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Civil Rights Movements

Associated Archive Content : 594 results

An Analysis of the Ethical Demands of Integration

Dr. King argues that desegregation is only the first step towards the ultimate goal of complete racial equality. He explains that nonviolence, driven by the power of love, is crucial to create true integration.

Annual Address Delivered at the First Annual Institute on Nonviolence and Social Change

Dr. King's speech at the First Annual Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change addresses many issues regarding the African American. The most recurring issues are of obtaining and maintaining freedom, equality and personal dignity.

Annual Report by MLK

Dr. King illustrates in his annual report the innovative changes that have occurred within the country, as well as the world. He also expresses the Republican stand point on civil rights and the constant concern of racism.

Annual Report Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Operation Breadbasket, unemployment, poverty, nonviolence, Negro voter registration, and a financial report are just several of the topics covered in this informational pamphlet detailing the ways in which monies were divided amongst the many functions of the SCLC.

Annual Report of The President: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

In the SCLC's Annual Presidential Report, Dr. King chronicles a decade of organization's activities to eliminate segregation. The report was delivered at the Tenth Anniversary Convention of the SCLC.

Anonymous Card and Article to MLK

An anonymous sender encloses an article written about Dr. King and his anti-Vietnam War sentiments.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An unknown author questions Dr. King about his leadership and involvement in the Civil Rights Movement. He references various racial, political, and social events, and stresses that Dr. King is responsible for all the riots, violence and looting.

Anti-Semitism, Israel and SCLC:- A Statement on Press Distortions

This is a document that addresses the impression that the press created reporting that the SCLC was part of a group that condemned Israel and endorsed the policies of the Arab powers. This document also includes the annual report of the president by Dr. King.

Antidotes For Fear

Dr. King uses this sermon to discuss the causation of human fears while identifying four ways in which these shortcomings can be combated. He does not promote the eradication of all human fears, for some are essential to creation and innovation. However, Dr. King encourages the elimination of unfounded fears as a method to overcome adversities that are experienced in life.

Appeal to the President of the United States

This document, prepared for the centennial of the Emancipation Proclamation, serves as a plea to President Kennedy and a legal brief. The plea is to use the centennial as an opportunity to "rededicate" the nation to the principles embedded in the Emancipation Proclamation; to make an executive order to end all statutory segregation and discrimination in the states; and to exercise full leadership protecting civil rights, including the use of force, if nonviolent methods fail.

Article Briefly Summarizing MLK's Life, Leadership and Accomplishments

This article acknowledges the many accomplishments made by Dr. King. The writer cites the various highlights of Dr. King's work and maintains "...America will never be the same."

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy on House Resolution 7152

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy comments on House Bill 7152, the bill that eventually culminated in the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Kennedy argues that the bill is a "test" to white Americans and that it must "effectively eliminate racial discrimination in voting, education and in employment." He addresses the eleven titles of the bill and describes the differences between the current bill and the version introduced by the president. Kennedy finally asserts that if the bill is not passed, then "the whole nation will be the loser."

Background Information on March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

This passage provides a reason as to why the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom had to occur. The Brown vs. Board Supreme Court decision, the Prayer Pilgrimage, and other peaceful demonstrations all resulted in the march.

Bayard Rustin: Right to Work Laws

This booklet, written chiefly by Bayard Rustin, suggests that the "Right to Work" laws handicap minorities in the American workforce. The "Right to Work" law is a statute that bans union security agreements, which Rustin posits is undemocratic and assists in exploiting and perpetuating American poverty.

Biographical Sketch of Dr. Ralph David Avernathy

This biographical sketch of Dr. Abernathy outlines his positions, recognitions, education, travel experience and personal life. Dr. Abernathy served as President of the SCLC after Dr. King's death and also served as a member of the NAACP, and Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc.

Biographical Sketch of James Bevel

This one page biography summarizes the achievements of James Bevel, one of the founding members of SNCC. The biography highlights Bevel's involvement with civil rights drives in Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi, including the Freedom Rides and numerous SCLC action programs.

Biographical Sketches of Leaders of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

These are biographical sketches of various leaders who were involved in the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedoms. These distinguished individuals were involved in organizations that focused on equality and nonviolence.

Birmingham Desegregation Settlement Agreement

Dr. King reviews the settlement made between the City of Birmingham and civil rights protesters. This agreement includes the integration of lunch counters, sitting rooms, restrooms, and water fountains within ninety days.

Birmingham Jail

Reverend Robert J. Leuver sends Dr. King an article titled "Birmingham Jail.". In the article, Harry Cargas learns that there are some members of the police force who support the Civil Rights Movement, but are too fearful to speak out against the racial atrocities. It was here that Mr. Cargas realized the ongoing struggle for outspoken and silent supporters of the movement for social change.

Black Caucus of Eastern Airlines

The Black Caucus of Eastern Airlines sponsored, Future Impact, a program to promote economic development for the company. The program also aids in enhancing the skills of the company's black employees.

Black is Beautiful, and It's So Beautiful To Be Black

This staff newsletter "Black Is Beautiful, and It's So Beautiful," published by the SCLC, explains the upcoming events that the organization has in store. The newsletter communicates as to who acquired new positions within the SCLC and speaks to how the SCLC wishes to continue with projects based in Chicago, Cleveland, and Washington through Operation Breadbasket.

Black Power

This is a chapter sermon for Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here?" The civil rights leader traces the early development of Black Power and its eventual surge onto the national political scene. Though understood as a direct opposition to the nonviolent movement that organizations like SCLC, CORE, and SNCC originally supported, King describes Black Power as a "disappointment wrapped in despair."

Black Power and the American Christ

The Christian Century published this article by historian and civil rights activist Vincent Harding in its June 4, 1967 issue. In the essay, Harding, friend, associate, and speech writer for Dr. King, claims that Eurocentric Christianity antagonized the Black Power Movement.

Bloody Sunday

Dr. King recollects events that occurred on "Bloody Sunday" in Selma, Alabama as 525 blacks marching were tear-gassed, clubbed, and beaten by police officers and discusses how television helped the Civil Rights Movement. King asserts that the television helps us all be participants in vital matters and it adds trust and validity to the movement.

Briefing Sheet on Cleveland's Civil Rights Issues

This document contains the briefing notes on Cleveland's Civil Rights Issues.

Cape Times: Dr. Luther King in Bad Company

In this Cape Times article, author J. M. Gray poses six questions to Dr. King regarding recent sightings with Communist Party members.

CBS's Face the Nation Interview

This is an official transcript of an interview on CBS's Face the Nation that focused on the Vietnam War. Dr. King explains his vision for the Civil Rights Movement and Antiwar Movements. The Great Society, Dr. King believes, is being shot down over Vietnam, as the funding for the programs are diverted to the war.

CCCO Draft Constitution

John A. McDermott, Executive Director of the Catholic Interracial Council, writes this letter to members of the Agenda Committee for the Coordinating Council of Community Organizations in Chicago. As a member of the Committee, Dr. King receives this letter urging a review of the enclosed draft of the organization's new constitution. Proposed areas of focus outline delegated staff tasks, partnership with SCLC, and broadening membership opportunities.

Chicago - Striving Toward Progress

The author of this article identifies two leaders, to include Dr. King and Joseph Germano, in the civil rights movement to speak on the new political focus on economic disparities.

Chicago Freedom Fund Festival

The Chicago Freedom Fund Festival, organized by Mahalia Jackson, served as a benefit for the SCLC.

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