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United States Army

Associated Archive Content : 53 results

Advice for Living

Advice for Living is a column Dr. King uses to help people with moral dilemmas. In this issue, he receives questions from an 18-year old about his mother's drinking issues, a 24-year old with relationship issues, and others.

American Influence in Vietnam

Dr. John C. Bennett, President of the Union Theological Seminary, expresses his political beliefs concerning the presence of American military in Vietnam.

Amsterdam News: The Measure of A Man - Jackie Robinson

Dr. King describes his interpretation on the life and efforts of Jackie Roosevelt Robinson to further the cause of Social Justice in America.

Anonymous Letter to Charles C. Diggs Jr.

This anonymous letter to Congressman Charles Diggs, Jr. of Michigan details the grievances suffered by Negro and Caucasian females in the U.S. Army. The authors assert that they routinely are subjected to segregation in public accommodations and are denied equal opportunity for promotion and reenlistment.

CBS's Face the Nation Interview

This is an official transcript of an interview on CBS's Face the Nation that focused on the Vietnam War. Dr. King explains his vision for the Civil Rights Movement and Antiwar Movements. The Great Society, Dr. King believes, is being shot down over Vietnam, as the funding for the programs are diverted to the war.

Don B. Pratt's Position Statement

Don Pratt expresses concerns about his induction into the US Army during the Vietnam War. Mr. Pratt questions the morality of this "aggressive" war, which would enable him to inflict violence against his "neighbors" of Vietnam.

Invitation to the 20th Anniversary World Conference Against Atom and Hydrogen Bombs

Ichiro Mortaki, of the Japan Congress Against Atom & Hyrdrogen Bombs, invites Dr. King to their conference taking place 20 years after two atomic bombs were dropping on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, in World War II. This leading Japanese disarmament organization was founded the same year they extended this invitation to Dr. King.

Letter from "A Red Blooded American Who Is Opposed to Your Tactics of Un-Americanism"

This letter to Dr. King criticizes his presumed anti-American activities. The author, who signs as "A Red Blooded American who is opposed to your tactics of un-Americanism," describes herself as the mother and grandmother of men who have served in the armed forces.

Letter from a Soldier to MLK

In one of a series of letters to Dr. King, "Private Friend" seeks further advice from Dr. King on how to combat the discrimination he faces in the Army. Friend's response to Dr. King from an earlier correspondence provides detailed information regarding the sentencing structure of the unfair charges against him.

Letter from Anne Braden to A.D. King

Joe Mulloy will be highlighted in a set of galley proofs for a story in the February issue of The Southern Patriot. Anne Braden informs Reverend A.D. King of the induction refusal by Mr. Mulloy and how it correlates to many SCLC staff members. Mrs. Braden is sending the letter to Dr. King as well and hopes that Rev. A.D. King will participate in this action.

Letter from Beatrice Sutton Rogers to MLK

Beatrice Rogers writes Dr. King expressing her disappointment with his change in his position after he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. She encloses an article from the Washington Post in which critics discuss a speech King gave regarding Vietnam War.

Letter from Benjamin Mays to MLK

Dr. Mays informs Dr. King of his recommendation to confer an honorary degree from Morehouse College on Dr. J. Curtis Dixon. Mays includes a biographical sketch of Dr. Dixon and asks Dr. King to respond to the letter with his approval or disapproval.

Letter from Daniel F. Byrne to MLK

Lieutenant Colonel Daniel F. Byrne, an army chaplain from the 24th Infantry Division, requests a copy of the address Dr. King gave to the World Conference of Churches in Switzerland.

Letter from Dean George W. Jones to MLK

George Jones writes Dr. King on behalf of his brother-in-law, Captain Yancey Martin, who is subject to a trial based on previous accusations. Jones hopes that Dr. King is able to utilize his role with the S.C.L.C. to assist Captain Martin.

Letter from Edmond F. Tommy to Senator Edward W. Brooke

Mr. Toomy, a veteran of the first World War, writes to Senator Brooke detailing his stance on current military efforts. He provides a historical outline of war related events in relation to the United States military. He asserts that other Negro leaders are hindering progress in the Civil Rights movement due to their lack of patriotism.

Letter from Edward Taylor to MLK

Staff Sergeant Edward Taylor, United States Army, requests Dr. King's assistance or advice in appealing his bar to reenlistment and court martial.

Letter from Edward Taylor to MLK

Edward Taylor, an African American soldier in Vietnam, requests Dr. King's aid in a military justice matter.

Letter from Eula Shaw to MLK

Calling Dr. King "The Trouble Maker of the United States," Mrs. Shaw criticizes Dr. King's methods in the Civil Rights Movement. She argues that a "campaign of love is in order" rather than demonstrations.

Letter from Glenn Greenwood to MLK

Glenn Greenwood informs Dr. King of a directive the United States Army issued that forbids all US Army personnel from participating in civil rights demonstrations. Greenwood expresses that this is a huge "infringement on freedom of assembly" and should be brought to the public's attention immediately.

Letter from J. P. Brookshire to MLK

J. P. Brookshire supports Dr. King's desire for equality and justice, but is critical of the methods by which Dr. King uses to obtain these goals. He also criticizes Dr. King's stand on the conflict in Vietnam and the draft.

Letter from John H. Johnson to MLK

John H. Johnson, President and Editor at Johnson Publishing Company, informs Dr. King that a soldier has donated money to his organization and the NAACP.

Letter from Juan Mari Bras to MLK

Juan Mari Bras, Secretary-General of the Movement for Puerto Rican Independence, writes Dr. King about Puerto Rican opposition to the Vietnam War. Bras informs Dr. King that his group will be at the April 15th Mobilization Committee Against the War in Vietnam rally outside of the United Nations. Bras hopes to communicate with Dr. King face to face and exchange ideas.

Letter from L. Howard Bennett to MLK

L. Howard Bennett writes Dr. King and encloses statistical information regarding African American involvement in the Vietnam War.

Letter from Louis Toney to MLK

Army veteran Louis Toney attempts to solicit a job with the SCLC, citing military experience, a college degree and ordination as characteristics that qualify him for the job.

Letter from Lucille Banta to MLK

In addition to a financial contribution, Lucille Banta sends Dr. King a proposal for the civil rights and peace movements to oppose the Vietnam War. She suggests that they work together to "plan and organize a nationwide United Peace and Freedom Parade to Washington."

Letter from Lucius D. Clay to MLK

Retired Army Officer Lucius D. Clay, responds to Dr. King, informing him that his telegram has be forwarded to T. C. Fogarty.

Letter from MLK on behalf of Cosby Wallace

Dr. King requests reconsideration of Mr. Cosby Wallace's status in the U. S. Army. The financial strain on Mr. Wallace’s family and a physical disability warrants his not being inducted.

Letter from MLK to Colonel Harold C. Wall

In a letter to Colonel Harold C. Wall, Dr. King writes to appeal the Selective Service case of Thomas E. Houck Jr. He has been classified as 1-A by Local Board #75, meaning he was available for unrestricted service. Dr. King wanted to change Houck's classification to 1-O based on Houck's moral devotion to peace.

Letter from PLAYBOY Magazine to MLK

Playboy Editorial Director A.C. Spectorsky requests comments from Dr. King regarding Kenneth Tynan's article "Open Letter to an American Liberal," which accompanies the letter.

Letter from Robert Sandberg from MLK

Robert Sandberg criticizes Dr. King for his recent statements on the Vietnam War. Mr. Sandberg states that Dr. King's position has now undermined his effectiveness as a leader in the Civil Rights Movement.

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