Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Martin Luther King, Jr. - Political and Social Views

Associated Archive Content : 447 results

Invitation to MLK from Randolph Carter

Randolph Carter invites Dr. King to be the featured leader in a Conference on the Church and Human Rights.

Is It All Right To Break The Law?

Excerpts from Dr. King's 1963 "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" are used to establish an affirmative answer to the question, "Is It All Right to Break The Law?"

Italian Weekly Requests MLK Views on Gandhi

The Italian weekly magazine, Mondo Domani, plans to publish a lengthy article on Gandhi. The editors wish to include Dr. King's response to several questions on nonviolence, outlined in this letter from their United States Representative Enzo Viscusi.

JFK's Executive Order In Housing

This document is a draft of an article, written by Dr. King, to be placed in the Amsterdam Newspaper. Dr. King breaks down the housing order signed into law by President Kennedy. He makes clear that housing discrimination is a large hurdle to ending segregation.

Justice in Mississippi

Dora McDonald records notes by Dr. King concerning an unjust ruling in Mississippi. He claims that more legislation is needed to enable the federal courts to prosecute these crimes.

Kansas City Star Drawing

This editorial cartoon from the Kansas City Star depicts Dr. King at a bar with two bottles labeled "Anti-Vietnam" and "100 Proof." A young girl representing the Civil Rights Movement pulls on his coat and asks him to come home.

King Says Voice of White Moderate Needed

This press release entitled, "King Says Voice of White Moderate Needed," highlights Dr. King's challenge to moderate white southerners to become more vocal against racial injustices.

King's Viet Stand Has Cost Him Some Financial Support

The Associated Press releases this article acknowledging the lack of funding forwarded to the SCLC because of Dr. King's views on Vietnam. The article also discusses how various other civil rights organizations have received more contributions based on the financial support drawn away from Dr. King. However, the article notes that Dr. King emphasizes the imperative link between the civil rights and peace movements.

Let My People Vote

In this statement for the Amsterdam News, Dr. King assures that a victory is in the midst regarding the Senate's recent passage of the voting bill. He elaborates on the objectives of SCOPE, as there is much to accomplish. He ends the statement with the battle cry, "Let My People Vote."

Letter from a Disillusioned Supporter to MLK

An anonymous author, who identifies himself as a "white Jew," explains his decision to withdraw financial support from Negro organizations and causes. The reasons for his lack of support include the death of two Jews in Philadelphia, who died aiding the Negro cause, and the rioting in cities.

Letter from A.C. Spectorsky to MLK

Editorial Director, A.C. Spectorsky, requests comments from Dr. King regarding an interview with Senator Charles Percy from the April issue of PLAYBOY Magazine. The Illinois Republican
discusses a range of subjects including American military presence in Vietnam, President Lyndon B. Johnson's leadership style, and Negro-white relations.

Letter from Abraham Ribicoff to MLK

Senator Abraham Ribicoff, Chairman of the Subcommittee on Executive Reorganization, asks Dr. King to appear at a congressional hearing about the problems facing urban cities. He explains that the subcommittee does not understand the full psychological, social and economic conditions that challenge people living in urban areas.

Letter from Ada Krozier to MLK

Ada Krozier encloses a contribution to Dr. King for his work in the civil rights movement and his stance on the Vietnam War. She feels that Dr. King's position is an opportunity to pursue peace and call an end to the war.

Letter from Alice Murphy to MLK

Alice Murphy informs Dr. King that she is considering writing a segment about the current situation in Alabama. It is necessary that she speak directly with him, as she does not want to say anything "without some degree of personal knowledge."

Letter from Alma Szatmary to MLK

Alma Szatmary writes Dr. King concerning his stance on the Vietnam war. Szatmary writes that it should be prohibited for Puerto Ricans and African Americans to serve as oppressors in Vietnam when they are the ones being oppressed here at home.

Letter from Ann & John Flynn

In this letter, Ann Flynn requests a copy of the text of Dr. King's speech made at Riverside Church.

Letter from Anonymous Sender to MLK

A critic writes Dr. King defending President Johnson regarding his decisions for the Civil Rights Movement and African-Americans.

Letter from Arnold Krakower to MLK

Attorney Arnold Krakower explains to Dr. King the reasons why he must reject a financial appeal to aid the SCLC. According to Krakower, Dr. King's position in the civil rights movement gave him high notoriety. However, once Dr. King turned his attention to oppose the war in Vietnam, Krakower believes he has no choice but to object mixing civil rights and foreign policy.

Letter from Arthur Spence to MLK

Spence writes Dr. King defending the critical perceptions that some whites hold of blacks. As an African American, Spence feels that some members of his race have developed bad habits.

Letter from Asher Feren to MLK

Asher Feren writes to Dr. King to express his concerns for the Hyde Park High School Unity Plan.

Letter from Aubrey Brown Jr. to MLK

Aubrey Brown Jr., Editor of "The Presbyterian Outlook," asks Dr. King to provide a statement regarding the obligations American voters have to choose "officials who have high personal moral standards." The statement will be used in the publication's annual "Going to College" Handbook.

Letter from Barbara Austin to SCLC

Mrs. Austin writes the SCLC concerning Dr. King's views on Vietnam. She encloses a contribution to the organization because of Dr. King's courage to speak out against the war.

Letter from Barry Diamond to MLK

Barry Diamond, Chairman of Choice 68 at the University of Florida, informs Dr. King that his name will be on the ballot and invites him to speak at the University. Diamond explains that Choice 68 is "a national collegiate presidential primary sponsored by Time Magazine."

Letter from Ben Selsby to MLK

Ben Selsby writes Dr. King in support of his stand on the Vietnam War and answers the critics by increasing his SCLC contribution.

Letter from Benjamin Brown to MLK

Benjamin Brown, literary editor for CORE, thanks Dr. King for his previous letter regarding the "CORE Guide" publication. Brown asks that CORE be granted permission to reprint copies of Dr. King's past speeches.

Letter from Bent Ostergaard to MLK

Mr. Ostergaard, a representative of the Danish section of Amnesty International, invites Dr. King to speak publically at a Copenhagen Cathedral. He also invites Dr. King to participate in a local tour to bear witness schools and various social institutions. The document concludes with an additional letter addressed to Dr. King's assistant Miss D. McDonald.

Letter from Berwyn Jones to MLK

Berwyn Jones offers his gratitude to Dr. King for his strong stance in opposition to the Vietnam War. The letter is written a day after Dr. King makes his famous speech entitled "Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence" at Riverside Church in New York.

Letter from Beth Arnold to MLK

Ms. Arnold writes to inform Dr. King that she is head of his campaign committee for a campus movement for the upcoming election. She asks for any campaign material Dr. King can provide.

Letter from Billy E. Bowles to MLK about an Interview

In this letter Billy E. Bowles requests an interview with Dr. King. Bowles is especially interested in Dr. King's perception of the new governor, Governor Maddox.

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

This version of Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail," published by the American Friends Service Committee, also includes the original statement made by the clergyman that prompted Dr. King's response. The eight clergymen described Dr. King's actions as "unwise and untimely." In his response, Dr. King references biblical and historical figures to illustrate why the Civil Rights Movement can no longer wait. He also expresses his frustration with many within organized religion and the moderate white American.

Pages