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United States Army

Associated Archive Content : 53 results

Letter from Stephen Harris to MLK

Numerous riots have occurred at Marble Mountain Air Base in Vietnam due to mounting racial tensions. Stephen Harris, of the United States Marine Corps, writes to Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael addressing his frustration and the concerns of many Negro servicemen stationed there.

Letter from Thomas Price to MLK

Major Thomas Price, United States Army, requests Dr. King's assistance in retaining his commission and active duty service with the United States Army.

Letter from US Soldiers Lester Hill, James Gardner and Homer Collier to MLK

Three Negro soldiers communicate with Dr. King regarding the racial practices of white GIs against fellow Negro GIs. The soldiers feel pressure to not only fight against the enemy but to watch over their shoulders to shield themselves from intimidation against the white GIs. Lester Hill writes on behalf of soldiers requesting Dr. King's help.

Letter to MLK

The author in this letter writes Dr. King to describe the racial discrimination he faces in the Army. He writes that about mistreatment he has received from his sergeants as well as the court martial he faces for missing a bed check, but he is afraid to say much more because he is not certain that Dr. King will receive the letter.

Letter to the Editor of the New York Times

On April 15, 1967, a massive antiwar demonstration was held in New York City. Demonstrators marched from Central Park to the United Nations building where they were addressed by prominent political activists such as Dr. King, Floyd McKissick, Stokely Carmichael, James Bevel, Jan Berry Crumb, and Dr. Benjamin Spock. In this letter, a veteran and demonstrator writes the Editor of the New York Times to express his critical view of an article that reported on the event.

Methodist Church Statement on Vietnam Conflict

The Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church releases a statement regarding the conflict in Vietnam and possible outcomes and solutions. The board urges steps leading to a withdrawal of US forces from Vietnam.

MLK Address at Mass Meeting in Eutaw, Alabama

Dr. King challenges the Negro residents of Eutaw, Alabama to participate in the upcoming SCLC Poor People's Campaign. In this address, he urges the citizens of Eutaw to occupy Washington, D.C. in an effort to press Congress for a redistribution of wealth in America. He urges, "All ye who are tired of segregation and discrimination, come unto us. All ye who are overworked and underpaid, come unto us."

MLK Address at the Georgia State Capitol Regarding Julian Bond

Dr. King delivers this speech at the State Capitol of Georgia protesting the legislation refusal to seat black politician Julian Bond. King calls this a "grave injustice" particularly since the state legislature of Georgia considers itself protecting the United States Constitution. Dr. King points out the irony of this act and exposes other irresponsible actions of the legislature.

MLK Address to Chicago's Peace Parade and Rally

Dr. King discusses the nation's present-day involvement with Vietnam. The civil rights leader claims that as a nation founded on democratic and revolutionary ideas, the United States has a moral obligation to intervene on behalf of those suffering and dying throughout the world.

Newspaper Article "Negro Nation Ratified"

This article discusses a group of black nationalists who ratified a declaration of independence for a separate Negro nation. The new nation was named the "Republic of New Africa."

Resolution of the SCLC Board Regarding Vietnam

This resolution of the Tenth Annual Convention of the SCLC, outlines the effects of the expansion of the Vietnam War and recommends future action steps for the administration of the organization.

Statement from the Eisenhower Administration to the NAACP

In an address to the NAACP, Vice President Richard Nixon discusses the reasons that progress has been made in the Eisenhower Administration and the goals that the organization needs to continue working toward.

Statement of the Committee for Emmett Doe

The Committee for Emmett Doe issues a statement both explaining Doe's situation and also asking for support. Doe, an Army paramedic, faced court-martial for allegedly cursing a white superior. He was later acquitted of the charges.

Stop the War Bring the Troops Home

This brochure advertises a program to rally the support for eradicating the United States influence in Vietnam. It is distributed by The October Mobilisation, an Australian initiative responding to a call for international protest of the Vietnam War.

The Commercial Appeal: But No Services

This photo and accompanying caption relate the story of Dr. King and an associate clerical organization conducting a silent vigil at Arlington National Cemetery after being blocked judicially from holding a memorial service in that venue.

The Jackie Robinson Saga

This brief biographical sketch highlights Jackie Robinson's life and his accomplishments as a baseball player, Army Lieutenant and business executive.

The New York Herald Tribune Articles Concerning Vietnam

These copies of several news articles denounce United States military involvement in the Vietnam War.
The New York Herald Tribune claims the there is no formal program to inform the public about what is happening in Vietnam.
The Nation claims that the United States Army is being used to bolster a brutal dictatorship in an undeclared war.
The Washington Star carried an Associated Press report on children with napalm burns.

The Sword That Heals

Dr. King, in this article adapted from his book "Why We Can't Wait," evaluates the intimidation the Negro faces as a result of securing freedom. He uses the campaigns in Birmingham, Albany, and Montgomery as backdrops to depict how the use of nonviolent direct action causes unrelenting sacrifice in the face of grave danger. This article was published in this quarterly summer 1964 issue of "The Critic."

The U.S. Negro, 1953

This Time Magazine article discusses socioeconomic components for the Negro in 1953. Topics range from the Mason-Dixon Line and Cadillacs, to the difference between Southern and Northern Negroes.

To Set Our People Free

This poem by Mrs. Eudora V. Savage is dedicated to the African American veterans of World War Two.

Views of Senator Barry Goldwater

This document depicts brief summaries of Senator Goldwater's sentiments regarding civil rights, social welfare, education, right-wing extremism, disarmament and peace.

Who Are We?

In this sermon Dr. King contemplates "who are we?" and "what is man?". He differentiates between the pessimistic attitudes of the materialistic understandings of man and the optimistic attitudes of humanistic definitions of man. King also states that man is neither all good nor all bad, but a combination. Man is both an everlasting miracle and mystery.

World Journal Tribune: Dream and Demagogy

The World Journal Tribune writes an article entitled "Dream and Demagogy." The article expounds upon Dr. King's involvement of foreign policy in opposition of the Vietnam War. The authors assert that Dr. King actions have crossed a "thin line" between responsible dissent and irresponsible divisiveness. The article criticizes Dr. King for his political activism and details the military's involvement.

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