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Martin Luther King, Jr. - Radio Public Speaking

Associated Archive Content : 62 results

Letter from Nickolas W. Dick to MLK

Nickolas W. Dick writes Dr. King on behalf of Dr. Frank H. Epp extending an invitation to the Reverend to hold a series of meetings in Winnipeg. Dick closes by requesting confirmation of the extent of his stay.

Letter from Oliver Hunkin to MLK

In this letter Oliver Hunkin, of the British Broadcasting Corporation, offers his gratitude to Dr. King for an interview that he gave to Gerald Priestland of BBC-2.

Letter from Pat Carter to MLK

Dr. King receives a letter from Miss Pat Carter, the public relations director at Katz Radio, thanking him for his address regarding the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

Letter from Paul Rene of KYAC to MLk

Paul Rene, the Public Relations Director and News Editor of KYAC Radio requests to interview Dr. King on voter registration.

Letter from Peter Manniche to MLK

Peter Manniche, Chairman of the Scandinavian Executive Committee invites Dr. King to the Scandinavian nations to make public, radio, and television speaking appearances. Mr. Manniche is hopeful the Dr. King's presence in Eastern Europe will garner support for the civil rights cause in America.

Letter from Pierre Servais to MLK

Pierre Servais informs Dr. King that his company will publish the French translation for the book "Strength to Love." He congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize and invites him to be a part of various interviews in Paris and Brussels to promote the book.

Letter from Rabbi Martin E. Katzenstein to MLK

Rabbi Martin Katzenstein writes Dr. King to express appreciation for Dr. King's participation in the worship service at Temple Israel in St. Louis, Missouri. He expresses the impact that Dr. King's address had on the congregation and the African American community in St. Louis. He encloses contributions from church service and a check to cover Dr. King's travel expenses.

Letter from Rev. Samuel B. McKinney to MLK Regarding Travel Arrangements to Seattle

In this letter, Rev. McKinney reviews details regarding Dr. King's itinerary for his visit to Seattle. He mentions that the community has worked exceedingly hard to gain city-wide support for his first visit to the Pacific Northwest.

Letter from Rev. Thomas S. Maloney to MLK

Thomas Maloney asks for assistance in preparing his dissertation on Dr. King's philosophy of nonviolence for the Gregorian University in Rome. He requests clarification on Dr. King's definition of violence, nonviolence, agape and justice, as well as how the four principles relate.

Letter from Robert A. Jackson to MLK

Robert A. Jackson, Minister for Knox's Church, congratulates Dr. King for receiving the many honors bestowed upon him. Minister Jackson invites Dr. King to come speak at either the Polio Dinner or the 100th Anniversary of the Church Home.

Letter from Robert G. Hardy of KMOX to Dora McDonald

KMOX radio in St. Louis, Missouri would like to have Dr. King on their program called "Sounding Board" for a question and answer session with listeners.

Letter from Sheldon C. Singer to MLK

The Executive Vice President of Ring Radio informs Dr. King of attacks made by callers to the station's "Openline" program. He also invites Dr. King to respond to the attacks.

Letter from Stan Brooks to MLK

Stan Brooks, of Wins Radio 1010, writes Dr. King to express his gratitude and enjoyment concerning Dr. King's appearance on a recent broadcast.

Letter from Weston C. Pullen to MLK

Weston C. Pullen, Vice President for Broadcasting at Time Incorporated, thanks Dr. King for his expedited response and cooperation "in filming a message on civil rights."

Letter from William M. Kunstler to MLK Regarding a Guest Appearance

Here William M. Kunstler (Bill) makes two separate requests: first that Dr. King appear on the Barry Gray radio program for an interview, and, second, to receive a brief tape from the reverend for an NAACP housing rally at the Rye-Port Chester Chapter.

Letter from WSB-TV's Don Elliot Heald to MLK

Don Elliot, of WSB Television in Atlanta, encloses an editorial for Dr. King to review. In the editorial, American Baptist Convention President J. H. Jackson criticizes Dr. King for not taking a more constructive approach towards influencing Congress to pass more civil rights legislation.

