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Vietnam War / Vietnamese Conflict

Associated Archive Content : 246 results

Letter from J. V. Jones to MLK

J.V. Jones questions whether Dr. King's position on the Vietnam war is helping the black race because he believes otherwise. Jones also encloses a Walter Winchell article from the Los Angeles Harold Examiner.

Letter from Jack Hopkins to Senator Morse

In a letter to Senator Wayne L. Morse, Jack Hopkins addresses his personal issues with the United States. He begins with a discussion of the conflict in Vietnam, and believes the United States is handling it poorly. He then expresses his feelings on the Jewish race and the establishment of a Jewish nation. He concludes his letter saying that the United States never tries to solve problems; rather it creates the foundation for a new war.

Letter from Jack Krieger to MLK

Jack Krieger requests a reprint of Dr. King's speech delivered at the Riverdale Church in New York on the topics of peace and the Vietnam War.

Letter from James Allen to MLK

James Allen expresses his opinion of the United States' involvement in Vietnam.

Letter from Jeffery Goldberg to MLK

In this letter, Jeffery Goldberg comments on the Vietnam War and requests a copy of Dr. King's speech to Church Laymen.

Letter from John Maguire to Dora McDonald

Mr. Maguire writes Ms. McDonald requesting a full text copy of Dr. King's speech on "Viet Nam" in New York.

Letter from John Sayre to MLK

Mr. Sayre of the International Fellowship of Reconciliation thanks Dr. King for the autographed copy of "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Letter from Julius Avery to MLK Regarding Vietnam

In this letter Julius H. Avery writes MLK to urge him to reconsider his position on the Vietnam war. Avery expresses his support for world peace but stresses that Dr. King's remarks are volatile and do not warrant "opening the flood gates to Communism."

Letter from K. Emmons to MLK

K. Emmons proposes to Dr. King that Christians should put God and Jesus above "fumbling politicians." K. Emmons also comments on soldiers in Vietnam.

Letter from Kennon Brownlee to MLK

Kennon R. Brownlee, a social science major at Bishop College, asks Dr. King for his opinion concerning the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Kent Bach to MLK

In this letter Kent Bach requests Dr. King's endorsement of "Lights On For Peace." Kent Bach plans to run a full-page ad in the New York Times expressing his objection to America's military involvement in Vietnam.

Letter from Lawrence G. Holt to MLK Regarding Civil Rights

In this Letter, Lawrence Holt writes to Dr. King urging him to limit his public comments to those regarding civil rights and not the war in Vietnam. Holt states, "You are in a unique position to help the civil rights movement which you are endangering by your public comments on the war."

Letter from Leland Stewart to MLK

Leland Stewart, of the Conference on Science and Religion, writes to Dr. King to offer support in the movement to end the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Leonard Newell to MLK

Leonard A. Newell writes to Dr. King to ask for his opinion about the pursuit of a consumer strike to protest the War in Vietnam.

Letter from Lillian M. Snyder to the Editor

Lillian Snyder sends a letter to the editor of Sunpapers sharing her views on U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War.

Letter from M. Steven Lubet to MLK

M. Steven Lubet is requesting the presence of Mr. and Mrs. King at the Vietnam teach-in. The teach-in is being sponsored by the Northwestern chapter of Students for a Democratic Society and its purpose is to increase people's understanding of the events occuring in Vietnam.

Letter from Marjorie Heins to MLK and Dora McDonald

Marjorie Heins informs the SCLC that the Campaign for Disarmament, a peace group in Germany, requests for Dr. King to give 5-10 lectures for about 2,000 - 3,000 people.

Letter from Mark Raphael to MLK

Mark Raphael, the President of the All-Square Student Congress Speaker's Bureau at New York University, invites Dr. King to talk about his priorities in America and plans for Washington.

Letter from Marlys Michels to MLK

Miss Michels informs Dr. King that she will no longer contribute to the SCLC. She disagrees with Dr. King's statements on the Vietnam War, as well as his support of Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from Marshall C. Dandy to MLK

Marshall C. Dendy, the Executive Secretary of the Board of Christian Education, invites Dr. King to be a speaker for the organization's conference in Montreat. Dendy also suggests that Dr. King reconsider his stance on America's involvement in Vietnam, even though he also detests war.

Letter from MLK to a Former Supporter

This is an edited copy of Dr. King's response to someone withdrawing support due to his position on the Vietnam War. King's detailed rewrites show efforts to avoid further misunderstandings about his position. He applies nonviolent philosophies to both the civil rights and peace movements, however, does not attempt to link the two. Rather than asking for Negroes to be exempt from the draft as a special privilege, he believes Negroes have an intimate knowledge of the effects of violence. As such, they should have a special moral obligation not to inflict violence on others.

Letter from MLK to C. B. King

Dr. King thanks C. B. King for a recent contribution and tells him that the widespread, articulate opposition to the war in Vietnam is unprecedented in American history.

Letter from MLK to Carl Heassler

In this letter, Dr. King offers words of gratitude to Mr. Heassler for his letter of support. He goes on to critique the War in Vietnam with a nonviolent philosophy.

Letter from MLK to Colonel Harold C. Wall

In a letter to Colonel Harold C. Wall, Dr. King writes to appeal the Selective Service case of Thomas E. Houck Jr. He has been classified as 1-A by Local Board #75, meaning he was available for unrestricted service. Dr. King wanted to change Houck's classification to 1-O based on Houck's moral devotion to peace.

Letter from MLK to Herbert Lamont

This document contains a small series of responses between Dr. King and Herbert Lamont. Dr. King expresses gratitude for Mr. Lamont's moral support, while Lamont affirms Dr. King's sentiments on peace and justice.

Letter from MLK to Irene Shunfenthal

Dr. King thanks Irene Shunfenthal for her support. He says that those who seek peace through nonviolence must use every creative means of protest available to achieve U.S. disengagement from Vietnam, and must also urge that nonviolence be adopted internationally to settle disputes among nations.

Letter from MLK to Jesse Hill, Jr. Regarding His Speech on Vietnam

Dr. King sends two of his recent speeches on Vietnam, so that Jesse Hill, Jr. may know firsthand his position rather than distorted statements from other sources.

Letter From MLK to John R. Kellam Regarding Vietnam War

Dr. King thanks Kellam for not only his letter but for forwarding a letter from Democratic Rhode Island Senator John Pastore. All three men oppose the war in Vietnam, and Dr. King responds that is becoming increasingly difficult to understand the reasons behind US foreign policy.

Letter from MLK to Johnie Lee Halle

Dr. King informs Mr. Halle that he has no intention of linking the Civil Rights Movement to the peace movement. He asserts that the Vietnamese have consistently been the victims of colonialism, and argues that war and violence are not acceptable means of resolving conflicts.

Letter From MLK to Judge B.

Dr. King writes to Judge B, inviting him to the Board Meeting in Washington D.C. The meeting is to discuss the War in Vietnam and Poor People's Campaign.

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