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Martin Luther King, Jr. - Political and Social Views

Associated Archive Content : 447 results

Letter from Herbert E. Brown to MLK

Mr. Brown informs Dr. King that though he is an "enthusiastic backer" of Dr. King's efforts "to improve the lot of the Negro," he does not agree approve of Dr. King combining the Civil Rights Movement with a stance against the war in Vietnam. If Dr. King continues on this path, Brown warns that he will no longer be able to support Dr. King.

Letter from Hester DeLacy to MLK

Hester De Lacy contributes to the SCLC and expresses an urgent need for written copies of Dr. King's speeches. Mr. De Lacy informs Dr. King that he would prefer a copy of a speech delivered to a large and small audience in both the North and South of the country.

Letter from Irene Zimmerman to MLK

Miss Zimmerman expresses disapproval in Dr. King's support of Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from Irmgard Svenson

Irmgard Svenson requests that Dr. King send copies of his "Beyond Vietnam" speech.

Letter from J. D. Williams to MLK

Professor Williams requests a phone interview with Dr. King concerning the studies of a select group of Honors students at the University of Utah.

Letter from J. Martin England to MLK

J. Martin England of The Ministers and Missionaries Benefit Board of the American Baptist Convention expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's philosophy and work.

Letter from Jack Egle to Reverend Martin Sargent

The European Director of the Council of Student Travel, Jack Egle, writes Martin Sargent addressing a statement made in the Herald Tribune regarding Dr. King's and Harry Belanfonte's opinions on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Jacob H. Gilbert to MLK

Congressman Gilbert writes Dr. King to thank him for his letter and copy of his book "Why We Can't Wait." Prior to the vote to seat the Mississippi delegation, Dr. King contacted several government officials urging them to vote against the seating. Congressman Gilbert states that he objected to the seating albeit unsuccessfully.

Letter from James E. Byrd to MLK

James E. Byrd, Campus Coordinator at Lenoir Rhyne College, writes Dr. King requesting materials for the Choice '68 campaign.

Letter from James L. Davis to MLK

Here a retired minister offers support and good wishes to Dr. King while pleading with him to reconsider his stance on Vietnam.

Letter from James W. Thetford to MLK

A 75-year old man expresses his discontent with the Vietnam War and his belief that America's economic and social problems are inextricably linked to the ongoing military occupation in Vietnam.

Letter from Jean Rand to MLK

Jean Rand writes Dr. King requesting a copy of his speech regarding peace in Vietnam and sends him a monetary contribution.

Letter from Jennings Randolph to MLK

Jennings Randolph writes Dr. King expressing thanks for his previous telegram regarding support of the Voting Rights bill which would abolish poll taxes.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that Constance Webb would to ask him questions regarding the biography she is writing on Richard Wright.

Letter from John A. Race to MLK

Congressman Race of Wisconsin thanks Dr. King for his letter concerning the seating of the Mississippi Delegates. Race seems to suggest that he was of the majority who "did authorize their formal acceptance" although he states that he was in the "minority."

Letter from John Edgar Hoover to MLK

FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover thanks Dr. King for his telegram concerning FBI agents in Alabama.

Letter from John F. Steinman to MLK

John F. Steinman commends Dr. King for his courageous leadership and encloses a check for the SCLC and SCLF.

Letter from John G. Kirk to MLK

John G. Kirk of Metromedia asks Dr. King to write an editorial for a future publication called "America Now." Dr. King's article is to be based on the assumption that it is the responsibility of the government to enhance the dignity of individual citizens.

Letter from John R. Hanson to MLK

Congressman Hansen of Nebraska thanks Dr. King for the telegram he sent urging House Representatives to vote against the seating of the Mississippi Delegation. The Democratic Representative informs Dr. King that he was one of the 86 Congressmen "who requested a roll call vote on the issue."

Letter from John Shirley to MLK

John Shirley, of the Oxford University Cherwell Newspaper, poses a list of questions to Dr. King concerning Civil Rights, the Vietnam War, and the emergence of Black Power groups. Shirley assures the Reverend of his gratitude for any feedback he may provide, and informs him of the circulation of the literature at being well over 10,000 within the University.

Letter from John T. Walker to MLK

On behalf of the Washington Cathedral. John Walker extends an invitation for Dr. King to preach at the Cathedral and articulate the true premise of the Poor People's Campaign to their congregation. Walker believes that Dr. King's physical presence will help eliminate doubts that this civil disobedience campaign will turn to violence. Dr. King is would eventually preach the final sermon of his life on March 31 at the Washington Cathedral under the subject "Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution."

Letter from John W. Wydler to MLK

Congressman Wydler of New York responds to Dr. King's letter on the seating of the Mississippi delegation to Congress. Dr. King's letter, sent to several government officials prior to the vote, urges House Representatives to vote against the seating of the current delegation.

Letter from Jonathan B. Bingham to MLK

Congressman Bingham of New York replies to Dr. King's donation solicitation letter requesting a renewal of the previous year's fifty dollar contribution to SCLC. The congressman states that he would like to know whether contributions will be used to influence foreign policy before committing to a decision.

Letter from Joseph S. Clark to MLK

Mr. Clark, a representative of the United States Senate, requests a written statement from Dr. King concerning a recent Bill (2993) up for election.

Letter from Judy Grey to MLK

Judy Grey, a student at Tennessee Polytechnic Institute, informs Dr. King of a paper she is required to complete regarding an issue in the South and requests that he provide any information concerning the movement in the South.

Letter from Julius Avery to MLK Regarding Vietnam

In this letter Julius H. Avery writes MLK to urge him to reconsider his position on the Vietnam war. Avery expresses his support for world peace but stresses that Dr. King's remarks are volatile and do not warrant "opening the flood gates to Communism."

Letter from Kathleen Reid to MLK

Kathleen Reed, the editor of Alert Catholic, writes to Dr. King enclosing the most recent copy of the publication. The Newsletter of the National Council of Catholic Men features a quote by Dr. King to President Johnson which stated "the conditions which you so bravely set out to remedy when you entered office" have not changed.

Letter from Ken Dyal to MLK

California Congressman Ken Dyal writes Dr. King to acknowledge receipt of a telegram and agree with his comments in reference to an enclosed supporting newspaper article.

Letter from Kennon Brownlee to MLK

Kennon R. Brownlee, a social science major at Bishop College, asks Dr. King for his opinion concerning the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Kenyan Student to MLK

A student writes Dr. King expressing support for his movement and social views in regards to Civil Rights.

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