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Life Magazine

Associated Archive Content : 15 results

"Leaders of 'Socialist Scholars' Talk Guerrilla War in Cities Next Year"

Alice Widener argues that the Black Power movement will result in domestic guerilla warfare. The writer's stance originates from a Black Power workshop she attended. Widener argues that the U.S. government must "round up and imprison" the "Red-Black power criminals."

Letter from Debbie Steiner to MLK

Debbie Steiner of Willburn, New Jersey tells Dr. King how she was moved by his article in Life magazine, which she calls "a realistic summary of why the Negro can not wait." She explains her discontent with prejudice and inquires about how young people can influence change.

Letter from Eugene G. Huston to Ralph Abernathy

Mr. Huston writes to request that the photos of Mrs. King and her daughter which appear on the cover of Life Magazine, April 1968 be widely distributed. Huston believes that if this is done the larger public will be just as moved as he was and further serve to promote the memory of Dr. King.

Letter From Joan Daves to Clarence B. Jones

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Clarence B. Jones about the carbon of the letter sent to Dr. King regarding an excerpt from "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Joan Daves to Miss Dora McDonald

Dr. King's literary agent Joan Daves requests that Dora McDonald send her the full text of Dr. King's speech in Montgomery. She also reports on Dr. King's recent book royalties.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Joan Daves sends three checks to Dr. King. The first check is an advance due from Harper and Row, the second represents an advance from NAL and the third is a partial payment from "Life."

Letter from Martin Gal to MLK

Martin Gal, Producer in Public Affairs at WMSB TV, requests permission rights to Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" for broadcasting purposes. Gal seeks to create a short pictorial documentary with Dr. King reading the text as a voice-over.

Letter from Maude Ballou to MLK

Maude Ballou, Dr. King's personal secretary at the Montgomery Improvement Association, writes to Dr. King during his recovery at Harlem Hospital in New York, after being stabbed a few days before. Ms. Ballou provides Dr. King a detailed report of pending correspondences awaiting his attention.

Letter to Ms. Hoover from Joan Daves

Joan Daves writes Miss Carol Hoover of the SCLC to coordinate efforts to market and promote Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter to Representatives of Harper & Row and N.A.L from Joan Daves Regarding "Why We Cant Wait"

This memo serves to inform all parties involved with the publishing of "Why We Can't Wait" of the arranged prepublication agreements made by Mrs. Joan Daves.

Life Magazine: Why We Can't Wait

This excerpt, taken from Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait," appears in an issue of Life Magazine. King parallels the experience of handicapped people to the social handicap of the Negro. Comparing instances of governmental aid, he notes that there has been "countless other measures of compensatory treatment that the nation has accepted and approved as logical and moral." King continues the segment by referencing the stance of three American presidents that he has engaged conversation on the subject of civil rights.

Memo from Joan Daves to MLK

In this memo, Joan Daves informs Dr. King about the final payment for an excerpt from Life Magazine, titled "Why We Can't Wait."

Our Struggle

Dr. King drafts this speech entitled "Our Struggle" for the April 1956 publication of Liberation. Dr. King discusses how both whites and blacks have internalized a caste system that perpetuates Negroes as inferior beings. He speculates that racial peace is maintained in the caste system due to harsh discrimination and a loss of faith in the black community. Dr. King states that the shift in race relations, and subsequent tension, occurred when Negroes "began to re-evaluate themselves," finding self-respect and dignity.

Project "C" Progress Report

Detailed progress report on a project that is referred to as Project "C."

The New Frontiersmen

William Miller recaps the recent presidential elections and the important issues President John F. Kennedy will have to address. President Kennedy has proposed a new program called the New Frontier, which for many African Americans, is believed to be a part of the nonviolent Civil Rights Movement. Miller states that the Civil Rights Movement is not one that can be overlooked by the President and must be seriously addressed if he wants to stay true to his political platform.