Letter with Enclosed Copy of Minutes of the SCLC Board Meeting

Mr. Eskridge sends a copy of the minutes for the SCLC Board Meeting to Secretary Dora McDonald. During the meeting, Andrew Young and Ralph David Abernathy address the twenty-eight board members of the organization at the Regency House in Atlanta, GA.

Memo from Dora McDonald to MLK

Miss Dora McDonald provides Dr. King with a synopsis of updates regarding invitations and correspondences. She notifies Dr. King of the Ann Morris School of Arts attendance at Ebenezer Baptist Church, Eugene Carson Blake's response to Dr. King's acceptance to speak, and V. M. Herron requests of 300 "Black is Beautiful" pamphlets. In addition, she informs Dr. King of the recent telephone calls from various individuals.

MLK Announces End of Birmingham Campaign

The Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights released these remarks by Dr. King marking the end of the Birmingham Nonviolent Direct Action Campaign. King describes the day as a climax in the long struggle for justice and freedom in Birmingham and gives credit to Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, to the thousands who went to jail, to the whites who worked for just solutions and to God. He speaks of the need for continued progress toward equal job opportunities, equal access to public facilities, and equal rights and responsibilities.

MLK Interview: The Negro Protest

Kenneth B. Clark conducts a televised interview with Dr. King, James Baldwin, and Malcolm X. Clark discusses with Dr. King his personal history, the relationship between the love ethic and nonviolent direct action, Malcolm X's claim that nonviolence is perceived by white leaders as weakness, and Baldwin's concern that Negroes will not remain nonviolent if met with brutal responses.

Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech Draft

In 1964, Dr. King became the first African-American to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. At age 35, he was also the youngest recipient of the award to date. Emphasizing a philosophy of nonviolence, Dr. King writes this acceptance speech commemorating the courageous work of the Civil Rights Movement. He highlights the brutality faced throughout the United States and addresses the irony of accepting a peace prize on behalf of a movement that has yet to obtain peace.

Radio Sermon Titles and Dates

In this document Dr. King lists a series of radio sermon titles and their respective dates of delivery.

Radio Sermons Listing

Under the title "Radio Sermons," is a listing of sermon titles and dates given by Dr. King.

Schedule for Oslo Visit

This document outlines Dr. King's twelve-day travel schedule to Oslo, Norway to receive the Nobel Peace Award. The itinerary includes various banquets, speaking engagements and meetings with individuals including the leaders of the British Council of Churches and the mayor of Oslo.

Stanley Levison Suggests Use of Radio

Stanley D. Levison, New York businessman and close friend to Dr. King, suggests to increase the use of radio as a means to reach masses of American citizens in the fight for civil rights.

Sunday with Martin Luther King, Jr. Radio Sermon on WAAF-AM Chicago, IL

This copy of Dr. King's segment on WAAF-AM radio, entitled "Sunday with Martin Luther King," explains the plight of the "Negro" in the South as similar to the oppression experienced by the Israelites in the book of Exodus.

Survey from Jack Hillhouse to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. about Mass Communications Media

This incomplete survey form is from a graduate student, Jack Hillhouse, seeking to understand the connection, if any, between mass communications media and race riots, demonstrations, and disturbances.

The Casualties of The War In Vietnam

Dr. King speaks on behalf of the United States presence in Vietnam at a symposium held in Los Angeles, California. He addresses the moral, social, and political causalities that arise as result of war. Moreover, he urges the powers that be to allocate resources for good and rather than evil.

The Civil Rights Struggle in the United States Today

This pamphlet, published by the Association of the Bar of the City of New York, is a transcript of an address delivered by Dr. King titled "The Civil Rights Struggle in the United States Today." In his first speech before the organization, Dr. King recounts the history of the global civil rights movement.

The Importance of Voting

This transcript documents Dr. King's recorded statement intended to raise awareness of voting and voter registration.

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