Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Segregation - Law and Legislation

Associated Archive Content : 480 results

Letter from E. Cowles Andrus to MLK

Mrs. Cowles Andrus commends Dr. King a speech made in Washington. Having donated in the past, Mrs. Cowley Andrus was so impressed and inspired by the speech that she increased her contribution with hope it would be of great benefit.

Letter from Esther M. Jackson to McGeorge Bundy

Esther Jackson, a professor at Shaw University, writes George Bundy of the Ford Foundation expressing his dismay in the support of a segregated theatre. Jackson also expresses his disappointment in Dr. King and Roy Wilkins for not recognizing the discrimination taking place in form of cultural separatism.

Letter from Fernando DeEquidazu to MLK

Students from Spain write Dr. King, showing their appreciation for his leadership to the Civil Rights Movement, and asks if Dr. King can supply them with articles for magazines in Spain.

Letter from Frances L. Lucas to MLK

Frances L. Lucas writes Dr. King concerning the actions taken to end segregation in a community in Albany, Georgia. Lucas also apologizes for not responding to Dr. Kings formal letter.

Letter from Frank S. Gotshall to MLK

Frank S. Gotshall compliments Dr. King's as a "fine champion," but he asserts that the problem of race relations in America is worsening. To prevent race mixing, Gotshall proposes that each race be given its own area in which it can live.

Letter from Harold W. Buchholz to MLK

Harold W. Buchholz, a financial patron, provides Dr. King with tips to appeal to more Americans regarding his programs to provide equality for Negroes.

Letter from Harry G. Boyte to Leon R. Martin

SCLC Director of Research and Information Harry Boyte communicates with Leon Martin to thank him for the thoughtful words made in response to Dr. King's article in "The New Leader." Boyte tells Martin that Negroes in America are at a place where they will no longer be forced to wait for equality. Boyte asserts that only the complete participation of Negroes in every part of life in America will "suffice at this juncture in history."

Letter from High School Student Jeanne Adams to MLK

Joanne Adams, a student from Central High School, writes Dr. King to voice her support for what he is doing for negro citizens in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from J. P. Brookshire to MLK

J. P. Brookshire supports Dr. King's desire for equality and justice, but is critical of the methods by which Dr. King uses to obtain these goals. He also criticizes Dr. King's stand on the conflict in Vietnam and the draft.

Letter from James A. Dombrowski Regarding S.C.E.F. Contribution

In this document, James A. Dombrowski, the Executive Director of the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. requests a $10.00 contribution.

Letter from James Hamilton and Frank Pohlhaus

James Hamilton and Francis Pohlhaus offer the Leadership Conference Executive Committee a list of recommendations on school desegregation. They also provide information on reasons why goals toward equal education have not been progressing as needed.

Letter from James M. Nielsen to MLK

James M. Nielson congratulates Dr. King on receiving Time Magazine's Man-of-the-Year Award. Mr. Nielson invites Dr. King to the Sixth Annual Trade Fair sponsored by the Anacortes Jaycees.

Letter from Jimmie Johnson to MLK

Jimmie Johnson writes to Dr. King to say that while he is a Negro, he does not believe in integration. Johnson does not think there will ever be enough jobs in America for Negroes, and therefore argues for segregation. He asks Dr. King to share this view in his upcoming meeting with President Johnson.

Letter from John B. Morris to Alfred Hardman

The Executive Director of the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity writes the Lovett School Board of Trustees regarding the decision not to accept Negroes. Reverend John Morris informs Reverend Alfred Hardman that the church does not agree with the decision and will protest it. Dr. King's son, Martin Luther King III was one of the students not admitted into the school.

Letter from John H. Herriford to MLK

John Herriford, a student at the University of Minnesota, offers Dr. King advice on how to improve sit-in demonstrations.

Letter from Joyce Armstrong to MLK

Joyce Armstrong of Detroit, Michigan expresses concern regarding segregation and equality in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Judy Grey to MLK

Judy Grey, a student at Tennessee Polytechnic Institute, informs Dr. King of a paper she is required to complete regarding an issue in the South and requests that he provide any information concerning the movement in the South.

Letter from L. Howard Bennett to MLK

L. Howard Bennett writes Dr. King and encloses statistical information regarding African American involvement in the Vietnam War.

Letter from L. K. Jackson to MLK

Reverend L. K. Jackson commends Dr. King on his ongoing efforts in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from L. K. Jackson to MLK

Rev. Jackson updates Dr. King on his recent activities, how hard he has been fighting for equality for all Americans, and regrets to inform him that he is ill.

Letter from Marie L. Jones Regarding Reverend Ashton Jones

Mary L. Jones sent out this letter reporting on the plight of her husband, Reverend Ashton Jones, who was arrested in July of 1963 for attempting to lead an interracial student group into a service at the segregated First Baptist Church of Atlanta. Reverend Jones was sentenced to a year in the Georgia state prison and six months of hard labor for the crime of "disturbing a worship service." Mrs. Jones encourages readers of her letter to heed the advice of British social critic Bertrand Russell, by writing an "avalanche of letters" to those responsible.

Letter from Marilyn Coulter to MLK

Marilyn Coulter asks Dr. King to provide information for her research paper entitled "Segregation."

Letter from Marvin Caplan of Leadership Conference on Civil Rights

In a letter to the heads of various organizations, Marvin Caplan encloses information regarding the Crime Control Bill that was sent to all members of the State Judiciary Committee. The enclosure is entitled "A New Threat to School Desegregation."

Letter from Mary Bull to MLK

Mary Bull writes Dr. King expressing her sentiments towards the concept of racial separatism, and how it causes detriment to the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Mary E. Bull to MLK

Mary Bull asks Dr. King to reply to an earlier letter, of which she encloses a copy. Mrs. Bull asserts that the Civil Rights Movement made excellent progress up to 1966, but afterwards seemed divided. She wants to know the reasons for this division and asks Dr. King to bring back the supporters who have strayed.

Letter from Mary Grooms to Coretta Scott King

Mrs. Mary H. Grooms writes Mrs. Coretta Scott King expressing her support for Dr. King and the upcoming March on Washington. She also requests that Dr. King reach out to leaders in the North who have sought to emulate his methods.

Letter from Max Goldberg to MLK

Max Goldberg asserts that the interview conducted with Dr. King a year ago serves relevance for the current progression attempts for the American Negro. Mr. Goldberg is attempting to produce copies of the interview and distribute them to various cities.

Letter from MLK to Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity

Dr. King thanks Mr. T. W. Cole and the members of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. for supporting the SCLC financially and morally. Dr. King is also a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

Letter from MLK to Beatrice Rosselll

Dr. King takes an opportunity to express gratitude for Beatrice Rossell's support to the civil rights movement. He addresses her inquiry regarding his activities with the Highlander Folk School and possible Communist ties. Rossell received a picture of Dr. King at Highlander and the caption addressed him as a Communist.

Letter from MLK to Bernard Goldstein

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Bernard Goldstein for her contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains the importance of her contribution and how it helps in their fight for equality.

Pages