Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Public Opinion

Associated Archive Content : 195 results

Letter from PLAYBOY Magazine to MLK

Playboy Editorial Director A.C. Spectorsky requests comments from Dr. King regarding Kenneth Tynan's article "Open Letter to an American Liberal," which accompanies the letter.

Letter from Robert Needles to MLK

A critic writes to Dr. King to explain why he will not support his program. He insists that Dr. King's activity only contributes to the "deterioration of the colored people in America."

Letter from Robert Stark to President Johnson

Mr. Stark sends the President his views on Liberty and Justice for All, calling programs designed to benefit Negroes a "farce," denouncing Negro lack of responsibility and claiming that it is civil rights not the Vietnam War that is expensive. He is upset that there is so much media focus on blacks and believes it is time to insist upon white rights.

Letter from Roud Shaw to MLK

Roud Shaw of Kentucky writes to Dr. King informing him that his defense is "too well written" and should be crafted for a second grade level. Shaw also encloses a self-written article that appeared in the Louisville Courier Journal, in which he affirms his support to Dr. King and asserts that Cassius Clay should not be drafted for military service.

Letter from Sam Garwood Concerning MLK's Involvement with the Vietnam Conflict

Sam Garwood expresses his opinion on the Vietnam War. It could have a negative effect on the Civil Rights Movement if Dr. King doesn't address the situation in a pleasing way to Americans. He believes that a lot of support gained could be lost due to the War.

Letter from Samuel F. Daly to MLK

The author suggests Dr. King reclaim his leadership of the civil rights movement from Stokely Carmichael and Rap Brown.

Letter from Shinichi Oshima to MLK

Fifteen year old Shinichi Oshima of Japan, writes Dr. King expressing his admiration and appreciation for the movement and the black man. He also discusses his religious views and his desire to help black men in Africa.

Letter from Spencer Beach to MLK

Spencer Beach expresses dissatisfaction with Dr. King and SCLC's stance on challenging "administration policy" about the Vietnam War. Even though he agrees that the Vietnam War is unjust, Beach feels that Dr. King should narrow his concerns to civil rights marches and issues within the United States.

Letter from Stanley M. Voice to MLK

Stanley M. Voice writes to inform MLK why he is withdrawing support for SCLC in 1967. He thinks Negro leaders need a unified sense of direction.

Letter from Stanley Singer to MLK

Stanley Singer replies to Dr. King's article in the NY Times Magazine entitled, "The Case Against 'Tokenism'." Mr. Singer implies that the Negro race is inferior due to their immorality. He highlights the perceived negative attributes of the African American community by the inadequacies within their family structure. Mr. Singer expounds on nonviolent resistance, the Civil War, the U.S. constitution, and more.

Letter from Steve Rubicz to MLK

Steve Rubicz, of the Student Peace Union at the University of Washington, invites Dr. King to join a "speakers circuit" that will travel to a number of colleges in the Pacific Northwest.

Letter from T. Spurgeon Bell to MLK

T. Spurgeon Bell writes Dr. King to voice his concerns regarding the Civil rights movement. In his opinion the Civil Rights bill is not beneficial to the changes Dr. King seeks. He believes that such bills cannot change varying opinions on other races and asks Dr. King to alter his attempt at social change.

Letter from the Dutch Vietnam Committee to MLK

An unknown author writes Dr. King on behalf of the Dutch Vietnam Committee to seek assistance in stopping the bombing in Vietnam. The committee requests Dr. King record a few powerful remarks which will hopefully influence ending the war.

Letter from the Seventh Grade Class of Woodward School to MLK

Anita Davis, Gail Williams, and Joan Rockwell request an interview with Dr. King for their class project.

Letter from Thomas G. Carson to MLK

Thomas G. Carson writes Dr. King as a white supporter of civil rights legislation, but fed-up with what he feels are the changing views of Dr. King and the riots "committed by Negroes in the name of civil rights."

Letter from Thomas T. Krampf to MLK

New Jersey resident Thomas T. Krampf expresses support for Dr. King's leadership and viewpoints on race relations, morality, and equality. Krampf encloses a self-written story, "The Rosebuds," which speaks to the "'oneness' and the peaceful 'togetherness' of all humanity."

Letter from Tom Offenburger to MLK

In a letter from Tom Offenburger to Dr. King, a response to a newspaper article written by Bruce Galphin is attached. The article refers to the Civil Rights Movement as a rather violent campaign, due to the harm done to the "good order of society." The response argues on the side of the Civil Rights Movement, and further proves that it is indeed a nonviolent campaign.

Letter from V. W. Shepard to MLK

V. W. Shepard admonishes Dr. King for joining the anti-Vietnam War Movement. He explains that prior to Dr. King's joining the movement he considered the Reverend to be "one of the greatest living Americans."

Letter from William A. Rutherford to MLK

William Rutherford recounts his difficulties trying to contact Dr. King while he was in the United States. He goes on to express interest in doing fundraising programs for SCLC in Europe, as well as, mobilizing public opinion in support of the cause.

Letter from William Rutherford to MLK

William Rutherford expresses his enthusiasm for being a new addition to Dr. King's team. Rutherford also encloses newspaper clipping on the Pacem in Terris meetings.

Letter Regarding Politics

The author discusses political issues regrading the president and political parties. In addition, the author suggests that Black Power leaders should obtain positions within the "nut house" and the NAACP should support these appointments.

Letter to Dr. Abernathy Regarding MLK Memorial Service

Dr. Abernathy receives this letter from an anonymous sender suggesting that the SCLC plan a memorial service in commemoration of Dr. King on Emancipation Day. The writer provides a list of music and poems that would be appropriate for the occasion.

Letter to MLK from A Friend of Justice and Democracy

An anonymous individual writes Dr. King to declare that the Jewish people are responsible for the oppression of Negroes.

Letter to MLK from Bertha Fiege Regarding Speech at Riverside Church

In this letter, Bertha Fiege is commending Dr. King on his speech at Riverside Church. She feels he serves great importance to furthering unity, not only racially, but around the world as well.

Letter to MLK from Lee Wood

Lee Wood writes to Dr. King explaining that the Democratic Party and Republican Party are "two shades of the same color." He suggests that because of his qualifications, Dr. King should run for President with Robert Kennedy as his Vice President.

Letter to the Editor of the New York Times

On April 15, 1967, a massive antiwar demonstration was held in New York City. Demonstrators marched from Central Park to the United Nations building where they were addressed by prominent political activists such as Dr. King, Floyd McKissick, Stokely Carmichael, James Bevel, Jan Berry Crumb, and Dr. Benjamin Spock. In this letter, a veteran and demonstrator writes the Editor of the New York Times to express his critical view of an article that reported on the event.

Lucky to Be an American

An anonymous person tells Dr. King that he has lost his place as the most liked American. The author infers that Dr. King should not look for everything free and work for his success.

Memo from the American Lutheran Church to Denver Area Pastors

David Brown of the American Lutheran Church sends an article and copy of a letter from a pastor responding to the article to Denver area pastors. The article, published in "Common Sense," depicts Dr. King as a "Marxist tool" and agitator.

MLK Comments on Jack O'Dell's Alleged Communist Ties

Dr. King attempts to correct the erroneous impressions created by various newspapers alleging Jack O'Dell's connection to "Communist" activities. While Dr. King maintains Mr. O'Dell's strong work performance, the Detroit native will relinquish his role "in order to avoid embarrassment to SCLC."

MLK's Mandate for White Christians Review

Dr. King provides a review for Kyle Hazelden's book, "Mandate for White Christians." In his review he gives an overview of the book's content, along with his opinion on its value.

Pages