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United States Supreme Court

Associated Archive Content : 218 results

Letter from Vince Hartke to MLK

Democratic Indiana Senator Vance Hartke informs Dr. King that the Senate might not vote on the issue of the Voting Rights Bill due to a recent decision concerning the constitutionality of a poll tax.

Letter from William W. Boyer to MLK

This Letter from William W. Boyer, Chairman of the Convocations Committee, to Dr. King informs Dr. King the transcription of his "Future of Integration" speech to the Kansas State University academic community has arrived. A copy of the transcription will be published in Issues 1968.
This enclosed transcription of his speech addresses many varied issues affecting American society.

Levels of Love

Dr. King describes five levels of love, from lowest to highest: utilitarian love, friendship, romantic love, humanitarian love, and agape. The last he refers to as Christian love, the love of God operating in the human heart. The first four, he states, are love for one’s own sake. The fifth is love for another person for their sake. This sermon was delivered by Dr. King on May 21, 1967 at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia.

Love in Action

Dr. King expounds on the love of God by referencing a verse from the Bible in the Book of Luke. The verse states, "Then said Jesus, Father, forgive them; for they know not what they do." Dr. King notes the truth of this verse is also revealed in race relation of today.

Manuscript by MLK dated 2/3/62 entitled "People in Action"

In this 1962 draft for his column in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King emphasizes that school desegregation and the Rosa Parks incident are crucial turning points in the Civil Rights Movement.

May 17 -- 11 Years Later

Dr. King discusses the eleven years since the Supreme Court ruled that segregated schools were not constitutional in Brown v. Board of Education. He explains that it was not until the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that people began to understand the harms of segregation.

Memo from Harry Boyte to MLK

Mr. Boyte asks Dr. King to review the document "ACTION FOR DEMOCRACY." He also attaches two tables for his review.

Memo on Strategy of the Integration Movement

An anonymous writer pens a comprehensive strategy that focuses on achieving racial integration. Within the text of the document, the writer identifies various political, social and economical developments that are needed in order to end racially stemmed inequalities for African Americans.

Memorandum Regarding Civil Rights Complaints

Robert Greene, John Griffin and Ralph Scott make a claim against the state of New York, asserting that they were denied their civil rights and treated unjustly.

MLK Address - The Association of The Bar of the City of New York

Dr. King gives an address to the Association of The Bar of the City of New York at the Hilton Hotel in New York. He praises lawyers for using their knowledge to aid the Civil Rights Movement. He states that Negro lawyers bring wisdom and a determination to win to the courtroom. Dr. King also defines an unjust law as a law that is "out of harmony with moral law of the universe."

MLK Address at NAACP 53rd Convention

Dr. King delivered this address to the NAACP's 53rd Annual Convention held in Morehouse College's gymnasium in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King argues that it is imperative to debunk the perceived myths concerning segregation and discrimination in order to foster a society free of racial inequalities.

MLK Address at Park Sheraton Hotel

Dr. King gives an address commemorating the one hundredth anniversary of the passage of the Emancipation Proclamation. In the celebratory speech, he calls all Americans to take action in applying the principles of the Emancipation Proclamation to society. Dr. King states that the commands of the Proclamation have fallen short in practice and that it will take a cumulative effort from every citizen to undo this process.

MLK Address at the National Biennial Convention

Dr. King delivers this speech at the National Biennial Convention of the American Jewish Congress. The convention took place May 1, 1958 in Miami Beach, Florida. Dr. King discusses how the Jewish and Negro communities are unified by the escape of bondage. They share a common fight against the deadly enemies of oppression. He continues on to discuss the things that need to be done in order for African Americans to reach great potential along with the importance of fighting for and obtaining democracy.

MLK Announces The Jail Sentences Stemming from the 1963 Birmingham Demonstrations

Dr. King makes this statement regarding the arrest of himself and other leaders of the 1963 Birmingham struggle. The Supreme Court in 1967 ruled that these leaders unjustly broke the city wide injunction banning demonstrations. Dr. King urges the nation, "Take heed. Do not allow the Bill of Rights to become a prisoner of war."

