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Racism

Associated Archive Content : 421 results

Letter from Detroit Resident to MLK

The Detroit resident identifies the Negro man's concept of equality as being intertwined with the sexual exploitation of white women. The author references an article that cites the disparity in numbers of illegitimate children amongst blacks and white.

Letter from Donald W. Morgan to MLK

Donald Morgan informs Dr. King that northern locations such as New England and Vermont experience racial issues. Mr. Morgan serves as the chairman of the program committee for the 1964 Annual Meeting of the Vermont Congregational Conference. Dr. King is extended an invitation to speak at this conference which is located at the Rutland Congregational Church.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Bill Daniels

Dora McDonald writes Bill Daniels, of WSB-TV, expressing outrage over a cartoon depicting overt racism in a court of law.

Letter from Edward P. Gottlieb to Editor, New York Times

Edward P. Gottlieb writes to the Editor of the New York Times expressing his concern on racial pride. He begins by stating that racial pride is to be deplored and discouraged. Gettlieb concludes with the notion that an African American will feel free only after he is able to explore his own history and culture so he may take from it what he wants for his personal enhancement.

Letter from Edward Wright to MLK

Edward Wright, a member of the Black Panther Party, request Dr. King helps his leader, Huey P. Newton. Newton was wrongfully charged with murder of an Oakland city policeman during the fight for freedom.

Letter from Episcopal Churchmen for South Africa to MLK

This fundraising letter and accompanying bulletin describes the plight of South African non-whites brought on by apartheid and economic disparities. The Episcopal Churchmen for South Africa requests donations and support for the work of the Diocese of Johannesburg.

Letter from Ernst Ketel to MLK

Ernst Ketel writes Dr. King expressing disgust with current political parties and ideals. He requests that Dr. King consider running for political office, preferably president.

Letter from Ethelyn Hall to MLK

Ethelyn L. Hall, a student at the University of Houston, writes Dr. King in reference to SCLC's distribution of literature. Hall is preparing a term paper for a sociology class and requests any available literature relating to civil rights, interracial relations, and racism. She is also interested in learning the purposes and functions of the SCLC.

Letter from Finley Drewery to NAACP

Finley Drewery writes to the NAACP seeking aid for his upcoming criminal trial. He asserts that the state has no hard evidence against him and that his court appointed attorney is trying to make him pay $3,000 to mount a defense in court.

Letter from Franklin I. Gamwell with Enclosed Copy of the Interracial News Service Newsletter

Franklin I. Gamwell, of the Student Interracial Ministry, requests if Dr. King would like to have an intern student at Ebenezer Baptist Church for 1963.
Interracial News Service describes the experiences of many Student Interracial Ministry participants and the pastors of the churches they spent the summers with.

Letter from Georgia Miller to MLK

Georgia Miller informs Reverend Abernathy and Reverend Young that she can no longer contribute funds to the SCLC due to their support of the New Politics group.

Letter from H.M. Arrowsmith to MLK

General Secretary of the British and Foreign Bible Society in Australia, Canon H. M. Arrowsmith, M.B.E., extends Dr. King an official invitation to visit Australia in May 1967. It is the Society's hope that Dr. King's trip will focus primarily on the role of the Bible in relation to the "stature and the status of Man" and the "question of racial equality" throughout the world.

Letter from Harry Fleischman to MLK

Harry Fleischman suggests a text that may be of interest to Dr. King, entitled "We Are Not Summer Patriots." The text highlights anti-Semitism and other efforts to attain equality.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to MLK

Mr. Wachtel, Dr. King's legal counsel, provides an update on pending matters regarding the American Foundation of Non-Violence.

Letter from Herbert Jones to MLK

Mr. Jones informs Dr. King of a grassroots civil rights organization (STOP) that seeks to implement a "stay at home" protest nationwide. Mr. Jones seeks Dr. King's assistance to make that happen.

