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Vietnam War / Vietnamese Conflict

Associated Archive Content : 246 results

Letter from Cornell E. Talley to MLK

Cornell E. Talley, Pastor of New Light Baptist Church, tells Dr. King that his church is withdrawing their pledge of $100 per month to the SCLC. Talley felt as if Dr. King was no longer fighting for civil rights, and that his leadership of anti-war demonstrations was counterproductive.

Letter from David Kairys to MLK and SCLC

Mr. Kairys writes Dr. King to express his support of Dr. King's stand against the Vietnam War as well as Dr. King's approach to civil rights issues.

Letter from Donald Keys to MLK

Donald F. Keys writes to Dr. King about Dr. King's invitation to speak at a planned Washington Mobilization on Vietnam. Keys also tells Dr. King that he may have to go to Africa at the time of the meeting, and requests that Mrs. King deliver his address in his absence.

Letter from Dr. Alex Hershaft to MLK

Dr. Alex Hershaft writes to Dr. King to tell him he is happy to make a donation now that Dr. King has aligned himself against the war in Vietnam. Rather than having to choose between donating to civil rights or anti-war causes, Dr. Hershaft can donate to Dr. King and accomplish both.

Letter From E. Spencer Parsons to MLK

E. Spencer Parsons, Dean of the Rockefeller Memorial Chapel at the University of Chicago, invites Dr. King to preach at a university religious service. He also commends him for the leadership he has provided Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam.

Letter from Edward Taylor to MLK

Staff Sergeant Edward Taylor, United States Army, requests Dr. King's assistance or advice in appealing his bar to reenlistment and court martial.

Letter from Edward Taylor to MLK

Edward Taylor, an African American soldier in Vietnam, requests Dr. King's aid in a military justice matter.

Letter from Edward Thacker to MLK

Edward Thacker, former State Commander of the Veterans of Foreign Wars for Arkansas, expresses his disagreement with Dr. King's views on the Vietnam War. Thacker also contends that the eradication of poverty is an unrealistic goal.

Letter from Edwin Allaire to MLK

The writer, who identifies himself as a professor at the University of Michigan, encourages Dr. King to announce his candidacy for the Presidency.

Letter from Eleanor Bell Barnard to MLK

Eleanor Bell Barnard expresses her appreciation for Dr. King's position on Vietnam and Civil Rights. Ms. Barnard also describes to Dr. King how his work is motivation to those who are unemployed.

Letter from Elisabeth Leonard to MLK

Elisabeth Leonard expresses her support and gratitude for Dr. King's work, which includes his speeches about the Vietnam War as well as an upcoming speech on the Spring Mobilization.

Letter from Ellen Tamaki to MLK

Ellen M. Tamaki, from Berkeley, California, has a list of questions for Dr. King that center on accusations of "merg[ing] the peace movement with the civil rights struggle." The writer references Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War and asks about the motivation for his opinions.

Letter from Eric Weinburger to MLK

Mr. Eric Weinburger requests the assistance of Dr. King in publicizing the Committee for Nonviolent Action's tax refusal campaign.

Letter from Ernst Ketel to MLK

Ernst Ketel writes Dr. King expressing disgust with current political parties and ideals. He requests that Dr. King consider running for political office, preferably president.

Letter from Eugene Patterson to MLK

Eugene Patterson thanks Dr. King for the congratulatory letter in which Dr. King clarified his position on Vietnam. Patterson also asks Dr. King to suggest a time for them to meet to discuss the Civil Rights Movement and Vietnam.

Letter from Everett C. McKeage to MLK

Mr. McKeage writes to Dr. King expressing his satisfaction and appreciation for his position on Vietnam relations. He encloses a monetary donation to assist Dr. King's work.

Letter from Frank R. Romano to MLK

Frank R. Romano expresses his support for Dr. Martin Luther King Jr by explaining his run as a peace candidate in the 1966 primary.

Letter from Genevieve Fay to MLK

This letter from Mrs. Fay gives her appreciation to Dr. King for his efforts. She expresses her deep concern for the motives of the political figures in Washington, D.C., and the importance of Dr. King's presence to counter the imbalance.

Letter from George Johnson to MLK

George Johnson offers donating the services of his advertising agency to Dr. King as support for the Viet Nam [sic] war referendum in Missouri.

Letter from George W. Baker to MLK

George W. Baker encloses a check in support of Dr. King and his ongoing work towards peace in Vietnam.

Letter from Gerold Newmark to MLK

In this letter, Mr. Newmark requests a copy of the speech Dr. King delivered in New York City on Vietnam.

Letter from Glenn Smiley to MLK

The Fellowship of Reconciliation asks Dr. King for assistance in obtaining a license to ship medical aid to North and South Vietnam.

Letter from Harry Daniels to MLK

Harry Daniels stresses the urgency of an American withdrawal from Asia and proposes appointing Dr. King as special ambassador to North Vietnam.

Letter from Helen Marrow to MLK

Mrs. Marrow thanks Dr. King for his leadership and position on the Vietnam War. She also encloses a special composition dedicated to Dr. King for his commitment to peace.

Letter from Henry Darby to Edward Brooke

Henry Darby, a student at Atlanta University asks for information about Dr. King's involvement in the Vietnam War.

Letter from Henry S. Huntington Expressing Concerned About Vietnam

Huntington expresses deep concern regarding the Vietnam War. Huntington believes that humor and ridicule is a weapon against the war that is being used too little. He urges Dr. King and his supporters to each send a message to the president, and also write a letter to the local paper asking peace-lovers to state a message ridiculing President Johnson. In conclusion, Huntington hopes to gain other peace organizations to join in the Ridicule For Johnson Movement.

Letter from International Institute for Peace to MLK

O. P. Paliwal and Yves Choliere, from the World Council of Peace, invite Dr. King to speak at a session in Geneva about the well being of Vietnam.

Letter from J. Depre to MLK

The author addresses his concern to Dr. King regarding indications of an invasion of China by the US Military.

Letter from J. P. Brookshire to MLK

Mr. Brookshire explains to Dr. King the application of the U.S. Constitution to underprivileged groups and urges him to avoid matters of war and peace.

Letter from J. Purcell to MLK

A "Poor White Texan" sends Dr. King a letter of support and encourages him to run for President. The writer explains that it is not until the people achieve racial unity that the world will be at peace.

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