner by which Dr. King and the SCLC handled such a large quantity of incoming mail every day.

SCLC: MLK Still Most Influential Negro According to Studies

The SCLC issues a news release stating that Dr. King is the most influential Negro leader in America. Dr. King, along with other prominent members of the SCLC, was serving a five-day jail sentence in Birmingham, Alabama at the time of the news release.

Telegram from Delmer Brown to MLK

Due to recent student activities at the University of California, Berkeley, Mr. Brown requests Dr. King's involvement in a lecture series devoted to discussing issues concerning civil disobedience.

The Power of Nonviolence

Dr. King delivers this address to the YMCA and YWCA in the Bay Area of California. The power of nonviolence is discussed being intertwined with the knowledge of agape, love and maladjustment. Agape can be defined as an understanding of the redemptive good will of all men. In relation to maladjustment, Dr. King explains how he never intended to adjust himself to segregation and discrimination. Dr. King expounds on how justice strengthened the Montgomery movement. He further explains how the powerful influence of love is a significant factor in the practice of nonviolence.