Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Political Participation

Associated Archive Content : 308 results

Letter from MLK to Daniel K. Inouye

Dr. King commends Hawaiian Senator Daniel K. Inouye for his support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to Frank Carlson

Dr. King writes Kansas Senator Frank Carlson to applaud his vote for the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to J. Howard Edmondson

Dr. King writes Oklahoma Senator James Howard Edmondson to express appreciation for his support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to Keith Black

Dr. King thanks Keith Black and the Valley Community Presbyterian Church for their contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, stating the progress and upcoming goals of the organization.

Letter from MLK to Laura R. Daly

Dr. King apologizes to Laura Daly for his delayed response and expresses his appreciation for her financial contribution. He states that the "new democracy" that has emerged in the south would not be possible without the moral and financial support from contributors such as Miss Daly. He discusses how there is still work to accomplish and the SCLC will continue their efforts in the freedom struggle.

Letter from MLK to Margo

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Margo for her inquiry about summer work with the SCLC and suggests she contact Hosea Williams about the SCOPE project for the following summer.

Letter from MLK to Maurine B. Neuberger

Dr. King writes Oregon Senator Maurine B. Neuberger to express gratitude for her support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to Miss R. Berkenvelder

Dr. King writes to Miss Berkenvelder, agreeing that silent and non-active individuals maintained the severity of injustices. He further elaborates on his prayer that warriors will form who are committed to nonviolence and world peace.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Theodore A. Dilday

Dr. King writes Mrs. Dilday of Riverside Baptist Church to express his appreciation for her two contributions to the SCLC. He explains the current works of the SCLC in Chicago and Alabama and stresses the importance of supporters like her.

Letter from MLK to Otis Warren

Dr. King acknowledges the contribution made by Otis Warren of Baltimore, Maryland to the SCLC. He highlights new initiatives that the SCLC will undertake to boost Negro political participation in Southern states and a project to tackle the ghettos of Northern cities. Dr. King humbly notes that these projects could not move forward without the generosity of individuals like Warren.

Letter from MLK to Senator Daniel Brewster

Dr. King commends Senator Daniel Brewster for his support of the 1964 Civil Rights Act.

Letter from MLK to Senator Everett McKinley Dirksen

Dr. King thanks Senate Minority leader Senator Everett McKinley Dirksen (R-Illinois) for his role in helping to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Dirksen was one of a handful of Republican Senators that helped break a southern Democratic filibuster designed to prevent the passing of this legislation.

Letter from MLK to Senator Hiram L. Fong

Dr. King thanks Hawaii Republican Senator Hiram Fong for his role in the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Fong was the first Asian American and Chinese American to become a US Senator.

Letter from MLK to Senator J. Glenn Bealll

Dr. King thanks Senator J. Glenn Beall for supporting the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to The Honorable J. Caleb Boggs

Dr. King writes Senator James Caleb Boggs of Delaware to commend his role in "forging the bi-partisan unity" that made possible the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to The Honorable John Sherman Cooper

Dr. King writes Kentucky Senator John Sherman Cooper to commend his role in facilitating the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to The Honorable Joseph S. Clark

Dr. King writes Senator Joseph S. Clark of Pennsylvania to commend his support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to Transportation Workers Union President Matthew Guinan

Dr. King thanks newly elected Transport Workers Union President Matthew Guinan for his contribution that will aid SCLC in their efforts. However, the contribution was made out to Dr. King, which causes him to inform Mr. Guinan to make the check payable to the SCLC. Dr. King congratulates Guinan on his recent position and wishes him much success.

Letter from MLK to Vice President Nixon

Dr. King thanks Vice President Richard Nixon for an earlier meeting. He supports the limited Civil Rights Bill (the Civil Rights Act of 1957) finally passed by the Senate and hopes the President will not veto it. He believes that a sustained mass movement is needed for the bill to be effective and is calling for a “Crusade for Citizenship” in the South to get at least 2 million Negroes registered to vote for the 1960 elections. King lauds the Vice President for his vigorous efforts in support of the Civil Rights Bill.

Letter from MLK to Wesley A. Hotchkiss

Dr. King thanks Dr. Wesley A. Hotchkiss from the United Church of Christ for his generous contribution of $11,000 to the SCLC. King includes a list of how they money will be spent to assist with voter registration.

Letter from Mrs. Robert Hall to MLK

Mrs. Hall suggests a letter writing campaign for young people as a more effective and less intimidating means of demonstrating than petitions and marches.

Letter from Myles Horton to Friends of Highlander

Myles Horton, the co-founder of the Highlander Research and Education Center, explains that he has been working on a program for the Appalachian area. He also mentions that the Center sponsors voter registration, political education programs and a series of workshops to help Negro candidates run for local and state offices.

Letter from New York Third Grader Debbie Bass to MLK

Third grade student Debbie Bass chose Dr. King for her writing assignment. Bass feels that Dr. King was the right individual chosen to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. She also conveys her frustration towards Alabama Governor George Wallace for not allowing Negroes to vote.

Letter from Ohio University at Portsmouth to MLK Regarding Choice '68

The Public Affairs Forum of Ohio University at Portsmouth requests material from Dr. King for the university's participation in Time magazine's "Choice '68," a nationwide mock presidential election.

Letter from Pauline Wren to MLK

Pauline Wren criticizes Dr. King for his endorsement of Adam Clayton Powell and asks for the immediate return of some "work" that was entrusted to Dr. King as a "minister and gentleman."

Letter from Ralph Turnidge to MLK

The Reverend Ralph Turnidge, General Secretary of the Washington-Northern Idaho Council of Churches, invites Dr. King to be the featured leader at a conference on the Church and Human Rights.

Letter from Representative Carl Perkins to MLK

Congressman Carl Perkins informs Dr. King that he supports fighting against the McCulloch Amendment to the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Letter from Representative Charles Longstreet Weltner to MLK

Representative Weltner disagrees with Dr. King's assessment that Weltner's decision to seat the regular Mississippi delegation "was a vote for organized violence, murder, and oppression." Weltner also reminds Dr. King that he voted for the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Richard Beal to MLK

Mr. Beal informs Dr. King that he believes the best way for African Americans to gain the support of Caucasian Americans is for them to earn their respect.

Letter from Richard Nixon to MLK

Vice President Nixon writes to Dr. King concerning the efficiency and effectiveness of the Civil Rights Bill. He expresses his gratitude for a previous correspondence from Dr. King and ensures his continued advocacy of civil rights legislation.

Pages