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Racism

Associated Archive Content : 421 results

Letter from L. Alexander Harper and Charles E. Cobb to Edith M. Lerrigo

Edith Lerrigo writes with concern regarding the support of the "Crisis and Commitment" call by several civil rights leaders. Lerrigo endorses Dr. King's decision to refuse his signatory on the document supporting the call, stating that this act "should have been sufficient to give pause to groups like the YWCA before jumping on the moderate bandwagon."

Letter from L. K. Jackson to MLK

Rev. Jackson updates Dr. King on his recent activities, how hard he has been fighting for equality for all Americans, and regrets to inform him that he is ill.

Letter from Lottie Thomas to MLK

Lottie Thomas, a Negro businesswoman from Alaska, requests Dr. King's help with her business. Mrs. Thomas informs Dr. King of the unjust treatment she has endured in Alaska and of her current financial tribulations.

Letter from Margaret Long to MLK

Margaret Long asks Dr. King to reconsider his plans for the demonstration in Washington, D.C. She expresses that though she understands why Dr. King advocates for demonstrations, she does not believe it will be advantageous.

Letter from Mark Raphael to MLK

Mark Raphael, the President of the All-Square Student Congress Speaker's Bureau at New York University, invites Dr. King to talk about his priorities in America and plans for Washington.

Letter from Maurice Dawkins to MLK

Maurice Dawkins, Assistant Director for Civil Rights of the Office of Economic Opportunity, invites Dr. King to attend a meeting aimed at funding summer projects for riot-prone cities. Mr. Dawkins has already encouraged President Johnson to help fund $75 million for summer programs.

Letter from Miss Susan Frehse to MLK

Miss Frehse expresses her feelings about Dr. King's book, "Stride Toward Freedom,"and how it was hard to convince her classmates of the degree to which the white people in Alabama went to rob Negroes of their rights. She also asks Dr. King to send any available information that will help her classmates understand the reality of racism in the South.

Letter from MLK

Dr. King thanks the supporters of the "Martin Luther King Fund" for their integral role in the effort to end poverty and discrimination.

Letter from MLK to Adolph Held

Dr. King writes Adolph Held, President of the Jewish Labor Committee, in response to his inquiry regarding SCLC's position on anti-semitism. Dr. King clarifies a number of distortions produced by the media, and presents the facts of the Chicago Conference of New Politics event throughout the letter.

Letter from MLK to Al Capp

Dr. King writes Al Capp, formally known as the Cartoonist Alfred Gerald Caplin, acknowledging his previous correspondence. King asserts that his organization deplores violence regardless of race and hopes that Caplin's "current hostility will be overcome, and that he will exercise a deep concern for the welfare of all people of this country."

Letter from MLK to Bernard Goldstein

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Bernard Goldstein for her contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains the importance of her contribution and how it helps in their fight for equality.

Letter from MLK to Canon H. W. Montefiore

Dr. King informs Canon H. W. Montefiore of his inability to accept the "gracious" invitation to speak at the University Church in England. Dr. King's commitment to the racial injustices in the United States and new book makes it impossible for him to travel to Cambridge.

Letter from MLK to Charles H. Dorr

Dr. King writes Charles Dorr acknowledging his support of the young African American men who are boycotting the Olympic games. King states, "the country must concern itself with the plight of all Negroes and not just the privileged few."

Letter from MLK to Charles Sanders

Dr. King discusses with Charles Sanders the possibility of an SCLC fundraiser in Paris, France. He asks Mr. Sanders to convene a meeting of potential donors to raise money for SCLC's operational fund.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Eisendrath

In this letter, Dr. King writes to Dr. Eisendrath to clarify SCLC's view on anti-Semitism. Dr. King explains that neither he nor his organization support any resolution calling for black separatism or the condemnation of Israel. He identifies oil as the primary issue in the region and maintains the only way to relieve the tensions between the Middle East and the United States is through peaceful solutions.

Letter from MLK to Dr. James C. Gray

Dr. King thanks Dr. James Gray for his generous contribution to the SCLC and states, "Without your dollars for freedom, the Conference would be unable to work effectively."

Letter from MLK to Former Supporters

Dr. King addresses former supporters concerning his controversial stance on Vietnam. He examines the country's colonial history and struggle for independence as contributing factors to America's current military presence in Vietnam. The civil rights leader defends his commitment to nonviolence as an "exceptional moral responsibility" that must transcend international borders.

Letter from MLK to J. E. L. Graham

Dr. King informs Mr. Graham that he is unable to accept an invitation to speak in Ontario extended by the Hamilton Branch of the United Nations. He further explains that this decision is necessary in order to spend more time resolving racial injustice issues in our country.

Letter from MLK to James L. Hicklin

Dr. King expresses gratitude for being considered for a position on the National Board of Governors for the Freedom For All Foundation, but he declines due to commitments to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and other pastoral duties.

Letter from MLK to James Marley

Dr. King thanks James Marley for his contribution to the SCLC and gives a brief summary of how the funds benefit the Negro communities.

Letter from MLK to L. LeVard Colbert

Dr. King thanks L. LeVard Colbert for his contribution to SCLC. Dr. King states that his donation will be utilized to assist with voter registration and ending segregation in the South.

Letter from MLK to Laura Graves

Dr. King thanks Laura Graves for her recent letter which presented suggestions and advice regarding the prejudice in the American community. King states, "with persons of good will increasingly speaking on behalf of racial injustice, the day will arrive more quickly."

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Stoug

Dr. King writes Mrs. Stoug thanking her for sending a copy of the play, "Listen America." He also offers advice on how to market her play and expresses his appreciation for her support for the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from MLK to Naomi Thomas

Dr. King explains to Naomi Thomas his reasons for supporting athletes who plan to boycott the Olympics.

Letter from MLK to Nathaniel Barber

Dr. King thanks Nathaniel Barber for his contribution to the SCLC and gives a brief overview of the work done by the organization.

Letter from MLK to President Johnson on Greenville Air Base

Dr. King writes to President Johnson proposing the conversion of the Greenville Air Base to a center for training and housing for poverty-stricken Negro citizens of the Mississippi Delta. He urges that the program be coordinated by federal officials and representatives, that action be taken to provide decent housing and nondiscriminatory training programs, and that clear-cut procedures for evaluation be established.

Letter from MLK to Rabbi S. Burr Yampol

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Rabbi Yampol, Chairman of the National Committee to Combat Nazism, for sending a copy of his organization's resolution.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Barnard Holliday

Dr. King writes Reverend Holliday, Pastor at Pond Street Baptist Church, thanking him for his contribution and words of encouragement. Dr. King also encloses a receipt for his donation.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Harold E. Carlson

Dr. King writes Reverend Carlson to thank him for his recent telegram of encouragement and support. Dr. King states, "You may be confident that such reassurance provides us with an additional source of strength." Dr. King also discusses the philosophy of the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Casper I. Glenn

Dr. King writes to Rev. Glenn, President of the NAACP chapter in Tucson, Arizona, regarding Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech. Dr. King informs him that the Motown Record Corporation has been granted rights of this speech.

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