MLK Draft Text Retrieved by T.D. Johnston

The document is a dedication from T. D. Johnston of Huntsville, Alabama to the King Center. Mr. Johnston acknowledges being on an Eastern Airline plane with Dr. King in 1961, where he noticed that Dr. King tossed a speech text that he found. He decided to hold on to the document for preservation and donated it to the King Center. Martin Luther King, III received the document on behalf of the King Center.

MLK Flyer: "Integrated Bus Suggestions"

In this document, Dr. King and the Reverend W.J. Powell list under "The Montgomery Improvement Association" guidelines to mitigate potential conflicts in the transition to integrated buses. The principle of nonviolence is present throughout the document.

MLK on the Seating of Julian Bond

Georgia State Legislature has refused to seat Representative-Elect Julian Bond. Dr. King expresses his disdain for the social injustice. His plan of action is to combat this prejudice by rallying members of the white and black community to engage in protest.

MLK Postcard - American Negro Emancipation Centennial

The American Negro Emancipation Centennial issued this 1964 postcard containing Dr. King's brief biography. The postcard was designed to be used as a study guide in Negro history.

MLK Remarks at The World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Dr. King addresses the 25th anniversary of the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund. Dr. King delivers remarks honoring the work of the Fund in combating the system of racial segregation and striving for human rights. He advocates the need for current civil rights legislation, but finds congressional hesitation frustrating and problematic. Referencing the 1964 Civil Right's Act, King is convinced that if the bill is not passed, the "nation will drift toward its moral and political doom."

MLK Speaks Before the NAACP at Winston-Salem

This program for the Winston-Salem branch of the NAACP highlights Dr. King as the guest speaker.

MLK Speech at NAACP Sponsored Rally for Civil Rights

Dr. King gives a speech in which he addresses a myriad of issues on the subject of civil rights.

MLK Speech at SCLC Staff Retreat

Dr. King addresses the staff of the SCLC at a retreat in Frogmore, South Carolina. He divides his speech into three parts: "whence we have come, where we have come, and where do we go from here." Dr. King thoroughly discusses his thoughts on Communism, the practice of nonviolence, the belief that racism is an "ontological affirmation,"and the weaknesses of Black Power.

MLK Speech: Acceptance of Spingarn Medal

Dr. King addresses the attendees at the NAACP 48th Annual Convention in Detroit, Michigan. He acknowledges the noble men and women of the Montgomery Bus Boycott Movement, for which his leadership earned him this award. Dr. King also discusses the ongoing struggle for civil rights and the nonviolent approach needed for the American Negro to win freedom and justice.

MLK Statement Regarding an Attack on the First Amendment

Dr. King addresses violations of First Amendment Rights in this statement regarding the events at Birmingham, Alabama in 1963.

MLK Statement Regarding Desegregation

Dr. King discusses the end of the Old South and segregation. He lists urbanization, federal intervention and the unrest of Negroes as key ingredients in breaking down the old system.

MLK's 'People to People' Column on Education

This article by Dr. King appeared in the New York Amsterdam News. He discusses the segregation of schools and how it is harming African American children and their opportunities.

MLK's Address at the Pilgrimage for Democracy

Dr. King discusses the issues of segregation, poverty and discrimination within the City of Atlanta, in this 1963 speech at the Pilgrimage for Democracy. He explains that although Atlanta was thought to be a place of "racial harmony," the reality of glaring discrimination in Atlanta's schools, restaurants, and housing has left the local Negro community "tired," and hungry for change.

MLK's Address to Syracuse University

Dr. King, in a public speech at Howard University, talks about numerous factors that affect education in America.

MLK's Crawfordville, Georgia Speech

Dr. King rallies the people to keep pushing forward with nonviolent actions to gain freedom and dignity as human beings.

MLK's Gadsden, Alabama Rally Speech

This transcript of Dr. King's address during the Gadsden, Alabama Rally addresses the ills of segregation in the South. He professes that the accusation of civil rights demonstrations being responsible for creating tension is equivalent to blaming the act of robbery on the wealth of man.

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