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Racism

Associated Archive Content : 421 results

Letter from MLK to Robert Epstein

Dr. King responds to a letter from Robert Epstein regarding the objective of SCLC. King states, "No man can comment adequately on his own motives... I would hope agape is the driving force in our movement." Dr. King encloses a pamphlet entitled "This is SCLC."

Letter from MLK to Robert H. Gates

Dr. King thanks Robert Gates for his contribution to the SCLC. King encloses an official receipt and expresses that his contribution will assist in their work in Birmingham and throughout the South.

Letter from MLK to Robert Lewis Jr.

Dr. King expounds on Mr. Lewis' experiences and how they directly correlate with the effects of the racial divide. Dr. King further explicates the emotional stress that one faces as a child of both Africa and America.

Letter from MLK to T. C. Johnson

Dr. King thanks Mrs. T. C. Johnson for her contribution to the SCLC and encloses an official receipt for her gift. King states, "Without your moral support we would be caught in a dungeon of despair."

Letter from MLK to the Lamar W. Sessoms Family

Dr. King replies to the Sessoms' previous letter that requested assistance in alleviating racial inequality in Mississippi. King informs them that the first step is to "urge the struggle in our own community," and the second step is for everyone to "join together across the nation with people of good will and combat the evils of racism and injustice."

Letter from MLK to Willard T. Carter

Dr. King thanks Mr. and Mrs. Willard Carter for their monetary contribution to the SCLC. King states that because of friends like them he can help end racial discrimination and segregation in the South.

Letter from MLK to William A. Bennett Jr.

Dr. King responds to a letter from William Bennett in which Bennett suggested the phrase "dark skinned American" be used to describe African Americans. Dr. King discusses the connotations of the hateful words "deeply rooted in the debilitating racist caste ordering of our society's slavery epoch and segregation era."

Letter from Mr. Levison Regarding U.S. Congressman Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.

Mr. Levison expresses his support for Representative Powell during the controversial House of Representatives committee chairmanship and ethical dilemma. Levison goes on to defend the suggestion of race being the determining factor of his criticism by volunteering his support of any review of congressional systems.

Letter from Mrs. Frances Pauley to Albany Residents

Mrs. Pauley provides a call to action amidst the troubles in Georgia so that everyone can participate to resolve the troubles.

Letter from Mrs. Julia D. Fields to MLK

Julia Fields is the only Negro stockbroker in Florida and discusses the adversities she has experienced with Dr. King. Mrs. Fields describes this time period as the "worst year of her life" because the whites resent any Negro attempting to move in their neighborhood. Dr. King is addressed to possibly give advice to better her situation and uplift her "let down" spirit.

Letter from Mrs. R. K. Matthews to Mrs. King

This letter is from a middle class housewife who expressed her despair and frustration to Mrs. King in learning of Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Mrs. Stitzinger to Martin Luther King Sr.

Mrs. Stitzinger asserts that the African American community is entitled to their rights but that it doesn't mean that white people have to acknowledge or accept them. She suggests that they create black owned restaurants, hotels, etc. solely so black people will not have to interact directly with the white race.

Letter from P. Edward Haley to MLK

P. Haley writes to express appreciation for Dr. King's works. Haley encloses copy of letter he and his wife sent to their Congressmen commending Dr. King's ideas concerning Vietnam and the riots. The Haleys are making an effort to start a nationwide campaign by encouraging their friends to write their congressman as well.

Letter from Pastor William A. Lawson to MLK

Pastor Bill Lawson writes Dr. King seeking his help with spreading the Civil Rights Movement in Houston. He asks King to establish a permanent SCLC office in Houston and engage in nonviolent demonstrations.

Letter from Paul Eshelman to MLK

Mr. Eshelman writes to Dr. King in support of his efforts toward helping African Americans become "first class citizens."

