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Anderson, William G.

b. 1927

Dr. William G. Anderson moved to Albany, Georgia in 1957 to begin a private practice in osteopathic medicine. He became active in attempts to improve the racial situation in the city. He served as president of the Albany Movement, an organized initiative founded by several local and national organizations in the fall of 1961. The movement fought for desegregation. It involved the participation of Dr. King, whom Anderson had met while living in Atlanta. Following his work with the Albany movement, Dr. Anderson pursued a distinguished career as a physician, university faculty and administrator. He served as a member of the Board of Trustees of the American Osteopathic Association and in 1994 was elected the first African American president of that organization.

Associated Archive Content : 19 results

Address by Jackie Robinson at SCLC Freedom Dinner

Guest speaker Jackie Robinson discusses his personal struggles with adopting the philosophy of nonviolence, race relations and the far-reaching efforts of the SCLC.

Albany Justice Draft for Amsterdam News

Dr. King expounds upon the city of Albany and the adversities it faced that brought about the focus of international scrutiny. Dr. King notes two prominent international occasions that occurred in Albany, the peace walk to Cuba and the Guantanamo Peace March. He cites quotations from Chief Laurie Prichett and Bradford Lyttle. Dr. King further elaborates on the injustices of Albany, segregation, discriminatory practices and more.

Appeal from Wyatt Tee Walker for Albany Support

Following the arrests of Dr. King and three others who held a prayer vigil at the Albany, Georgia City Hall, Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker issues this appeal for support from those active in the civil rights movement. He calls for telegrams to be sent to federal, state, and local officials, prayer vigils, and the wearing of black armbands.

Letter from Dr. William G. Anderson to MLK

Dr. William G. Anderson accepts Dr. King's invitation to join the Board of Directors of the SCLC for a three year period.

Letter from Frank Jones to MLK

Reverend Frank Jones sends Dr. King a letter expressing his concern about the recent occurrences in Albany, Georgia.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Ernest J. Foster

Dr. King thanks Dr. Ernest Foster for his financial contribution to the SCLC. He informs Dr. Foster of the distribution of the proceeds from a previous reception and discusses the significance of supporters to the movement. Dr. King also encloses a copy of his recent book, "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from MLK to Frank Jones

Dr. King writes Rev. Jones of Greater Piney Grove Baptist Church in Atlanta to acknowledge receipt of his contribution to the Albany Movement. Dr. King informs Rev. Jones that his check will be forwarded to Dr. William G. Anderson, founder of the Albany Movement, to assist in the work of the desegregation alliance.

Letter from MLK to William Sibley

Dr. King thanks Dr. Sibley for his contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He also reports the results of a recent fundraising reception, which will be used to establish Dr. Robert Hayling's practice and provide legal defense to participants in the Albany and St. Augustine Movements.

Letter from MLK to William Smith

Dr. King thanks Dr. Smith for his contribution of $50 to the SCLC. He updates him on how much money was raised at a recent reception and details how it will be used. Dr. King also sends a copy of his latest book as an expression of appreciation.

Letter from Robert Kennedy to MLK

Attorney General Robert Kennedy addresses the prosecutions that involved leaders from the Albany Movement. Kennedy discusses these details and facts of the case with Dr. King.

Letter from Robert Kennedy to MLK

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy writes to Dr. King regarding a case of civil disobedience in Albany, Georgia. He discusses the boycotting of Carl Smith's supermarket due to Smith serving as a juror in the civil action case of Ware vs. Johnson.

People in Action: Albany Justice

Dr. King discusses numerous injustices in Albany, a pacifist movement to Cuba, and police brutality against Negroes.

People in Action: The Solid Wall Cracks

In this draft of an article for the April 13, 1963 New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King discusses the cracks in the wall of segregation in Albany, GA: first the city’s closure of segregated public facilities to avoid protests by the Albany Movement, then the repeal of segregation from the city’s code.

Public Statement by the Albany Movement

The statement from the Albany Movement addresses issues of racial injustice and stresses the importance of equality for all.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1962

Dr. King discusses the terrible cost of securing voting rights for blacks, especially in Leesburg, Georgia, where the Shady Grove Baptist Church was bombed and burned following the SNCC's use of the space to register voters.

Statement by MLK & Dr. W. G. Anderson

Dr. King and Dr. Anderson release a statement declaring a "Day of Penance" for those in the Negro community who have not yet adopted the nonviolent strategy.

Statement Condemning Judge Elliot's Restraining Order

Dr. King and Dr. William G. Anderson, President of the Albany Movement, denounce US District Judge J. Robert Elliott's temporary restraining order that prevents them from staging protests. They add that, out of respect for the federal judiciary, they will abide by the order and appeal to a higher level. They assume the order applies only to the named defendants and colleagues and not to the entire community and will not discourage others from taking action. Judge Elliott’s injunction was later overturned by the Fifth Circuit US Court of Appeals.

Telegram from Emory R. Searcy to MLK and Others

Dr. Searcy advises Dr. King and Dr. Abernathy to consider relinquishing their involvement with the Albany Movement. The sender suggests that this action may help to dispel contention resulting from "the presence of outsiders" and the process of negotiations.

Telegram from MLK and Joseph Lowery to William Anderson

Joseph E. Lowery and Dr. King addressed this telegram to William Anderson asking him to attend a SCLC board meeting regarding the Poor People's Campaign.