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Vietnam War / Vietnamese Conflict

Associated Archive Content : 246 results

Letter from Raymond Lavyrick to MLK

Mr. Lavyrick informs Dr. King that he enjoyed his address concerning the Vietnam War. He explains that President Johnson is not concerned about the issues of the war and that he was recently heard misquoting the Bible.

Letter from Rev. Harvey H. Batos, Jr. to MLK

Rev. Batos Jr. expresses his support of Dr. King's political involvement despite the critisim by the New York Times.

Letter from Rev. Michael Hamilton to MLK

Rev. Michael Hamilton informs Dr. King that the book "The Viet Nam War - Christian Perspectives", which includes Dr. King's address on Vietnam, has just been published. Hamilton also notifies Dr. King of publicity plans and expresses gratitude for his contribution.

Letter from Robert E. Johnson to Mrs. Agnes Stewart

This document is a letter from Robert E. Johnson to Mrs. Agnes S. Stewart pertaining to Mr. Johnson's objection to participating in the Armed Forces physical examination due to his belief that "there is a better way to solve conflicting problems that beset men".

Letter from Robert Powell to MLK

In this letter, Robert Powell protests Dr. King's participation in a demonstration against the Vietnam War. He also expresses his thoughts on Dr. King's perspective of the war as a "racist war."

Letter from Ruth Frank Rosenwald to MLK

Ruth Frank Rosenwald writes urging Dr. King to commend Robert Kennedy for his advocacy of peaceful alternatives to war and to invite him to issue a joint call for a meeting of civil rights and peace leaders and President Johnson for dialogue on U.S policy in Vietnam, Santo Domingo and West Germany.

Letter from Sam Garwood Concerning MLK's Involvement with the Vietnam Conflict

Sam Garwood expresses his opinion on the Vietnam War. It could have a negative effect on the Civil Rights Movement if Dr. King doesn't address the situation in a pleasing way to Americans. He believes that a lot of support gained could be lost due to the War.

Letter from Sampson Oliver to MLK

Sampson Oliver writes Dr. King expressing his feelings concerning the immoral notion of Vietnam War.

Letter from Samuel Kirk to President Johnson

Mr. Kirk, Director of the Institute for Research on Exceptional Children, writes to President Johnson expressing his desire for peace in Vietnam. Kirk suggests that Johnson appoint a Peace Commission consisting of Dr. King and others to help create solutions for ending the war.

Letter from Silvio Romoaldo to MLK

Silvio Romoaldo sends Dr. King his support for the Civil Rights Movement and the efforts against the Vietnam War.

Letter from Stephen Harris to MLK

Numerous riots have occurred at Marble Mountain Air Base in Vietnam due to mounting racial tensions. Stephen Harris, of the United States Marine Corps, writes to Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael addressing his frustration and the concerns of many Negro servicemen stationed there.

Letter from the Assistant Secretary of State to Fay Ramsey Regarding Vietnam

In this letter from Dixon Donnelley (the Assistant Secretary of State), Fay Ramsey receives thanks for a letter she sent President Johnson and an explaination of the state's logic regarding the Vietnam situation.

Letter from Violet Panzram to MLK

In this letter, Ms. Panzram praises Dr. King for his "strong statements" against the Vietnam War and includes a contribution for his "peace efforts."

Letter from W. F. Washington to MLK

Rev. Washington assures Dr. King that he has his support as a fellow minister for his stand on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Walter Gibson to MLK

Mr. Gibson writes to Dr. King concerning his political position on the Vietnam War. He believes that the war is a just war because the end is to help the South Vietnamese halt the spread of communism.

Letter from William W. Boyer to MLK

This Letter from William W. Boyer, Chairman of the Convocations Committee, to Dr. King informs Dr. King the transcription of his "Future of Integration" speech to the Kansas State University academic community has arrived. A copy of the transcription will be published in Issues 1968.
This enclosed transcription of his speech addresses many varied issues affecting American society.

Letter of Support from John Ladd to MLK

In this letter, John Ladd expressed support to Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Mr. Ladd referenced a desire that his enclosed monetary contribution be directed toward efforts to gain equality for Negroes.

Letter to Dr. King

The author of this letter writes to oppose Dr. King's view of the government being the greatest infuser of violence. The author attributes Communism as the root of violence, and asks Dr. King to consider the consequences of unfavorable criticism during such times.

Letter to MLK from Carolina Smith

The author negatively expresses ideas to Dr. King, in his actions towards the Vietnam War.

Letter to MLK from Robert McAfee Brown to MLK

Mr. McAfee requests that Dr. King issues a statement, and host a service in his Church, supporting Bill Coffin.

Letter to Senator Robert Kennedy from MLK

Dr. King applauds Senator Robert Kennedy for his statement on Vietnam. Both Robert Kennedy and former President John F.Kennedy contributed to the overall political philosophy and concept of a world of diversity. In addition, Dr. King mentions several political entities of progression due to the intellect and partnership with Senator Kennedy.

Letter to the Editor of Chicago Daily News Regarding Israeli Statehood

This letter from Mrs. Irene M. Koch to the editor of the Chicago Daily News addresses the issue of anti-Semitism and the Israeli War in 1967. Mrs. Koch, while not anti-Semitic, does not support the war Israel is prosecuting against its Arab Neighbors. Mrs. Koch draws parallels between Israel's war and the United State's involvement in Vietnam.

March for Peace Flyer

This flyer advertises the March for Peace. The event, which was organized in Atlanta and held on Hiroshima Day, focused on ending the war in Vietnam.

Meet the Press

This transcript of a special 90-minute edition of NBC’s Meet the Press features Dr. King and other prominent Negro civil rights leaders discussing the topics of war, nonviolence, integration, unemployment and black power. The program was aired on radio and television.

Memo from Alan Geyer to Readers of Vietnam Packet

A letter from the Council for Christian Social Action discusses the distribution of a packet containing materials concerned with the Vietnam War. The results of the packet are strong moral and political judgments about the war.

Memo from Barbara Moffett to MLK

Barbara W. Moffett writes a memorandum to Dr. King and Harry Wachtel, commenting on a second draft statement submitted by the American Friends Service Committee to the SCLC. Ms. Moffett also sends a copy of the memo with a handwritten note to Andy Young.

Message from Betty Babcock to MLK

Betty Babcock writes Dr. King and discusses similarities in international conflicts before wishing him blessings around the Christmas holiday.

Minutes for the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights

The minutes for this meeting include the Civil Rights act of 1967, the "Freedom Budget," and discrimination in military off-post housing.

Minutes of the Council of United Civil Rights Leadership Meeting

These minutes from the meeting of the Council of United Civil Rights Leadership give a description of the topics discussed. Topics included: meeting with President Johnson, Office of Economic Opportunity memoranda, Inter-organizational conflict and fundraising.

MLK Address on Racial Injustice, Poverty, and War

Dr. King addresses the French community during his "Racial Injustice, Poverty, and War" speech. He discusses topics such as poverty, politics, war, and the government.

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