Letter from Herman E. Talmadge to MLK

Senator Herman E. Talmadge expresses his views on the poll tax with reference to the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Letter from Hersel Lillard to MLK

Lillard writes to Dr. King from the United States Public Health Service Hospital in Lexington Kentucky in hopes that Dr. King will help him because he feels the Court was prejudice against him. He hopes to prevent his injustice from happening to others in his situation. He also mentions two other men, Mulloy and Pratt, about to stand trial and in need of assistance.

Letter from High School Student Elizabeth L. Andrews to MLK

Elizabeth Andrews, a sophomore at North Hills High School, requests Dr. King's autograph for her class letter writing project.

Letter from Ira Edmond Gillet to MLK

Mr. Gillet, a member of the Fellowship of Reconciliation and former missionary in South Africa, sends Dr. King his thoughts on a recent petition circulated by the American Committee on Africa. He explains that the actions called for in the petition would "do more harm than good." Gillet encloses a copy of the petition, highlighted with his own comments, which implores President Kennedy to impose sanctions on South Africa.

Letter from Irene Zimmerman to MLK

Miss Zimmerman expresses disapproval in Dr. King's support of Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from James Dombrowski to Mrs. King

In this letter, James Dombrowski of the Southern Conference Educational Fund requests financial contributions from Mrs. Coretta S. King for a proposed publication to be entitled "The Color Line in Voting." The initial prototype publication would include the stories of Gus Courts and George W. Lee, who were assassinated, after refusing to remove their names from a voter registration list in Humphreys County, Mississippi.

Letter from James Lynwood Walker to MLK

James Lynwood Walker writes Dr. King about Muhammed Ali's refusal to join the army.

Letter from Jean Ward Wolff to MLK

Jean Ward Wolff expresses her concern about Dr. King turning his back on truth and justice in the form of supporting Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter From Jimmy Williams to MLK

Jimmy Williams, a U.S. Air Force officer, writes Dr. King requesting assistance in protesting his unjust termination from Officers Training School.

Letter from Joan Sinkler to MLK

Joan Sinkler writes Dr. King expressing that she is disappointed with him for not mentioning "the racist and colonialist character" of the Vietnam War. Sinkler asserts that the US did not go to war to protect Hungary, Cuba or Tibet.

Letter from John A. McDermott to MLK

Mr. McDermott, Executive Director of the Catholic Interracial Council, asks Dr. King to wire a message of greeting to be used at the upcoming John F. Kennedy Award dinner. McDermott informs Dr. King that Monsignor Daniel M. Cantwell, a founder of the Catholic Interracial Council, will be the honoree. Monsignor Cantwell he is leaving to accept an appointment to the position of Archbishop.

Letter from John Coventry Smith to MLK

John Coventry Smith, a member of the United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A., invites Dr. King to Brazil to speak at the Campinas Presbyterian Theological Seminary during his tenure in the South American country. Mr. Smith asserts that Dr. King's appearance is of importance to the young potential leaders of Brazil. Dr. King will further enlighten the Protestants in Brazil of the Christian faith to the racial issues in the United States.

Letter from John E. Farrow to MLK

John Farrow writes Dr. King to suggest he tread softly as he continues the fight for social justice. Farrow states that whites will fight back with brute force against desegregation and civil rights for all. Farrow urges Dr. King to offer knowledge but not seek to antagonize whites during the March on Washington and his future efforts for the civil rights movement.

Letter from John Lewis to MLK Regarding the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party

In this letter, John Lewis encourages Dr. King to start a letter writing campaign to prevent the illegal election of Representatives from Mississippi. Lewis offers Dr. King assistance from the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

Letter from John Shirley to MLK

John Shirley, of the Oxford University Cherwell Newspaper, poses a list of questions to Dr. King concerning Civil Rights, the Vietnam War, and the emergence of Black Power groups. Shirley assures the Reverend of his gratitude for any feedback he may provide, and informs him of the circulation of the literature at being well over 10,000 within the University.

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