Letter from Polly M. Williams to Whom it May Concern

Polly Williams, a former counselor of the Neighborhood Youth Corps, requests a full investigation of its director, Mr. Pace. Mrs. Williams requested a sick leave while undergoing surgery, yet later discovered that her request had counted as vacation time. She discusses numerous orders she received from Mr. Pace that negatively impacted her health and her recovery from surgery. She believes that she is a victim of racial discrimination in the workplace.

Letter from Reverend William D.F. Morris to MLK

Rev. William D. F. Morris, of Centennial United Church in Toronto, invites Dr. King to visit his church during Lent.

Letter from Robert Birley to MLK

Robert Birley invites Dr. King to give an address at a program in London. Mr. Birley informs Dr. King of the four topics that will be discussed and requests that Dr. King address the topic of racial discrimination.

Letter from Rosamond Reynolds to MLK

Rosamond C. Reynolds informs Dr. King that the Fifth General Assembly of the Unitarian Universalist Association adopted a comprehensive Statement of Consensus on Racial Justice. The statement reflects "the preponderance of opinion of the denomination, its members, and its churches, on the problems of segregation, discrimination, racial violence, education, housing..."

Letter from Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration to Henry Brownell

The Southern Negro Leaders Conference on Transportation and Nonviolent Integration request a conference with U.S. Attorney General Brownell to discuss the federal government's plans.

Letter from Stephen Harris to MLK

Numerous riots have occurred at Marble Mountain Air Base in Vietnam due to mounting racial tensions. Stephen Harris, of the United States Marine Corps, writes to Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael addressing his frustration and the concerns of many Negro servicemen stationed there.

Letter from student Sue Moranian to MLK

Sue Moranian, a fourteen year old white girl, writes Dr. King and encloses a $2.00 contribution to assist in endeavors to help blacks reach racial equality.

Letter from Ted Bleecker to MLK

Ted Bleecker, Director of Publications for the United Federation of Teachers, extends gratitude to Dr. King for his statement in the Federation's 50th anniversary issue. Enclosed is a copy of the issue in which Dr. King congratulates the Federation, draws comparisons between the attitudes of the Federation and the Civil Rights Movement, and thanks them for receipt of the John Dewey Award.

Letter from the Associated Negro Press to MLK

Donald Kittell, an administrative assistant for the Associated Negro Press, writes to Dr. King regarding his four "My Dream" columns. Enclosed in the letter is a copy of each column. Dr. King writes on a variety of topics such as social justice, equality, nonviolence and the progress of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from the KKK Kids to MLK

An anonymous member of The K.K.K. Kids writes Dr. King expressing that he or she believes Dr. King to be "a very ignorant person."

Letter from Tom Offenburger to MLK

In a letter from Tom Offenburger to Dr. King, a response to a newspaper article written by Bruce Galphin is attached. The article refers to the Civil Rights Movement as a rather violent campaign, due to the harm done to the "good order of society." The response argues on the side of the Civil Rights Movement, and further proves that it is indeed a nonviolent campaign.

Letter from Troy J. Horton to MLK

Troy J. Horton, a teacher at Wilson High School, inquires if Dr. King is interested in speaking to the student body of the school on topics such as racism, prejudice and segregation.

Letter from V. K. Krishna Menon to MLK

V. K. Krishna Menon informs Dr. King of the upcoming International Conference Against War Danger, which has the support of more than 70 countries. He requests that Dr. King contribute a paper about racism to the conference, and he also invites Dr. King to attend the event.

Letter from Virginia Madden to Mrs. King

Virginia Madden, a 91-year-old white woman from Philadelphia, writes to congratulate Mrs. King on Dr. King's winning the Nobel Peace Prize. She says she has deplored racism and welcomes the new Civil Rights Law.

Letter from Wendell K. Jones to MLK and Leon M. Sullivan

This is a letter of support to Dr. King from Wendell K. Jones for his tireless work on behalf of African Americans. Mr. Jones also recognizes Rev. Leon M. Sullivan for helping African Americans in Massachusetts.

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