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Anderson, Marian

b. 1897 - d. 1993

Marian Anderson was an African American contralto who fought against racism in the arts. In 1939, Anderson was barred from performing before an integrated audience by the Daughters of the American Revolution. President Roosevelt and his wife Eleanor arranged for Anderson to give a concert on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, where she drew a diverse crowd of 75,000. In addition to giving benefit concerts for the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE) and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), she was named an official delegate to the United Nations Human Rights Committee. In 1963, she performed at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Later that year, she was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President John F. Kennedy.

Associated Archive Content : 8 results

Annual Address by MLK for the Montgomery Improvement Association

This document outlines Dr. King's address for the Fourth Anniversary of the Montgomery Improvement Association, held at Bethel Baptist Church in Montgomery. In the address, Dr. King speaks about the history, achievements and current task of the Association.

I Have A Dream

This is an excerpt of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech, as delivered at the March on Washington. The moderator asks Marion Anderson to sing, "He's Got the Whole World In His Hands."

Letter from 'Hardworking People' to MLK

A white American recommends a different approach to Civil Rights demonstrations. He believes that if celebrities are placed at the fore front of the marches that the black community would then be motivated to work.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Event Program

This program outlines the events for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom rally at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D. C.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Lincoln Memorial Program

This is the Lincoln Memorial program for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Notable leaders including Dr. King, Walter Reuther, and Whitney M. Young, Jr., will make remarks at the march. Also included is a list of demands, a joint statement from ten organizations and a map.

March on Washington Record

Entitled "We Shall Overcome!" this document advertises the selling of the "authorized record" of the 1963 March on Washington. The record includes "inspiring songs of freedom" and speeches from the historical march.

Proposed Program: Lincoln Memorial

This program entails several male and female speakers who are deeply rooted and connected in the Civil Rights Movement. These speakers were expected to speak at the Lincoln Memorial.

Who is Truly Great

Dr. King addresses the subject of individual greatness within society and how to truly go about achieving such a status. He begins by dispelling common signifiers of greatness before indicating that greatness can only be substantively measured through the ability to put others before self. Dr. King cites the life of Jesus Christ as an example of humility culminating into greatness.