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Public Opinion

Associated Archive Content : 195 results

Letter from Mary E. Peabody to MLK

Mary E. Peabody writes a letter requesting that Dr. King send her a copy of one of his books along with a signature. She also informs him of her opinion on education and the racial issues the city of Boston faces.

Letter from Maschera Pier-Carlo to MLK

Maschera Pier-Carlo, a citizen of Italy, writes Dr. King informing him that his book "Strength to Love" helped her understand the true value of Christian love and God.

Letter from Matthew Schechter to MLK Regarding NAACP

Mr. Schechter encloses correspondences between hm and the NAACP regarding Dr. King's comments on the Vietnam War and the civil rights movements. Mr. Schechter is returning his membership card due to the NAACP's "uncalled for commentary" concerning Dr. King. Mr. Morsell, Assistant Executive Director of the NAACP, informs Mr. Schechter that the NAACP took a position on the issue because of numerous requests they received from local members and leaders.

Letter from Michell Blue to MLK

A sixth grader from Berkeley, California writes Dr. King to share his supportive view. In closing the young man remarks, "I don't have much to say but thank you."

Letter from Midsouth Management's Ardin Hartman to MLK

Ardin Hardin writes to Dr. King thanking him for the invitation to the SCLC's convention, but informs him that he will not attend because he does not agree with Dr. King's views on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Miss Ethel Klemm to MLK

Miss Ethel Klemm, a retired white teacher from Mississippi, suggests that Dr. King ease on trying to push for intergration so rapidly. She recommends that, thru education and job training, Negroes will be in a better position to be accepted and integrated into mainstream society.

Letter from MLK to Adam Clayton Powell

Dr. King writes Adam Clayton Powell to seek advice on how to handle Powell's return from self-imposed exile in Bimini. Powell sought to publicize the event with a public announcement by Dr. King. However, Dr. King and Powell's lawyers suggest that they arrange a quiet, staged arrest with local officials to prevent public pressure from forcing a more lengthy arrest over the criminal contempt charges Powell faced for vacating his seat in Congress. Dr. King suggests more publicity could follow once Powell's lawyers free him on bond and begin the appeals process.

Letter from MLK to Former Supporters

Dr. King addresses former supporters concerning his controversial stance on Vietnam. He examines the country's colonial history and struggle for independence as contributing factors to America's current military presence in Vietnam. The civil rights leader defends his commitment to nonviolence as an "exceptional moral responsibility" that must transcend international borders.

Letter from MLK to Mary M. Drummond

Dr. King thanks Ms. Drummond for her supportive correspondence regarding "Letter from Birmingham Jail." He states that the opportunity to fight racial injustice is a "rare privilege" and regards his open letter as an attempt to examine racial inequity under the lens of Christian ethics.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Jack H. O'Dell

In response to recent allegations, Dr. King and members of the SCLC Administrative Committee conduct a formal investigation on Mr. O'Dell's reported association with Communist affiliates. Dr. King regrettably informs him that due to this speculation, despite lack of concrete results, he must permanently resign from his position with the SCLC's New York office.

Letter from Morris A. Morse to Rev. Abernathy

Morris Morse sends his condolences regarding the death of Dr. King. Mr. Morse further explains his opposition of the idea of building a two million dollar church in Dr. King's honor, because he believes that the reverend would not want such a memorial when so many people are in need.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Tullberg to MLK

The Tullberg family from New Hampshire conveys their support to Dr. King for his stance against the Vietnam War. They believe that the war is a violation of the basic principles of human rights.

Letter from Mr. William A. Linsley to MLK

This document features a faculty member from the University of Houston conferring with Dr. King on "I Have a Dream" materials to be used for his students' curriculum.

Letter from Mrs. Berdeax to MLK

Mrs. Berdeax of Ohio informs Dr. King that she supports his position on the war in Vietnam and is ashamed of her country.

Letter from Mrs. Donald H. Hage to MLK

Mrs. Hage praises Dr. King's work, particularly his use of peaceful means to accomplish his goals. She also requests information about how best to help at the local level in Colorado.

