Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

University of Chicago

Associated Archive Content : 37 results

24th Annual Blue Ribbon Tea

Woodlawn Community Services Agency issues an invitation to come to the 24th Annual Blue Ribbon Tea where Dr. King will be honored.

Bibliography Compiled by MLK

This handwritten bibliography documents texts that discuss theology.

CIC Press Release: Hilliard to Head Catholic Testimonial for MLK

The Catholic Interracial Council releases a statement announcing Raymond M. Hilliard as the Chairman of the 1964 John F. Kennedy Award Dinner. During the event, Dr. King will be honored for his leadership and dedication to the civil rights struggle. Hilliard, whom President Johnson named to the National Citizens Committee for Community Relations to advise on the implementation of civil rights legislation, called Dr. King's work "inspired and truly Christian" and said that the CIC was honored to celebrate him.

Dexter Avenue Baptist Church Annual Report, 1955-1956

This report contains vital information concerning the organizational structure, services, and members of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. Dr. King provides a heartfelt address to the Montgomery, AL congregation as he seeks to extend the church's influence throughout the community amidst his growing involvement in the Civil Rights Movement.

Fifty-five Facts about Morehouse

This pamphlet discusses fifty-five important facts about Morehouse College and its distinguished alumni.

Housing Report to the SCLC Board of Directors

Members of the SCLC Board of Directors were the recipients of this detailed report outlining solutions to end the slum crisis in the North.

Jesse Jackson and the Civil Rights Movement

This article details Jesse Jackson's involvement with the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from A.C. Spectorsky to MLK

Editorial Director, A.C. Spectorsky, requests comments from Dr. King regarding an interview with Senator Charles Percy from the April issue of PLAYBOY Magazine. The Illinois Republican
discusses a range of subjects including American military presence in Vietnam, President Lyndon B. Johnson's leadership style, and Negro-white relations.

Letter from Angie Elizabeth Shelton to MLK

Mrs. Shelton expresses her gratitude to Dr. King for renewing her faith. After reading one of Dr. King's books, she states that she felt herself beginning to believe. Mrs. Shelton has decided to buy and study "Civil Disobedience" thanks to Dr. King.

Letter from Archie Crouch to MLK

Archie R. Crouch, of the Office for Communications, sends a personal letter to Dr. King using the United Presbyterian Church letterhead. He expresses his support for Dr. King's leadership against the Vietnam War and states that he meets many people that stand in opposition to the war. Crouch encloses recent issues of the publications New and Motive, which highlight the anti-war efforts taking place in the Presbyterian Church.

Letter from Charles Daly to Dr. King

Charles Daly is attaching an article from the 1966 issue of the University of Chicago Magazine that he thought would be of interest to Dr. King.

Letter From Charles L. Sanders to MLK

In this letter, Sanders recommends William Rutherford to Dr. King for a position with SCLC.

Letter from Dan C. Lortie to MLK

Professor Dan Lortie of the University of Chicago invites Dr. King to speak at the Colver-Rosenberger Lecture Series.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Robert Goldwin

Dora McDonald informs Dr. Robert A. Goldwin the four essays on "100 Years of Emancipation" have been received and placed on Dr. King's desk for him to read upon his return from out of town.

Letter from Dr. Joseph R. Swartwout to MLK

Dr. Joseph R. Swartwout invites Dr. King to eat lunch at the Chicago University faculty club.

Letter From E. Spencer Parsons to MLK

E. Spencer Parsons, Dean of the Rockefeller Memorial Chapel at the University of Chicago, invites Dr. King to preach at a university religious service. He also commends him for the leadership he has provided Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam.

Letter from Fitzhugh Mullan to MLK

Fitzhugh Mullan, the Chairman of the Student Health Organization of Chicago, asks Dr. King to be an advisor to the organization. Nationwide, the student health movement has worked in the ghettos of Los Angeles, with California migrant farmworkers, and in three Southern states.

Letter from J. R. Coan to Alumni of Turner Theological Seminary

Mr. Coan, acting director of Turner Theological Seminary at the Interdenominational Theological Center, issued this correspondence to all of Turner Theological Seminary's Alumni. The letter announces the details and record of minutes for the Seminary's Third Annual Founders' Day Convocation.

Letter from Larry T. Wimmer to MLK

Larry T. Wimmer, Assistant Professor at Brigham Young University, writes Dr. King seeking information regarding his views on communism and the Civil Rights Movement. He also asks if it is possible to obtain any films regarding the Civil Rights Movement and Dr. King's leadership.

Letter from Rev. Hazel E. Foster to MLK

Reverend Hazel Foster writes to Dr. King in support of his continuous struggle. He talks about memorizing the Sermon on the Mount and the importance to him and leaders like Gandhi. He offers words of encouragement and prays that Dr. King may find peace during these hard times.

Letter from Robert A. Goldwin to MLK

Robert A. Goldwin informs Dr. King that he is enclosing four essays on "100 Years of Emancipation." Goldwin hopes Dr. King will enjoy reading the essays.

Letter from William S. Minor to MLK

William Minor, the Director of The Foundation for Creative Philosophy, invites Dr. King to speak at The Society for Creative Ethics meeting in New York.

Mars Lecture Series

This 1958 program features Dr. King as guest lecturer for the Mars Lectures at Northwestern University.

Mission Development Report

This report outlines the structure and development of the North Carolina Leadership Training Project.

MLK Address at the University of Chicago

Dr. King delivers this speech at the University of Chicago on January 27, 1966. He expounds upon the struggles of the Negro family in America, explaining the social and economic challenges the Negro faces along with the affects of slavery.

MLK Address Regarding the Negro Family

In this address, Dr. King discusses the struggles of the Negro family. He states that the Negro family's life determines the individuals' capacity to love. Dr. King also discusses how American slavery has impacted the Negro family.

MLK Speaks on the African American Family

Dr. King speaks to an assembly in Chicago, Illinois about the history and dynamics of the African American family in the United States.

News Release from Congressman John Conyers Jr.

Congressman John Conyers, Jr. requests that a conference be held including Negro elected officials to support his thirty billion dollar bill to help the nation's ghettos.

Operation Breadbasket Food Store Agreement

Economic conditions begin to change as High-Low Foods and the ministers of Operation Breadbasket team up to provide better opportunities for African Americans.

Pittsburgh Courier: Mays

Dr. Benjamin E. Mays mourns the recent deaths of Charles Drew and Carter Woodson. Both were highly acclaimed individuals, not only because of their race but also in their areas of study. Drew developed large-scale blood banks during WWI and Woodson cultivated the idea of Black History Month.

Pages