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Civil Rights Movements

Associated Archive Content : 594 results

Letter from Harry Denman to MLK

Mr.Denman writes Dr. King to share words of support and encouragement as Dr. King prepares to turn himself over to the Birmingham officials. Denman suggests that Dr.King should turn this event into a major demonstration.

Letter from Harvey Weeks to MLK

Harvey Weeks writes to Dr. King to show his support for Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War. He also offers some advice and makes an appeal.

Letter from Helen Harrington to MLK with Poems

Helen Harrington writes to Dr. King to offer him the use of her poems in his writing and speeches. The poems, attached, are entitled 'Color Book,' 'Viet Nam,' and 'Two Prisons.' In a post script, Harrington urges Dr. King to run for president on an independent ticket, provided a peace candidate is not nominated by the Republican or Democratic parties, adding that she wants no more of President Johnson.

Letter from Helen Knox to MLK

Mrs. Knox acknowledges receipt of Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" and briefly discloses details of her involvement in the Civil Rights Movement in Harlem.

Letter from Henry Darby to Edward Brooke

Henry Darby, a student at Atlanta University asks for information about Dr. King's involvement in the Vietnam War.

Letter from Henry L. Gerner to MLK

Henry Gerner applauds Dr. King on his accomplishments and what he is doing for the Civil Rights Movement. He also invites Dr. King to speak at Bowling Green State University, a request that is echoed in a letter from Donald Stricker.

Letter from Herbert Coulton to Friends

Herbert Coulton, SCLC Director of Affiliates, encourages more supporters to become church affiliates. Mr. Coulton informs readers that the "SCLC is commonly considered as the Social Action Arm of the Christian Churches in America."

Letter from High School Student to MLK

Sheila Gavin is a high school student writing to Dr. King to inquire about his choice to be a part of the civil rights movement.

Letter from Illinois High School Student Beth Allen to MLK

High school student Beth Allen writes Dr. King inquiring about how she can contribute to the Civil Rights Movement in Chicago, Illinois.

Letter from Illustrated World Encyclopedia to Dora McDonald

Bobley asks Ms. McDonald if Dr. King will allow a reprint of one of his articles to be published in the Illustrated World Encyclopedia in lieu of King writing a new piece.

Letter from Irene M. Koch to MLK

Irene M. Koch uses a Native American legend of a man walking in the moccasins of his enemy to gain understanding of his enemy. She relates this legend to the current civil rights movement and specifically the civil rights movement in Chicago, Illinois.

Letter from Irving Engel to MLK

Dr. King has been invited to visit Israel. While they are delighted to have him, because of the demands of the Civil Rights Movement, it is suggested that he make this visit while he is at the meeting of the Organization of African Unity in Ghana in order to be considerate of his time.

Letter From Irving Neiman to MLK

Irving Neiman offers his legal services to the SCLC for their work in the civil rights movement.

Letter from J. L. Roberts to MLK

Minister Roberts writes to Dr. King expressing his support of the Civil Rights Movement along with making a donation to the SCLC.

Letter from J.W. Parnell to MLK

Rev. J.W. Parnell writes Dr. King to request support for his "one man demonstration march." The demonstration, Parnell outlines, features a bicycle ride from Coney Island, New York to Long Beach, California, conjoined with prayer and a symbolic water ritual.

Letter from James A Mills to MLK

Rev. James A Mills commends Dr. King on his efforts in the Civil Rights Movement and includes a donation to the SCLC.

Letter from James A. Farmer to MLK

Mr. Farmer thanks Dr. King on behalf of the Riverside Church for being their guest speaker. He tells Dr. King of the positive reaction that he received on his sermon.

Letter from James H. Bowman to Rev. Andrew J. Young

James H. Bowman writes to Rev. Young requesting for Mr. Ralph Henry to be stationed by SCLC on the near west side of Chicago.

Letter from James McLaurin to MLK and Andrew Young

James McLaurin asks Dr. King to spend part of a day with the students and faculty at Garrett. The topic that they want Dr. King to speak about is the seminary's role in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Joan Daves, Literary Agent to Dr. King, addresses the correspondence, to Dr. King. The letter includes photostats of reviews for Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The Chicago Tribune, New York Times Daily and Washington Star are just a couple of the newspapers that published reviews for the book.

Letter from John A. McDermott to Chicago Daily News

John McDermott anticipates discrimination in housing and job opportunities as a result of a proposed federal project for a nuclear power plant in Illinois. Ideally, The Weston Project should create equal opportunities for both black and white Americans. McDermott expresses concern considering the current conditions of racial injustice that exists in Illinois.

Letter from John and Enid Howarth to Friends Soliciting Financial Support

Mr. and Mrs. Howarth of New Mexico express their disapproval of violence against Negroes in the South and request donations for a Fourth of July celebration in support of SCLC, SNCC and other civil rights groups.

Letter from John Conyers to MLK

John Conyers, Congressman-Elect for the first district of Michigan, writes Dr. King seeking advice and endorsement for his campaign.

Letter from John H. Telfer to MLK

Mr. Telfer, a 6th grade teacher, offers his sincerest gratitude for Dr. King and his efforts to eradicate injustice. He includes an additional thanks to Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth, a fellow civil rights leader.

Letter from John T. Walker to MLK

On behalf of the Washington Cathedral. John Walker extends an invitation for Dr. King to preach at the Cathedral and articulate the true premise of the Poor People's Campaign to their congregation. Walker believes that Dr. King's physical presence will help eliminate doubts that this civil disobedience campaign will turn to violence. Dr. King is would eventually preach the final sermon of his life on March 31 at the Washington Cathedral under the subject "Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution."

Letter from Josephine Baker to MLK

Josephine Baker offers support and encouragement to Dr. King in the civil rights campaign and asserts "without unity there cannot be a solid victory."

Letter from Juanita to MLK

Juanita offers praise and gratitude to Dr. King for his assistance regarding some imprisoned associates. Juanita also offers her prayers to Dr. King.

Letter from Julian Bond to MLK

Julian Bond, a member of the Georgia House of Representatives, shares a quotation from W.E.B. DuBois' "The Souls of Black Folk." The excerpt is consistent with Dr. King's view on the importance of "keeping white allies in the civil rights movement."

Letter from Kathy Boudin to MLK

Conference Coordinator Kathy Boudin invites Dr. King to participate in a three-day conference held by the students of Bryn Mawr and Haverford Colleges.

Letter from L. Alexander Harper and Charles E. Cobb to Edith M. Lerrigo

Edith Lerrigo writes with concern regarding the support of the "Crisis and Commitment" call by several civil rights leaders. Lerrigo endorses Dr. King's decision to refuse his signatory on the document supporting the call, stating that this act "should have been sufficient to give pause to groups like the YWCA before jumping on the moderate bandwagon."

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