Letter from Mrs. Ellen H. Mapes to MLK

Mrs. Ellen H. Mapes' letter to Dr. King to discusses her concerns regarding living in urban environments. She maintains that personal responsibility initiatives are more in order than current ones, e.g. family planning and self-improvement through education and job training.

Letter from Mrs. Presley Layer to MLK

As a member of the Urban League and other civic organizations, Mrs. Layer expresses her concerns about the conduct of marches verses a more militant tactic. Mrs. Layer asserts that we live in a violent nation and is concerned that violent pacifist will become uncontrollable. She concludes with informing Dr. King she is an admirer and long supporter of the SCLC.

Letter from Mrs. Ruth Spencer to MLK

Mrs. Spencer shares her belief that "the Negro problem and the Vietnamese War are part of the same problem," though often concealed by news media propaganda. She expresses her gratitude towards Dr. King for his nonviolent philosophy and offers her financial support.

Letter from Mrs. Sigrid Sharp to MLK

Mrs. Sharp commends Dr. King for his open opposition to the Vietnam War. She further requests copies of his April 4, 1967 speech before New York's Riverside Church, in order to raise political awareness and garner support against the war effort.

Letter from Mrs. Stitzinger to Martin Luther King Sr.

Mrs. Stitzinger asserts that the African American community is entitled to their rights but that it doesn't mean that white people have to acknowledge or accept them. She suggests that they create black owned restaurants, hotels, etc. solely so black people will not have to interact directly with the white race.

Letter from Mrs. William Henry Slakey to MLK

Mrs. Slakey writes Dr. King to commend his letter denouncing the term "Black Power." In the post script, she requests a personal response instead of a form letter.

Letter from Nathan Watts to MLK

Mr. Watts asks Dr. King to call off the March on Washington because of the political backlash he foresees. He predicts the march will harm the civil rights bill that is being discussed in Congress., which would later be passed as the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Neale J. Pearson to MLK

A Ph.D. candidate from the University of Florida writes Dr. King to tell him about the political and social progress made by the university's Americans for Democratic Action (ADA) chapter. The writer tells Dr. King that the Chapter has invited various political figures to speak at an upcoming lecture series. He extends the invitation to Dr. King and Dr. Charles Anderson, while simultaneously seeking Dr. King's help in contacting Dr. Anderson. The student informs Dr.

Letter from Ned French to MLK

A high school student requests the political opinions of several famous individuals concerning the national issues and potential candidates of the 1968 presidential election.

Letter from Ora Belle Tamm to MLK

Ora Belle Tamm objects to the reaction of Negro leaders during the Adam Clayton Powell affair and expresses her disappointment to Dr. King.

Letter from P. A. Riley to MLK

A critic writes Dr. King a carefully constructed letter to share her view on his Vietnam War stance. As a widow of a late Korean War veteran, she claims that Dr. King's position undermines "everything that our fighting men, down thru the long, long, years, have fought and died for." The widow questions Dr. King's combination of civil rights and peace movement issues, and asserts "patriotism is one of the factors free men live and prosper under!"

Letter from Paul Rene of KYAC to MLk

Paul Rene, the Public Relations Director and News Editor of KYAC Radio requests to interview Dr. King on voter registration.

Letter from Pennsylvania State University to Dora McDonald

Nina C. Brown writes Dora McDonald on behalf of Pennsylvania State University to thank her for arranging Dr. King's trip to the school.

Letter from Phillip S. Gelb to MLK

Mr. Phillip Gelb encloses a donation to the SCLC and states that he appreciates the efforts being made by the protestors in Birmingham. Furthermore, he identifies the movement as the "most vital and pro-American in the nation today."

Letter from Phyllis Light to the NAACP

Mrs. Light argues that the goals of the NAACP are too low. She compares the efforts of the movement to those of Hitler, Mussolini, Napoleon, and Caesar. Because of these comparisons, Mrs. Light promotes segregation amongst the races and accuses educated African Americans of abandoning their culture.

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